Lesson

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.

Washington's experience in deploying five Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS) projects and developing a standardized approach for evaluating ATIS projects.


5/1/2005
Washington,United States


Background (Show)

Lesson Learned

While the traveling public is often thought of as the primary consumer of the information collected and disseminated by advanced traveler information systems, ATIS information is also valuable to DOT maintenance operations and crews. In that sense, maintenance organizations are not only project clients but also recipients of the project benefits. Maintenance crew benefits ultimately manifest themselves in better road services for the public, such as more timely and effective roadway maintenance and traveler information.
  • Encourage maintenance organizations to use ATIS information to perform their tasks more efficiently and effectively. Advanced traveler information offers a potentially significant in-house maintenance benefit to transportation and other agencies. This is especially the case where information sources are limited and road conditions are critical to safety, such as with rural applications. Example of benefits to maintenance staff include the following:
      Remote access to variable message signs: Replacement of manually updated message signs with signs that can be remotely updated enables maintenance crews to spend more of their time monitoring and improving road conditions, and less time traveling to signs and manually changing them.

      Improved communications: Improved networks and supporting infrastructure put in place to support communications to ATIS devices can sometimes be used to facilitate improved crew communications as well.

      Improved forecasting and prioritizing: Remote access to road condition data (e.g., RWIS sensors) enables crews to more efficiently forecast future weather and road conditions, make snowplowing decisions, and prioritize maintenance tasks and routes.

      Remote verification: Camera views enable personnel to remotely verify road and weather information, as well as to confirm that message transmissions to VMS were successfully received.

      Faster response: Information from ATIS devices allows crews to respond more quickly to changing road conditions, thereby reducing the impact of backups and other inconveniences for travelers.

This lesson points out that ATIS technology is not only beneficial to the traveling public, but is also valuable to the operations and maintenance crews that work with the ATIS systems. With advanced ATIS systems providing more accurate and remote information, operations and maintenance staff can be more efficient and effective with their time and thus be more economical; more accurate information also translates to improved traveler mobility and safety. This lesson also identifies the fact that some of these above-described benefits are not realized at the onset of ATIS deployment, but are learned gradually.


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Source

ATIS Evaluation Framework

Author: Jaime M. Kopf, et al

Published By: Washington State Department of Transportation, sponsoring agency Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC), University of Washington, performing organization

Source Date: 5/1/2005

EDL Number: 14313

Other Reference Number: Report No. WA-RD 606.1; Agreement T1803, Task 27

URL: http://depts.washington.edu/trac/bulkdisk/pdf/606.1.pdf

Other Lessons From this Source

Lesson Contacts

Lesson Contact(s):

Jaime Kopf
Washington State Transportation Center
(206) 616-8265
jmkopf@u.washington.edu


Agency Contact(s):

Eldon Jacobson
Washington State Department of Transportation
(206) 685-3187
eldon@u.washington.edu

Lesson Analyst:

Jane Lappin
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
617-494-3692
jane.lappin@volpe.dot.gov


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Application Areas

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Freeway Management > Information Dissemination > Dynamic Message Signs

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Freeway Management > Information Dissemination > Highway Advisory Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Traffic Incident Management > Information Dissemination > Dynamic Message Signs

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Traffic Incident Management > Information Dissemination > Highway Advisory Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Traveler Information > Pre-Trip Information > TV/Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Roadway Operations & Maintenance > Information Dissemination > Dynamic Message Signs

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Traveler Information > En Route Information > Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Roadway Operations & Maintenance > Information Dissemination > Highway Advisory Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Road Weather Management > Information Dissemination > Dynamic Message Signs

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Road Weather Management > Information Dissemination > Highway Advisory Radio

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Transportation Management Centers > Permanent TMCs > Transit

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Transportation Management Centers > Permanent TMCs > Rural

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Transportation Management Centers > Permanent TMCs > Freeway

Intelligent Transportation Systems > Transportation Management Centers > Permanent TMCs > Arterial

States

Washington

Countries

United States

Systems Engineering

Show the V

None defined

Keywords

DMS, CMS, VMS, Changeable Message Signs, Variable Message Signs, HAR

Lesson ID: 2006-00246