Lesson

Use an appropriate procurement mechanism to support the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Institutional lessons from a partnership to implement emerging ITS technologies in the Seattle metropolitan area.


30 May 2000
Seattle,Washington,United States


Background (Show)

Lesson Learned

SmartTrek was a partnership of twenty public and private organizations that implemented emerging technologies to help improve the performance of the Seattle region’s existing transportation system. This project involved the application of a diverse range of traveler information technologies. The project’s evaluation team determined that the success of the project was due, in part, to the flexibility offered by use of different procurement mechanisms as appropriate to the multiple public and private organizations involved in the project. The lesson learned was as follows:
  • Use innovative procurement mechanisms to engage private sector parties. This can streamline the procurement process, which allows valuable time to be saved in the deployment life cycle.

In Smart Trek, the use of the federal procurement process as the competitive process for obtaining the help of private sector parties under sole-source contracts was a good example of applying flexible procurement methods. This tactic enabled WSDOT staff to quickly procure services from private sector participants once the project’s funding was granted.

Effective use of the procurement process requires choosing an appropriate lead agency with a flexible contracting mechanism. Also important is use of the right procurement instruments. Because time was an important factor in SmartTrek, the most desirable contracts were either ones that were already in place or that were the quickest to initiate. The need to achieve project goals in a timely manner led participants to use a variety of contracting mechanisms, including the federal competitive process, multi-party agreements, competitive contracts, sole-source contracts, and phased contracts.

Although the diverse participants in SmartTrek faced several obstacles, none of them proved to be insurmountable or drastically affected the ITS deployments. This was in part because the project team demonstrated flexibility and streamlined the procurement process.


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Source

Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Evaluation Report

Author: Jensen, M., et al. (SAIC, Battelle, Mitretek, and Volpe)

Published By: Federal Highway Administration, U.S. DOT

Prepared by SAIC for the U.S. DOT

Source Date: 30 May 2000

EDL Number: 13071

Other Reference Number: Report No. FHWA-OP-00-019

URL: http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/jpodocs/repts_te/13071.pdf

Other Lessons From this Source

Lesson Contacts

Lesson Contact(s):

Edward McCormack
Washington State Transportation Center
206-543-3348
edm@u.washington.edu


Agency Contact(s):

Peter Briglia
Washington State Department of Transportation
206-543-3331
Briglia@u.washington.edu

Lesson Analyst:

Firoz Kabir
Noblis
202-863-2987
firoz.kabir@noblis.org


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Benefits From This Source

A model determined that incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington could decrease the number of stops by 5.6 percent.

A model found that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington would help reduce the number of expected crashes by 2.5 percent and the frequency of fatal crashes by 1.1 percent.

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.

Simulation results indicated that vehicle emissions could be reduced by two percent if arterial traffic flow data were included in the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington.

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.

Costs From This Source

An advanced parking information system was deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative for $925,000; maintenance costs of the system hardware were estimated at 7% of the hardware capital costs.

Bus tracking capability was added to the Metro Online Web site as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative at a cost of $333,000.

Nineteen metropolitan North Seattle, Washington city signal systems were integrated at a cost of $1,755,000.

Software development was the key cost driver for the bus arrival and departure information system deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.

The total capital cost of the Seattle MMDI emergency operations centers project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700; O&M costs were approximately 5% of the equipment costs.

Lessons From This Source

Develop long-range plans to ensure the success and continuity of advanced traveler information systems.

Involve the private sector in the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Use an appropriate procurement mechanism to support the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Application Areas

None defined

States

Washington

Countries

United States

Focus Areas

None defined

Goal Areas

Efficiency

Keywords

None defined

Lesson ID: 2005-00119