Integration Link (19 unique benefit summaries found)

Link 1: Arterial Management to Traveler Information


In St. Louis County, Missouri, full closure of portions of I-64 for two years allowed for an accelerated construction schedule, saving taxpayers between $93 million and $187 million.(November 2011)

Simulation models show that real-time on-board driver assistance systems that recommend proper following distances can improve fuel economy by approximately 10 percent.(21-25 September 2009)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

In St. Paul, Minnesota, an advanced parking management system reduced travel times by nine percent.(January 2007)

At the Baltimore/Washington International (BWI) airport, 81 percent of surveyed travelers agreed that the advanced parking management system made parking easier compared to other airports.(January 2007)

Initial research suggests that most drivers will respond to intersection collision warning systems and slow or stop appropriately.(22-26 January 2006)

Adaptive signal control systems deployed in five metropolitan areas have reduced delay 19 to 44 percent.(December 2000)

Adaptive signal control systems reduced vehicle stops by 28 to 41 percent; improve safety.(December 2000)

Adaptive signal control can lower operations and maintenance costs.(December 2000)

Arterial information allows travelers to make more informed decisions.(December 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study in Seattle found that if 6 to 10 percent of travelers started using pre-trip traveler information during severe weather conditions, there would be a small positive impact on roadway system efficiency and mobility .(October 2000)

Based on the survey results only 9 percent of households were aware of TravInfo, and less than 1 percent of the Bay area commuters who used traveler information used TravInfo.(25 April 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)