Integration Link (49 unique benefit summaries found)

Link 6: Incident Management to Traveler Information


Transit operations decision support systems (TODSS) reduce false and low priority incident reports sent to dispatchers by 60 percent, allowing dispatchers to focus on higher priority incidents.(February 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 corridor in Dallas, Texas produced an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 20.4:1.(September 2010)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

In Georgia, the Navigator incident management program reduced secondary crashes from an expected 676 to 210 in the twelve months ending April 2004.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced the average incident duration from 67 minutes to 21 minutes, saving 7.25 million vehicle-hours of delay over one year. (August 2006)

In Georgia, the HERO motorist assistance patrol program and NaviGAtor incident management activities saved more than 187 million dollars yielding a benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.4:1.(August 2006)

In Atlanta, satisfaction with motorist assistance patrols ranged from 93 to greater than 95 percent in two separate surveys of drivers who were already aware of the service.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced annual fuel consumption by 6.83 million gallons, and contributed to decreased emissions: 2,457 tons less Carbon monoxide, 186 tons less hydrocarbons, and 262 tons less Nitrous oxides.(August 2006)

At the Breezewood Interchange on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, installation of a truck rollover warning system immediately reduced the occurrence of truck rollover crashes.(April 2006)

In rural areas, communication networks that provide immediate access to remote data controls on field data can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations and maintenance activities.(5/1/2005)

In North Carolina, a wet pavement detection system on I-85 yielded a 39 percent reduction in the annual crash rate under wet conditions.(August 2004)

Simulations indicated that using a decision support tool to select alternative traffic control plans during non-recurring congestion in the Disney Land area of Anaheim, California could reduce travel time by 2 to 29 percent and decrease stop time by 15 to 56 percent. (December 2001)

Modeling indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced delay by 0.2 minutes per trip during AM peak periods and by 0.6 minutes during PM peak periods. (4-7 June 2001)

A model indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced crash fatalities by 3.2 percent during peak periods.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling found emissions reductions of 3.7 to 4.6 percent due to an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.(30 May 2000)

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.(30 May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that users of an improved traveler information web site would receive annual benefits of a 5.4 percent reduction in delay.(May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that drivers of vehicles with in-vehicle navigation devices could experience an 8.1 percent reduction in delay.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, 60 percent of drivers of transit vehicles equipped with in-vehicle navigation devices reported that they saved time and felt safer.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, usage of a traveler information Web site increased at a rate of 19 percent per year and spiked during severe weather events.(May 2000)

Based on the survey results only 9 percent of households were aware of TravInfo, and less than 1 percent of the Bay area commuters who used traveler information used TravInfo.(25 April 2000)

In Phoenix, Arizona, an evaluation of traveler information provided on cable television found that 29 percent of surveyed respondents thought the traffic channel was useful.(April 2000)

In Phoenix, Arizona, an evaluation of website traveler information found that 16 percent of surveyed respondents thought the web site information was useful.(April 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

In European cities, advanced parking information systems have reduced traffic volumes related to parking space searches up to 25 percent.(August 1999)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

In Sweden, test drivers of a prototype system indicated that the intelligent speed adaptation feature was well received.(August 1999)

Automated speed enforcement in England has increased capacity by 5 to 10 percent. (August 1999)

In 1999, a study in Seattle, Washington indicated that participants who used traveler information devices including wrist watches, in-vehicle components, and portable computers found the information was useful for making travel decisions.(5 January 1999)

In Japan, a field test found that conventional toll collection takes an average of 14 seconds per car, while electronic toll collection takes only 3 seconds per car.(October 1997)

In Japan, a real-time incident detection and warning system installed on a dangerous curve on the Hanshin Expressway decreased the rate of secondary crashes by 50 percent.(October 1997)

In Minneapolis, a traffic incident information pager service was used daily by 65 percent of participants, and at least once-per-week by 88 percent of participants; users decided to changed travel routes in 42 percent of the situations.(10 June 1997)

In Brooklyn, an incident management system on the Gowanus and Prospect Expressways used CCTV, highway advisory radio, dynamic message signs, and a construction information hotline to improve average incident clearance time by about one hour, a 66 percent improvement.(May 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

Evaluations of the QUARTET PLUS and TABASCO Projects in Europe found that transit signal priority reduced travel time for transit vehicles by 5 to 15 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS evaluation reports show that electronic toll collection can decrease traffic volumes by up to 17 percent.(1994-1998)

In Glasglow, Scotland, ITS evaluation reports show that ramp metering can improve freeway capacity by 5 to 13 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, a centralized and coordinated paratransit system resulted in a 2 to 3 percent annual decrease in the cost to provide paratransit services.(1994-1998)

In Paris, France, incident management resulted in a nine-minute reduction in response time(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS studies found customer satisfaction with traveler information delivered via portable electronic devices, public access terminals, Internet web sites, and in-vehicle navigation devices ranged from 50 to 95 percent. (1994-1998)