Electronic Payment & Pricing (102 unique benefit summaries found)

Gross toll revenue of the I-10 ExpressLanes was $8,918,985 and I-110 ExpressLanes was $18,704,961 in the first 16 months of HOT lane operation.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of variable rate, all-electronic, open road tolling on SR-520 Bridge near Seattle yielded $55 million of revenue in 2012.(12/02/2014)

After deployment of pricing and electronic tolling on SR 520, travel-time reliability improved by 6 to 13 minutes during peak periods on that route.(12/02/2014)

After tolling the SR 520 Bridge, mean travel speeds increased by over 10 mi/h in both directions during both peak periods.(12/02/2014)

HOT lane conversion improved travel times during peak periods and influenced 49 percent of new I-85 Xpress bus riders to start using transit.(03/21/2014)

During the planned expansion of the I-15 HOT lanes in San Diego a survey of facility users found that 71 percent considered the extension fair with few differences based on ethnicity or income.(February 2011)

Variable Pricing Systems worldwide indicate an increase in transit use and improved travel times and speeds system wide (priced lanes and general purpose lanes).(February 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

In Germany, vehicle-miles traveled using cleaner trucks (Euro 4 and 5) rose 60 percent from 2 percent in 2005 to over 62 percent in 2009 because of the nationwide heavy-goods-vehicle tolling program.(12/01/2010)

In Puget Sound, variable tolling on SR-167 made more efficient use of carpool lanes without delaying buses; average speeds in general purpose lanes increased by 21 percent while average speeds in HOT lanes increased by 6 percent.(Winter 2009/2010)

Early HOV to HOT conversion projects implemented in San Diego saved I-15 FasTrak users up to 20 minutes compared to main line travelers.(August 2008)

In Puget Sound, planners estimated that the conversion of HOV to HOT on a nine mile section of SR-167 would allow 13 percent more vehicles to travel the SR-167 corridor daily, and increase use of HOV/HOT lanes by 38 percent.(August 2008)

In Denver, soon after the conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-25/US-36, 10 to 15 percent of all daily person trips occurred in the HOT lanes, at full highway speeds, while those in the general-purpose lanes experienced stop-and-go congestion.(August 2008)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

In Florida, the addition of Open Road Tolling (ORT) to an existing Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) mainline toll plaza decreased delay by 50 percent for manual cash customers and by 55 percent for automatic coin machine customers, and increased speed by 57 percent in the express lanes.(21-25 January 2007)

In Florida, the addition of Open Road Tolling (ORT) to an existing Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) mainline toll plaza decreased crashes by an estimated 22 to 26 percent.(21-25 January 2007)

Violations fell from 20 percent to 9 percent with implementation of transponder-based electronic tolling(November 2006)

Pre-clearance systems that use interagency coordination to deploy interoperable electronic toll collection (ETC) and electronic screening (E-screening) systems improve the efficiency of motor carrier operations by saving time and money. Interoperable applications incorporated into a single transponder can save carriers between $0.63 to $2.15 per event at weigh stations. (12/2/2005)

Value pricing has been shown to increase revenue, reduce congestion by maximizing lane capacity and reduce travel time of highway transportation.(27 February 2003)

An evaluation of electronic toll collection systems at three major toll plazas outside Baltimore, Maryland indicated these systems reduced environmentally harmful emissions by 16 to 63 percent. (January 2002)

The E-ZPass electronic toll collection system on the New Jersey Turnpike reduced delay for all vehicles by 85 percent saving an estimated 1.2 million gallons of fuel each year and eliminating approximately 0.35 tons of VOC and 0.056 tons NOx per weekday.(August 2001)

Implementation of the E-ZPass electronic toll collection system on the New Jersey Turnpike reduced delay for all vehicles by 85 percent saving approximately 2.1 million hours per year.(August 2001)

In Florida, the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority found that driver uncertainty about congestion at E-PASS toll stations contributed to a 48 percent increase in crashes.(March 2001)

A survey of travelers indicated that 20 percent of motorists traveling on two bridges in Lee County, Florida adjusted their departure times in response to an electronic payment value pricing program that gave motorists a 50 percent discount on bridge tolls during off peak periods.(1-4 May 2000)

During the initial deployment of electronic toll collection on the Carquinez Bridge (1996-1997) there was an increased number of crashes and personal injuries.(March 1999)

In California, electronic toll collection on the Carquinez Bridge decreased annual emissions of Carbon monoxide, Nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons.(March 1999)

In California, the time saving benefits of electronic toll collection on the Carquinez Bridge saved travelers more than a million dollars per year.(March 1999)

In California, electronic toll collection on the Carquinez Bridge saved 25,193 hours per year by improving traffic movement through the toll facility and reducing the time required to process transactions.(March 1999)

Impacts of Electronic Toll Collection on Vehicle Emissions(11-15 January 1998)

In Japan, a field test found that conventional toll collection takes an average of 14 seconds per car, while electronic toll collection takes only 3 seconds per car.(October 1997)

On the Tappan Zee Bridge toll plaza, a manual toll lane can accommodate 400 to 450 vehicles per hour while an electronic lane peaks at 1000 vehicles per hour.(5-8 August 1995)

In Europe, ITS evaluation reports show that electronic toll collection can decrease traffic volumes by up to 17 percent.(1994-1998)

A feasibility study for electronic toll collection on the Florida Turnpike indicated that a 10 to 30 percent participation rate would yield benefit-to-cost ratios of 2:1 to 3:1, respectively.(1990)

Transit Smart Card fare payment has ability to significantly reduce time buses spend waiting at bus stops for passengers to board.(08/01/2015)

Bus speeds increase by 29 mph after High Occupancy Toll conversion and opening of Priced Dynamic Shoulder Lanes. (January 4, 2013)

Joint deployment of scheduling software and Automatic Vehicle Location/Mobile Data Terminals (AVL/MDT) increased ridership and quality of service for two rural transit providers.(December 2010)

Smart card technology reduces fare collection transaction time by more than 30 percent.(March 2010)

Data archive warehousing pays for itself in less than 1.4 years and scheduling software saves almost four weeks per year for operations planners.(December 2009)

Implementation of ITS with AVL, real-time passenger information, and electronic fare media in a mid-sized transit system resulted in a minimum 3.9:1 benefit/cost ratio.(July 2009)

Fare collection systems that use electronic tickets or passes can reduce passenger boarding times by 13 percent compared to driver operated systems that require exact change.(February 2009)

Transit users and individual operators enjoy most of the benefits of smart cards, while individual transit operators and multiple agencies bear the majority of the deployment costs.(August, 2008)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects personal travel time reductions of 3.7 percent for drivers and 24 percent for transit users.(May 2005)

In the Puget Sound region of Washington State, a fare payment integration system that used joint passes to allow base fares to be transferred between agencies increased the percentage of riders that made transfers.(25 March 2005)

Proof-of-payment systems that use ticket vending/validating machines can reduce boarding times by up to 38 percent.(August 2004)

In Chicago, A CTA survey of smartcard users found that features related to convenience, rail use, and speed were most liked by program participants; 21 percent rated convenience over the magnetic stripe card as their single favorite feature of the system. The most desired features were the multi-use functions and ability to recharge the smartcard via the Internet and credit card.(13-17 January 2002.)

Impacts of Transit Fare Policy Initiatives Under an Automated Fare System(Summer 2000)

In 1996, the project benefits of existing and planned deployments of transit ITS technologies were estimated to yield between $3.8 billion and $7.4 billion (discounted dollars for 1996) within several years.(July 1996)

Based on a travel reduction ordinance requiring Phoenix employers with over 100 employees to reduce single-occupancy commuting trips by 5 percent, the City Public Transport Agency led the development of a Bus Card Plus system and as of 1996, 190 companies participated with a resulting 90 percent of express route fares paid by these bus pass cards.(1996)

Smart card electronic payment systems can increase ridership, decrease fare evasion, and reduce administrative costs.(November 1995)

Transit AVL can improve O&M and reduce operating expenses.(November 1995)

In Manchester, UK, transit smart cards that improve data accuracy and reduce data collection costs saved $1.5 million.(September 1995)

A dynamic time-of-day parking meter pricing system in Los Angeles increased revenues by 2.5 percent and lowered the average parking meter rate by $0.19 per hour.(08/31/2015)

Variable Pricing Systems worldwide indicate an increase in transit use and improved travel times and speeds system wide (priced lanes and general purpose lanes).(February 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) smart parking system encouraged 30 percent of surveyed travelers to use transit instead of driving alone to their place of work.(June 2008)

Survey data indicate the most popular reason commuters use smart parking is that a parking spot will be available when they need it.(June 2008)

In the Washington, D.C. region, SmarTrip cards used to pay both parking fees and subway fares were considered easy to use and were rated high for usefulness.(25 March 2005)

The Washington, D.C. region Metrorail service required that SmarTrip cards be used to pay for parking at all Metrorail stations increasing the purchase of cards from 8,000 per month to 75,000 per month during the first two months.(25 March 2005)

Enabling connected vehicles to pay for priority at signalized intersections yields a benefit cost of at least 1.0 at 20 percent CV penetration and as much as 3.0 at 10 percent CV penetration when including reduced network delay for all vehicles.(08/01/2015)

Benefit-cost ratio of 6.0:1 obtained from converting high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) to high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes, adding Priced Dynamic Shoulder Lane (PDSL), MARQ2 express bus lanes, and other improvements.(January 4, 2013)

During the planned expansion of the I-15 HOT lanes in San Diego a survey of facility users found that 71 percent considered the extension fair with few differences based on ethnicity or income.(February 2011)

Variable Pricing Systems worldwide indicate an increase in transit use and improved travel times and speeds system wide (priced lanes and general purpose lanes).(February 2011)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Cordon pricing in Stockholm and Milan contributed to transit ridership increases of 4.5 percent and 5.7 percent respectively.(2011)

Navigation systems with eco-routing features can improve fuel economy by 15 percent.(January 2011)

Conversion of HOV to HOT lanes decreases express bus travel time from 25 to 8 minutes, increases bus speeds from 18 to 55 mph, and increases reliability and ridership.(January 2011)

Cordon pricing in Stockholm contributed to a 3.6 percent reduction in crashes.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Cordon pricing contributed to a 14 percent reduction in climate gases in Stockholm and a 14 percent reduction in airborne particulate matter in Milan.(2011)

In Singapore, the Electronic Road Pricing program has enabled maintaining target speeds of 45 to 65 kilometers per hour on expressways and 20 to 30 kilometers per hour on arterials.(12/01/2010)

The Stockholm congestion tax project reduced traffic congestion by 20 percent and vehicle emissions by 10 to 14 percent in the Central Business District.(12/01/2010)

In Germany, vehicle-miles traveled using cleaner trucks (Euro 4 and 5) rose 60 percent from 2 percent in 2005 to over 62 percent in 2009 because of the nationwide heavy-goods-vehicle tolling program.(12/01/2010)

After implementation of the congestion charge in London, the number of vehicles entering the charging zone decreased by 25 percent, travel speeds increased by 30 percent, trip times decreased by 14 percent, and traffic delays plummeted by 25 percent.(12/01/2010)

Conversion of an HOV lane to a HOT lane in Washington State allowed for a 3 to 19 percent increase in speeds in general purpose lanes despite a 2 to 3 percent increase in volumes in the general lanes.(November 19, 2010)

Benefit-to-cost estimates for dynamic pricing applications on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from 1.1 to 8.2.(September 2010)

In Puget Sound, variable tolling on SR-167 made more efficient use of carpool lanes without delaying buses; average speeds in general purpose lanes increased by 21 percent while average speeds in HOT lanes increased by 6 percent.(Winter 2009/2010)

CO2 emissions can be reduced up to 15 percent using in-vehicle performance monitoring systems for Eco-Driver Coaching.(September 16, 2009)

ITS pricing strategies can reduce traffic congestion and enhance the quality of service of buses.(September 2009)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Early HOV to HOT conversion projects implemented in San Diego saved I-15 FasTrak users up to 20 minutes compared to main line travelers.(August 2008)

In 2007, the Transport for London (TfL) stated that between 2003 and 2006, NOX emissions fell by 17 percent, PM10 by 24 percent and CO2 by 3 percent, with some of this improvement being attributed to the effects of better traffic flow, and the rest of the improvements, a result of improved vehicle technology.(August 2008)

In Puget Sound, planners estimated that the conversion of HOV to HOT on a nine mile section of SR-167 would allow 13 percent more vehicles to travel the SR-167 corridor daily, and increase use of HOV/HOT lanes by 38 percent.(August 2008)

In Denver, soon after the conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-25/US-36, 10 to 15 percent of all daily person trips occurred in the HOT lanes, at full highway speeds, while those in the general-purpose lanes experienced stop-and-go congestion.(August 2008)

Since introducing Electronic Road Pricing in the late 90's, Singapore has reduced weekday traffic in the "Restricted Zone" by 24 percent, resulting in an increase in the average speed of 10 kilometers per hour.(August 2008)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

In Stockholm the permanent charging program (Cordon Charging) produced improvements in the environment by reducing carbon dioxide by 10 to 14 percent, NOX by 7 percent, and particulates by 9 percent.(August 2008)

In London, the Central Congestion Charging program reduced traffic delays by 25 percent, and increased travel speeds by 30 percent in the zone.(August 2008)

In London in 2006, the Central Congestion Charging program reduced traffic entering the central London charging zone during charging hours by 21 percent.(August 2008)

Recent data in Stockholm shows that the permanent charging program, reintroduced in August 2007, has reduced traffic by 18 percent exceeding the project goal of 10 to 15 percent.(August 2008)

In the Seattle metropolitan area, a network wide variable tolling system reduced the aggregate travel demand of a targeted study group; weekly vehicle miles traveled (VMT) decreased 12 percent and travel time decreased 8 percent.(April 2008)

In the Seattle metropolitan area the net benefits of a network wide variable tolling system could exceed $28 billion over a 30-year period resulting in a benefit-to-cost ratio of 6:1.(April 2008)

Congestion charging in London resulted in pollutant emission reductions: 8 percent for oxides of nitrogen, 7 percent for airborne particulate matter, and 16 percent for carbon dioxide.(July 2007)

A study of the congestion charging scheme in central London found benefits exceeding costs by a ratio of 1.5:1 for a £5 charge and 1.7:1 for an £8 charge.(July 2007)

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, survey data collected prior to the deployment of MnPASS Express Lanes (HOT lanes) on I-394 examined travelers' willingness-to-pay to avoid congestion. (22-26 January 2006)

Survey data collected from an organization of approximately 500 businesses in London indicated that 69 percent of respondents felt that congestion charging had no impact on their business, 22 percent reported positive impacts on their business, and 9 percent reported an overall negative impact.(January 2006)

Congestion pricing in London decreases inner city traffic by about 20 percent and generates more than £97 million each year for transit improvements.(January 2006)

In California, public support for variable tolling on SR91 was initially low, but after 18 months of operations; nearly 75 percent of the commuting public expressed approval of virtually all aspects of the Express Lanes program.(June 2005)

On the Pennsylvania Turnpike, EZ-Pass participation and variable tolling were projected to decrease peak period traffic congestion at urban interchanges by 15 to 20 percent and have minimal impacts on non-turnpike diversion routes.(8 March 2004)

Value pricing has been shown to increase revenue, reduce congestion by maximizing lane capacity and reduce travel time of highway transportation.(27 February 2003)

Impacts of Transit Fare Policy Initiatives Under an Automated Fare System(Summer 2000)

Congestion

Deployment of variable rate, all-electronic, open road tolling on SR-520 Bridge near Seattle yielded $55 million of revenue in 2012.(12/02/2014)

After deployment of pricing and electronic tolling on SR 520, travel-time reliability improved by 6 to 13 minutes during peak periods on that route.(12/02/2014)

After tolling the SR 520 Bridge, mean travel speeds increased by over 10 mi/h in both directions during both peak periods.(12/02/2014)

Emissions decreased by 30 to 37.9 percent and fuel consumption decreased by 32.2 percent on the SR 520 bridge after electronic tolling was deployed.(12/02/2014)

Benefits from an initial HOT lanes deployment in Minneapolis St. Paul were maintained in the long term, while a system expansion resulted in fewer benefits, but at a much cheaper cost.(April 2013)

Full deployment of mobility applications may be capable of eliminating more than 1/3rd of the travel delay that is caused by congestion.(12/10/12)

Annual boardings for the I-85 Xpress bus service increased seven percent, more than twice as fast as Xpress bus services in other areas of the city after HOT lanes were implemented to address congestion on I-85 in Atlanta.(16 July 2012)

Cordon

A mileage-based user fee study in Minnesota generated nearly $38,000 in simulated revenue over six months.(02/01/2013)

Distance / Mileage

A mileage-based user fee study in Minnesota generated nearly $38,000 in simulated revenue over six months.(02/01/2013)

Variable Lane

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to increase person throughput 14 to 38 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce average travel times 48 to 58 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has projected benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 4:1 to 6:1.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM solution for the I-95/I-395 corridor would cost approximately $7.45 Million per year.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce fuel consumption 33 to 34 percent.(June 2014)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)