Freeway Management (159 unique benefit summaries found)

T3 Webinars

Traffic

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to increase person throughput 14 to 38 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce average travel times 48 to 58 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has projected benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 4:1 to 6:1.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM solution for the I-95/I-395 corridor would cost approximately $7.45 Million per year.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce fuel consumption 33 to 34 percent.(June 2014)

ICM diversion route strategies can reduce average delay up to 26 percent, reduce average number of stops up to 42 percent, and increase average speeds up to 9 percent on arterials with traffic signal control.(07/01/2013)

A Bluetooth travel time detection system with seven detectors was integrated into a DMS roadside traveler information system for $90,000.(04/01/2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

The use of vehicle probes allowed North Carolina and South Carolina to monitor traffic at a quarter of the cost of microwave or radar detectors.(August 12, 2010)

New Jersey Department of Transportation enhanced incident management efficiency by using I-95 Corridor Coalition’s Vehicle Probe Project data, experiencing an estimated savings of $100,000 per incident in user delay costs.(August 12, 2010)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

In Finland, a benefit-cost analysis supported the deployment of weather information controlled variable speed limits on highly trafficked road segments.(25 March 2006)

A model indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced crash fatalities by 3.2 percent during peak periods.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced delay by 0.2 minutes per trip during AM peak periods and by 0.6 minutes during PM peak periods. (4-7 June 2001)

Modeling found emissions reductions of 3.7 to 4.6 percent due to an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.(4-7 June 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

More than 99 percent of surveyed users said they benefited from information provided by an advanced transportation management system and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. (June 1999)

Evaluation Report for ITS for Voluntary Emission Reduction: An ITS Operational Test for Real-Time Vehicle Emissions Detection(May 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Compared to using connected vehicle data alone, algorithms developed to estimate the positions of unequipped vehicles can result in up to an 8 percent reduction in delay.(12/01/2013)

Ramp Closures

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

Ramp Metering

Dynamic ramp metering strategies designed to actively counter developing bottlenecks can reduce vehicle delay up to 48 percent.(06/01/2015)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to increase person throughput 14 to 38 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce average travel times 48 to 58 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has projected benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 4:1 to 6:1.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM solution for the I-95/I-395 corridor would cost approximately $7.45 Million per year.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce fuel consumption 33 to 34 percent.(June 2014)

The implementation of ramp metering in Kansas City increased corridor throughput by as much as 20 percent and improved incident clearance by an average of four minutes, with these benefits remaining consistent in the long term.(April 2013)

The Kansas City Scout program used ramp meters to improve safety on a seven mile section of I-435; before and after data indicated that ramp meters decreased crashes by 64 percent.(2012)

The Kansas City Scout program used ramp meters to improve traffic flow and reduce overall peak period travel times on a seven mile section of I-435 by 1 to 4 percent.(2012)

Active ramp metering on critical freeway segments can reduce travel time variability 24 to 37 percent.(11/03/2011 12:00:00 AM)

Initial findings from a ramp meter evaluation in Kansas City were consistent with findings in other cities that show ramp metering can reduce crashes by 26 to 50 percent.(January 2011)

Initial findings from a ramp meter evaluation in Kansas City show that ramp meters make it easier for drivers to merge and reduce overall travel times.(January 2011)

Customers increased travel speeds by 180 to 220 percent during peak times on Miami-Dade I-95 HOT lanes with significant improvements in travel time reliability.(January 21, 2011)

ICM improves center-to-center communications, traveler information, and traffic management(October 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Full ITS deployment in the Seattle area projected to reduce recurrent congestion delays by 3.2 percent and incident related delays by 50 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects personal travel time reductions of 3.7 percent for drivers and 24 percent for transit users.(May 2005)

Full deployment of comprehensive ITS strategies in Seattle are projected to reduce CO, HC, and NOx emissions by 16 percent, 17 percent and 21 percent, respectively and reduce fuel consumption by 19 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects vehicle speeds to increase by as much as 12 percent on major roadways.(May 2005)

In Salt Lake Valley, Utah a ramp metering study showed that with an 8 second metering cycle, mainline peak period delay decreased by 36 percent, or 54 seconds per vehicle.(March 2004)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that the number of commuters who supported a complete ramp meter shutdown declined significantly from 21 percent in 2000 to about 14 percent in 2001.(10 May 2002)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that freeway travel speeds decreased 5 to 10 percent and freeway travel times increased 5 to 10 percent between 2000 and 2001.(10 May 2002)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that the number of crashes recorded for the interim period with reduced ramp metering capacity was 15 percent higher that the average number of crashes measured for the previous fully metered periods. (10 May 2002)

The CORSIM simulation model has been used to estimate ramp metering speed improvements at the merge influence area under different ramp and mainline volumes, acceleration lane lengths, and number of lanes conditions, and the simulated outputs show that the average speeds at the merge influence areas increase when on-ramp junctions are metered, and that the increase is most prevalent under high traffic volumes, short acceleration lane, and low number of mainline lanes. (13-18 January 2002)

A simulation study in Minneapolis-St. Paul estimated that ramp metering decreased total system travel time by 6 to16 percent and increased average mainline speeds by 13 to 26 percent.( 13-17 January 2002)

A simulation study in Minneapolis-St. Paul estimated that ramp metering saved 2 to 55 percent of the fuel expended at each ramp.( 13-17 January 2002)

Simulations indicated that using a decision support tool to select alternative traffic control plans during non-recurring congestion in the Disney Land area of Anaheim, California could reduce travel time by 2 to 29 percent and decrease stop time by 15 to 56 percent. (December 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

Most drivers believed that traffic conditions worsened when the Minneapolis-St. Paul ramp metering system was shut down and 80 percent supported reactivation.(February 2001)

When the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was shut down, speeds fell by seven percent. (February 2001)

When the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was deactivated, crash frequency increased by 26 percent.(February 2001)

Net annual vehicle emissions increased by 1,160 tons and fuel consumption decreased by 5.5 million gallons when the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was shut down.(February 2001)

Volume decreased by 9 percent and peak period throughput was reduced by 14 percent when the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was deactivated.(February 2001)

A study found that the benefit-to-cost ratio of the Minneapolis-St. Paul ramp metering system was 15:1.(February 2001)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland increased vehicle throughput 20 percent on arterials and 6 percent on freeways.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 59 percent of respondents thought that ramp metering was very helpful or fairly helpful.(January 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland improved network travel times by 10 percent.(January 2000)

A six year evaluation of freeway ramp metering in Arizona found that that the system reduced sideswipe accidents on the mainline by smoothing traffic flow, but increased rear-end accidents on entrance ramps where vehicles were required to slow down or stop unexpectedly.(August 1999)

In Glasgow, Scotland a freeway ramp metering system installed at an entrance ramp to the M8 motorway reduced the frequency of early merging by 29 percent.(12-16 October 1998)

In the St. Paul, Minnesota region ramp metering has increased throughput by 30 percent and increased peak period speeds by 60 percent.(November 1997)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

A 1995 North American survey of traffic management centers using ramp metering, identified reductions of 15 to 50 percent in freeway crashes.(June 1995)

In Glasglow, Scotland, ITS evaluation reports show that ramp metering can improve freeway capacity by 5 to 13 percent.(1994-1998)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Connected automated vehicles may increase freeway capacity in Germany by 30 percent by 2070, while more conservative driving automated vehicles may have a slight negative impact in the interim period.(October 29 - November 2)

Cooperative V2V alert system can reduce overall travel times by 20 percent.

Active Traffic Management system installed along I-66 reduces travel times by up to 11 percent and reduces vehicle delay by up to 68 percent(April 7, 2016)

Controlled motorways offer improved travel time reliability and less stress for drivers, but in some cases costs can outweigh benefits.(November 2004)

Eco-Lanes Management

Low Emissions Zones concept can potentially reduce emissions by 15-18 percent.(January 2015)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

High-Occupancy Vehicle Facilities

Gross toll revenue of the I-10 ExpressLanes was $8,918,985 and I-110 ExpressLanes was $18,704,961 in the first 16 months of HOT lane operation.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes on I-10 and I-110 in Los Angeles was projected to provide transit riders a travel time benefit of $9,186,074 over a 10-year period.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

HOT lane conversion improved travel times during peak periods and influenced 49 percent of new I-85 Xpress bus riders to start using transit.(03/21/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Benefits from an initial HOT lanes deployment in Minneapolis St. Paul were maintained in the long term, while a system expansion resulted in fewer benefits, but at a much cheaper cost.(April 2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Lane Control

During an incident, motorists can see up to a 50 percent savings in travel time with MDOT’s Flex Route lane control system.(11/13/2017)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

Pricing

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

Deployment of variable rate, all-electronic, open road tolling on SR-520 Bridge near Seattle yielded $55 million of revenue in 2012.(12/02/2014)

Data indicates that total saved value of travel time on variable tolling lanes can reach 11 percent of the total value of time spent travelling compared to uniform tolling rates.(03/02/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Conversion of an HOV lane to a HOT lane in Washington State allowed for a 3 to 19 percent increase in speeds in general purpose lanes despite a 2 to 3 percent increase in volumes in the general lanes.(November 19, 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Benefit-to-cost estimates for dynamic pricing applications on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from 1.1 to 8.2.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Traffic volumes doubled from 10,000 trips per week to 20,000 trips per week in HOT lanes without negative effects on speeds.(November 2006)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

Value pricing has been shown to increase revenue, reduce congestion by maximizing lane capacity and reduce travel time of highway transportation.(27 February 2003)

Queue Warning

End-of-Queue Warning system installed along I-35 in Texas estimated to have reduced crashes by 44 percent, resulting in $1.36 million in reduced crash costs (over a one year period).(01/10/2016)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Speed Harmonization

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Eco-Speed Harmonization and Eco-Connected Adaptive Cruise Control applications show results of up to a 22 percent reduction in energy and a 33 percent reduction in travel time.

Tractor-trailer platooning enabled by V2V communications demonstrates fuel savings up to 9.7 percent.(September 2014)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

Variable Speed Limits

Variable speed limit pilot found to be effective reducing the number of overall crashes. (08/09/2015)

Variable speed limit systems reduced the number and severity of crashes at three pilot sites in Texas. Benefit-to-Cost ratios ranged from 7:1 to 14:1.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Advisory Variable Speed Limit System in Portland, Oregon reduces speed variation and the number of crashes in the area.(May 18, 2015)

In Smart Zone work zones, 71 percent of local resident survey respondents found variable speed limit signs useful.(January 28, 2015)

Variable speed limits have safety benefits and a homogenizing effect, but a German study found no increase in freeway capacity.(January 13, 2013)

Variable Speed Limit model yields up to 42.4 percent reduction on number of vehicle stops and 17.6 percent reduction on the average travel time.(01/01/2013)

Implementing variable mandatory speed limits on four lanes with the optional use of the hard shoulder as a running lane resulted in a 55.7 percent decrease in the number of personal injury accidents on a major motorway in England.(January 2011)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

A Variable Speed Limit (VSL) system on the I-270/I-255 loop around St. Louis reduced the crash rate by 4.5 to 8 percent, due to more homogenous traffic speed in congested areas and slower traffic speed upstream.(October 2010)

17 percent reduction in NOx on "Ozone Action Days" with Variable Speed Limits.(September, 2006)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, variable speed limits reduced vehicle speeds by up to 5 km/h and contributed to smoother traffic flow during peak periods.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

ICM improves center-to-center communications, traveler information, and traffic management(October 2010)

Dynamic Message Signs

Expanding permanent DMS operations to include information on I-70 work zones has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 6.9:1.(December 2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

When link travel times posted on DMS are twice as long as typical travel times, drivers begin to favor alternate routes.(09/27/2012)

Decision Support System scenarios modeled on the ICM Corridor in Dallas Texas show travel time savings of 9 percent on arterials when vehicles divert from the freeway.(August 1, 2012)

Ninety-four percent of travelers took the action indicated by the DMSs in rural Missouri and drivers were very satisfied by the accuracy of the information provided.(December 2011)

Rural DMSs providing detour information for a full, 3 day bridge closure provided over $21,000 in benefits to motorists in Missouri.(December 2011)

Vehicle speeds decreased significantly in work zones where DMSs were used to inform drivers upstream.(December 2011)

In St. Louis County, Missouri, full closure of portions of I-64 for two years allowed for an accelerated construction schedule, saving taxpayers between $93 million and $187 million.(November 2011)

Benefit-to-cost ratios for six dynamic message signs on two freeways ranged from 1.38:1 to 16.95:1 based on total crashes; however, hazard warnings posted during incidents were ineffective at reducing secondary crashes.(12/17/2010)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

Changeable Message Signs in the Bay Area that displayed highway and transit trip times and departure times for the next train influenced 1.6 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was less than 15 minutes, and 7.9 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was greater than 20 minutes.(September 2009)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Houston, a survey of motorists found that 85 percent of respondents changed their route after viewing real-time travel time information on freeway dynamic message signs.(May 2005)

Deployment experiences document the importance of traveler information and list top sources of traveler information.(2005)

In Southeast Pennsylvania, survey results indicated that users of the SmarTraveler website were more likely to use the service again compared to users of the SmarTraveler telephone service.(19-22 May 2003)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, travel times and alternative route information posted on dynamic message signs prompted 12 to 14 percent of drivers to divert onto less congested alternative routes.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

During the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, a survey about the CommuterLink Web site showed that 98 percent of visitors and 97 percent of residents who used the Web site said it worked well for them(April 2003)

Evaluation of Variable Message Signs in Wisconsin: Driver Survey(May 2002)

Simulations indicated that using a decision support tool to select alternative traffic control plans during non-recurring congestion in the Disney Land area of Anaheim, California could reduce travel time by 2 to 29 percent and decrease stop time by 15 to 56 percent. (December 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

A model indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced crash fatalities by 3.2 percent during peak periods.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced delay by 0.2 minutes per trip during AM peak periods and by 0.6 minutes during PM peak periods. (4-7 June 2001)

Modeling found emissions reductions of 3.7 to 4.6 percent due to an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.(4-7 June 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

Simulation revealed that a freeway management system in Fargo, North Dakota could reduce network travel times by 8 percent and increase speeds by 8 percent when DMS are used to warn drivers of incidents.(6-10 August 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

An evaluation of traffic information used by travelers in the Detroit area, in 2000, found that most drivers perceived commercial radio as "more reliable" than television or dynamic message sign information. (May 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 40 percent changed route due to DMS recommendations.(January 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

In Japan, real-time alternative-route travel time information posted on dynamic message signs contributed to a 3.7 percent divergence rate during periods of congestion, saving detoured motorists an average of 9.8 minutes per vehicle.(12-16 October 1998)

Evaluation Report for ITS for Voluntary Emission Reduction: An ITS Operational Test for Real-Time Vehicle Emissions Detection(May 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Highway Advisory Radio

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

During the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, a survey about the CommuterLink Web site showed that 98 percent of visitors and 97 percent of residents who used the Web site said it worked well for them(April 2003)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

In-Vehicle Systems

Evaluation of an In-Vehicle Active Traffic and Demand Management System finds that 73 percent of participants favor the technology(04/04/2016)

Presence of pedestrian countdown signals in Michigan reduces crashes involving pedestrians age 65 years and older by 65 percent.(11/15/2015)

Intelligent speed control applications that smooth traffic flow during congested conditions can reduce fuel consumption by 10 to 20 percent without drastically affecting overall travel times.(2009)

High-Occupancy Vehicle Facilities

Violations fell from 20 percent to 9 percent with implementation of transponder-based electronic tolling(November 2006)

Speed Enforcement

Increase in automatic speed enforcement camera coverage in Finland resulted in a benefit-cost ratia of 3.91 and over $15 million in annual safety benefits.(May/June 2010)

A speed enforcement camera demonstration program on Loop 101 Freeway in Scottsdale, Arizona reduced the average speed by about 9 mph, reduced the speed distribution, and reduced the number of speeding drivers by at least a 67.5 percent decrease in the proportion of the number of faster drivers.(November, 2007)

In Scottsdale, Arizona, a speed enforcement camera demonstration program on a freeway decreased the number of target crashes by 44 to 54 percent, injury crashes by 28 to 48 percent, and Proptery Damage Only crashes by 46 to 56 percent.(November, 2007)

Seventy (70) percent of survey respondents in Great Britain thought that automated speed and red-light enforcement cameras were a useful way to reduce accidents and save lives. ( 11 February 2003)

Automated speed and red-light enforcement reduced the percentage of vehicles exceeding the speed limit by 58 percent, the number of persons killed or seriously injured by 4 to 65 percent, and the personal injury accident rate by 6 percent.( 11 February 2003)

Evaluation studies showed that roadways equipped with automated speed enforcement can reduce the number of speeding vehicles by 27 to 78 percent.(13-17 January 2002)

In Texas, police who used remote camera/radar systems to enforce work zone speed limits noted improved safety to officers, but expressed some concern over effectiveness in identifying speeding vehicles.(13-17 January 2002)

Automated speed and red light enforcement lowered crash frequency by 14 percent, decreased crash injuries by 19 to 98 percent, and fatalities 7 to 83 percent.(2001)

Automated speed enforcement in England has increased capacity by 5 to 10 percent. (August 1999)

An automated speed enforcement system deployed in Korea reduced crash frequency by 28 percent and decreased crash fatalities by 60 percent. (12-16 October 1998)

A survey of travelers in the Washington, DC region indicated that 86 percent favored the use of video technology to enforce aggressive driving laws.(11 September 1998)

In England, a variable speed limit system on the M25 freeway increases average travel times, but promotes proper following distances between vehicles and creates smoother traffic flow.(14 March 1997)

Automated speed enforcement systems decreased injury accidents by 5 to 26 percent.(1997)

Increase of Traffic Safety by Surveillance of Speed Limits with Automatic Radar-Devices on a Dangerous Section of a German Autobahn: A Long-Term Investigation(1984)