Traffic Incident Management (87 unique benefit summaries found)

T3 Webinars

Over a 20-year lifecycle, NG9-1-1 would likely cost about the same as maintaining the status quo of the current 9-1-1 system, but deliver 80 percent additional value.(03/05/2009)

Full ITS deployment in the Seattle area projected to result in 8 percent fewer fatal crashes, and 3 percent fewer injury and property damage only crashes annually.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in the Seattle area projected to reduce recurrent congestion delays by 3.2 percent and incident related delays by 50 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects personal travel time reductions of 3.7 percent for drivers and 24 percent for transit users.(May 2005)

Full deployment of comprehensive ITS strategies in Seattle are projected to reduce CO, HC, and NOx emissions by 16 percent, 17 percent and 21 percent, respectively and reduce fuel consumption by 19 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects vehicle speeds to increase by as much as 12 percent on major roadways.(May 2005)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Innovations in Transportation and Air Quality: Twelve Exemplary Projects(1996)

Call Boxes

Georgia’s Call Box Project: Evaluation and Future Deployment Recommendations(4-7 June 2001)

In Georgia, call boxes installed on a 39-mile section of I-185 were estimated to eliminate one injury per year, and one fatality every five years.(May 2000)

Detectors

Overall benefit-cost ratio for traffic incident management-oriented ITS program estimated to be 3.16.(July 31, 2015)

An automated incident detection procedure developed for arterials detected 75 percent of reported incidents and had a false alarm rate of 26 percent.(August 1, 2012)

Delay savings benefit-to-cost ratio of 8.5:1 found with deployment of a traffic incident management system in Knoxville, Tennessee (05/01/2012)

New Jersey Department of Transportation enhanced incident management efficiency by using I-95 Corridor Coalition’s Vehicle Probe Project data, experiencing an estimated savings of $100,000 per incident in user delay costs.(August 12, 2010)

Using sensors and traffic cameras for incident identification and verification yielded benefit-to-cost ratios of 6.54:1 and 12.47:1, respectively.(April 2007)

TMC staff in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania found real-time traffic information useful and noted that it improved coverage for incident management.(5 September 2002)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

Imaging/Video

Overall benefit-cost ratio for traffic incident management-oriented ITS program estimated to be 3.16.(July 31, 2015)

Delay savings benefit-to-cost ratio of 8.5:1 found with deployment of a traffic incident management system in Knoxville, Tennessee (05/01/2012)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

Using sensors and traffic cameras for incident identification and verification yielded benefit-to-cost ratios of 6.54:1 and 12.47:1, respectively.(April 2007)

In Monroe County, New York, the closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera provided traffic operators the availability of visual information so they can examine real time incident conditions and provide a higher and more responsive quality of service to the traveling public.(August 2006)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

In Japan, a real-time incident detection and warning system installed on a dangerous curve on the Hanshin Expressway decreased the rate of secondary crashes by 50 percent.(October 1997)

In Brooklyn, an incident management system on the Gowanus and Prospect Expressways used CCTV, highway advisory radio, dynamic message signs, and a construction information hotline to improve average incident clearance time by about one hour, a 66 percent improvement.(May 1997)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Driver confidence in traveler information improved after implementation of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system reduced fuel consumption by an estimated 2,600 gallons per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system led to an estimated delay savings of 700 vehicle-hours per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

Following deployment of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas, crash frequency was reduced by 41 percent and incident response time decreased by 20 percent.(12-16 January 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

Mayday/Automated Collision Notification

In Puget Sound, Washington, a survey of drivers equipped with in-vehicle emergency communications found that 95 percent of respondents felt "more secure" with Mayday voice communications, and 70 percent felt "more secure" with data communications.(September 1997)

Traveler Reported

Incident Management Simulation on a Freeway Corridor in Honolulu(8-12 November 1999)

The benefits of multidisciplinary TIM operations yielded an annual reduction in average incident duration of 46 minutes and in secondary crashes of 69 percent in Atlanta Georgia.(January 2009)

The benefits of multidisciplinary TIM operations yielded an annual reduction in incident duration of 28.6 percent and in vehicle-hours of delay of approximately 30 million in Maryland.(January 2009)

In Broward County, Florida, the 2006 analysis for the SMART SunGuide TMC roadway and incident clearance times showed reductions of 18 percent and 4 percent respectively over 2005.(January 2007)

Incident Management tool implemented in San Francisco Bay area reduced incident durations by approximately 15 percent, with an annual delay savings of 210,000 hours. (September, 2006)

Full ITS deployment in the Seattle area projected to result in 8 percent fewer fatal crashes, and 3 percent fewer injury and property damage only crashes annually.(May 2005)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Driver confidence in traveler information improved after implementation of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system reduced fuel consumption by an estimated 2,600 gallons per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system led to an estimated delay savings of 700 vehicle-hours per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

Following deployment of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas, crash frequency was reduced by 41 percent and incident response time decreased by 20 percent.(12-16 January 1997)

In Paris, France, incident management resulted in a nine-minute reduction in response time(1994-1998)

Automatic Vehicle Location / Computer-Aided Dispatch

30 to 120 second decrease in time for incident data to be entered with CAD-TMC integration.(July 2006)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, an ambulance provider increased its efficiency by 10 to 15 percent using AVL/CAD to improve route guidance.(January 1997)

Response Routing

The annual operating cost to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies was estimated at $1.2 million.(June 2010)

A program designed to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 10:1.(June 2010)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, an ambulance provider increased its efficiency by 10 to 15 percent using AVL/CAD to improve route guidance.(January 1997)

Service Patrols

Overall benefit-cost ratio for traffic incident management-oriented ITS program estimated to be 3.16.(July 31, 2015)

Delay savings benefit-to-cost ratio of 8.5:1 found with deployment of a traffic incident management system in Knoxville, Tennessee (05/01/2012)

In 2009, the Washington State DOT Incident Response Team was able to clear 98 percent of incidents in under an hour and nearly three quarters in less than 15 minutes.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

The St. Louis Motorist Assist program had a benefit-cost ratio of 38.25:1, with annual secondary crashes lowered by 1,082 and annual congestion costs lowered by $1,130,000.(February 2010)

An Arterial Service Patrol deployed during the re-construction of I-64 in St. Louis had a benefit-cost ratio of 8.3:1, lowered secondary crashes by 183 per year, and reduced annual congestion costs by $1,034,000.(December, 2009)

An Arterial Service Patrol deployed during the re-construction of I-64 in St. Louis had a benefit-cost ratio of 8.3:1, lowered secondary crashes by 183 per year, and reduced annual congestion costs by $1,034,000.(December, 2009)

Michigan DOT Freeway Courtesy Patrol evaluation estimates benefit cost ratio of 15:1 and substantial savings in traffic delays and harmful emissions.(February 2009)

Benefit-Cost Ratios of up to 25.8:1 have been produced in regions with aggressive Freeway Service Patrol programs.(November 2008)

Northern Virginia's freeway safety service patrol (SSP) had an estimated annual savings of $6.49 million in motorist delay and fuel consumption resulting in a benefit-cost ratio of 5.4:1.(2008)

The average duration of incidents assisted by the Northern Virginia (NOVA) Safety Service Patrol (SSP) was 17.3 percent shorter than the duration for matching incidents without NOVA SSP assistance.(2008)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

The safety service patrol (SSP) in Hampton Roads, Virginia decreased the average incident duration by 70.7 percent.(2007)

The safety service patrol (SSP) in Hampton Roads, Virginia produced an annual benefit of $11 million in fuel savings and reductions in motorist delay.(2007)

The benefit-cost ratio for the safety service patrol (SSP) in Hampton Roads, Virginia was 4.71:1.(2007)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced the average incident duration from 67 minutes to 21 minutes, saving 7.25 million vehicle-hours of delay over one year. (August 2006)

In Georgia, the HERO motorist assistance patrol program and NaviGAtor incident management activities saved more than 187 million dollars yielding a benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.4:1.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the Navigator incident management program reduced secondary crashes from an expected 676 to 210 in the twelve months ending April 2004.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced annual fuel consumption by 6.83 million gallons, and contributed to decreased emissions: 2,457 tons less Carbon monoxide, 186 tons less hydrocarbons, and 262 tons less Nitrous oxides.(August 2006)

In Atlanta, satisfaction with motorist assistance patrols ranged from 93 to greater than 95 percent in two separate surveys of drivers who were already aware of the service.(August 2006)

Freeway Service Patrol: "About FSP", and "Facts at a Glance" (Web Site)(22 June 2006)

In Florida, the Road Ranger Service Patrol program saved over 1.7 million gallons of fuel by eliminating over one million vehicle-hours of delay in 2004.(November 2005)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

Break even point calculated for an incident response program: reducing 30 seconds per incident results in $711,300 reduction in costs of delay, equivalent to the cost of operating the incident response program for a year.(June 2004)

In Utah, incident management teams in Salt Lake Valley area decreased incident duration by approximately 20 minutes per incident on three major interstates.(March 2004)

In 2002, the Maryland CHART highway incident management program reduced delay by about 30 million vehicle hours and saved about 5 million gallons of fuel.(November 2003)

In 2002 the Maryland State CHART highway incident management system facilitated a 28.6 percent reduction on the average incident duration leading to an estimated 377 fewer secondary incidents. (November 2003)

A study of the Coordinated Highways Action Response Team in Maryland found that the system reduced incident duration and saved approximately 4.1 million gallons of fuel in 2000.(14-17 October 2002)

A study of the Coordinated Highways Action Response Team in Maryland found that the system reduced average incident duration by 57 percent in 2000.(14-17 October 2002)

In Oregon, an analysis of archived incident data showed that freeway service patrol programs that expand from part-time to full-time operations can reduce incident duration by 15 to 30 percent.(6/30/2001)

In Oregon, an analysis of archived incident data showed that freeway service patrol programs that expand from part-time to full-time operations can reduce the average cost of a delay-causing incident to travelers by 36 to 66 percent.(6/30/2001)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

In 1997, the Maryland CHART highway incident management program reduced delay by approximately 15.6 million vehicle hours and saved about 5.85 million gallons of fuel.(May 2000)

In 1997, the Maryland CHART highway incident management program facilitated a 35 percent reduction in the average incident duration which led to an estimated 337 fewer secondary incidents. (May 2000)

The Hoosier Helper program freeway service patrol program in Northwest Indiana had a projected benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.7:1 for daytime operations, and 13.3:1 for 24 hour operations.(September/October 1999)

Freeway Services Patrols: A State of the Practice(11-15 January 1998)

Incident Management: Challenges, Strategies, and Solutions for Advancing Safety and Roadway Efficiency(February 1997)

In Virginia, the deployment of a freeway service patrols was positively received by the public; Virginia DOT received hundreds of “thank you” letters.(1997)

An initial evaluation of the Maryland CHART program indicated that lane sensors and freeway video cameras in the coverage area supported incident management and contributed to a 5 percent reduction in non-recurrent congestion delay.(May 1996)

Innovations in Transportation and Air Quality: Twelve Exemplary Projects(1996)

Incident Management via Courtesy Patrol: Evaluation of a Pilot Program in Colorado(22-28 January 1995)

Dynamic Message Signs

Overall benefit-cost ratio for traffic incident management-oriented ITS program estimated to be 3.16.(July 31, 2015)

Delay savings benefit-to-cost ratio of 8.5:1 found with deployment of a traffic incident management system in Knoxville, Tennessee (05/01/2012)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

The annual operating cost to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies was estimated at $1.2 million.(June 2010)

A program designed to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 10:1.(June 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced the average incident duration from 67 minutes to 21 minutes, saving 7.25 million vehicle-hours of delay over one year. (August 2006)

In Georgia, the HERO motorist assistance patrol program and NaviGAtor incident management activities saved more than 187 million dollars yielding a benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.4:1.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the Navigator incident management program reduced secondary crashes from an expected 676 to 210 in the twelve months ending April 2004.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced annual fuel consumption by 6.83 million gallons, and contributed to decreased emissions: 2,457 tons less Carbon monoxide, 186 tons less hydrocarbons, and 262 tons less Nitrous oxides.(August 2006)

In Atlanta, satisfaction with motorist assistance patrols ranged from 93 to greater than 95 percent in two separate surveys of drivers who were already aware of the service.(August 2006)

Simulation revealed that a freeway management system in Fargo, North Dakota could reduce network travel times by 8 percent and increase speeds by 8 percent when DMS are used to warn drivers of incidents.(6-10 August 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Incident Management Simulation on a Freeway Corridor in Honolulu(8-12 November 1999)

In Japan, a real-time incident detection and warning system installed on a dangerous curve on the Hanshin Expressway decreased the rate of secondary crashes by 50 percent.(October 1997)

In Brooklyn, an incident management system on the Gowanus and Prospect Expressways used CCTV, highway advisory radio, dynamic message signs, and a construction information hotline to improve average incident clearance time by about one hour, a 66 percent improvement.(May 1997)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Driver confidence in traveler information improved after implementation of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system reduced fuel consumption by an estimated 2,600 gallons per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system led to an estimated delay savings of 700 vehicle-hours per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

Following deployment of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas, crash frequency was reduced by 41 percent and incident response time decreased by 20 percent.(12-16 January 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

Highway Advisory Radio

Incident Management Simulation on a Freeway Corridor in Honolulu(8-12 November 1999)

In Brooklyn, an incident management system on the Gowanus and Prospect Expressways used CCTV, highway advisory radio, dynamic message signs, and a construction information hotline to improve average incident clearance time by about one hour, a 66 percent improvement.(May 1997)

In-Vehicle Systems

Incident scene guidance and alerts through CV-applications can potentially reduce network delay up to 14 percent.