Cost

Nineteen metropolitan North Seattle, Washington city signal systems were integrated at a cost of $1,755,000.

From the Seattle MMDI Evaluation Report: Section 3.3.1 ATMS Signal Integration Evaluation


30 May 2000
Seattle,Washington,United States


Summary Information

The North Seattle Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) was enhanced to allow the integration of 19 metropolitan North Seattle, Washington, city signal systems. The enhancement also included interconnection with the Traffic Control Centers (TCCs) of nine cities, three transit agencies, and Washington State DOT's arterial signal and freeway ramp metering systems as well as the East and South Seattle ATMSs. The ATMS also collected regional traffic data including traffic volumes, occupancy, speeds, surveillance video/snapshots, incident information, and signal system status. The cost of customizing software applications to make them compatible with the communications system network backbone was a major driver in the cost of the system. In addition, the costs of installing traffic detection devices, computer work stations, and communications hardware equipment were significant.

The following table presented in the report provides additional detail on the North Seattle ATMS Cost Estimate.

Equipment Description
Capital Costs
O&M
Detection Devices (budget figure)
$ 200,000
Network/Database Server
$ 56,883
MIST Server
$ 20,050
HTML Server
$ 18,472
Communications/Device Driver Server
$ 37,411
Spare Server
$ 30,168
Miscellaneous Equipment
$ 22,960
Operator Interface
$ 10,093
Communications Equipment
$ 8,926
NTCIP Computer & Equipment
$ 49,834
Commercial Software
$ 8,047
Annual Hardware O&M @ 10% of Capital Cost
$ 37,955
33% Share of Software Development
$ 653,462
33% Share of Pre-Design
$ 247,367
33% Share of Design
$ 289,689
33% Share of Management Reserve/Contingencies
$ 88,163
33% Share of City of Seattle Coordination
$ 13,333
33% Share of ATMS Local Agency Coordination (1 FTE)
$ 34,168
33% Share of ATMS System Administration (1 FTE)
$ 34,168
33% Share of ATMS System Operations (1 FTE)
$ 34,168
Totals
$ 1,754,858
$ 140,459

Where the "33% share" figures are shown, North Seattle ATMS costs were shared at 33.3 percent of the total ATMS system cost.



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Source

Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Evaluation Report

Author: Jensen, M., et al. (SAIC, Battelle, Mitretek, and Volpe)

Published By: Federal Highway Administration, U.S. DOT

Prepared by SAIC for the U.S. DOT

Source Date: 30 May 2000

EDL Number: 13071

Other Reference Number: Report No. FHWA-OP-00-019

URL: https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/2943

System Cost

Capital Cost: $1,754,858 ($200K for detection devices) (1998).

O&M cost: $140,459 (1998).

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Costs From This Source

An advanced parking information system was deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative for $925,000; maintenance costs of the system hardware were estimated at 7% of the hardware capital costs.

Bus tracking capability was added to the Metro Online Web site as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative at a cost of $333,000.

Nineteen metropolitan North Seattle, Washington city signal systems were integrated at a cost of $1,755,000.

Software development was the key cost driver for the bus arrival and departure information system deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.

The total capital cost of the Seattle MMDI emergency operations centers project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700; O&M costs were approximately 5% of the equipment costs.

Benefits From This Source

A model determined that incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington could decrease the number of stops by 5.6 percent.

A model found that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington would help reduce the number of expected crashes by 2.5 percent and the frequency of fatal crashes by 1.1 percent.

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.

Simulation results indicated that vehicle emissions could be reduced by two percent if arterial traffic flow data were included in the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington.

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.

Lessons From This Source

Develop long-range plans to ensure the success and continuity of advanced traveler information systems.

Involve the private sector in the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Use an appropriate procurement mechanism to support the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Cost ID: 2003-00012