Benefit

Eco-Signal Operations applications could provide up to 11 percent decrease in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

Detailed modeling and evaluation results of the Eco-Signal Operations Operational Scenario defined by the Applications for the Environment: Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) Program


January 26, 2015
Mountain View; California; United States


Summary Information

This study performed modeling of the Eco-Signal Operations Operational Scenario defined by the Applications for the Environment: Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) Program. The Operational Scenario constitutes four applications that are designed to provide environmental benefits to the users of connected vehicle technology on arterials:

1. Eco-Approach and Departure at Signalized Intersections
2. Eco-Traffic Signal Timing
3. Eco-Traffic Signal Priority
4. Connected Eco-Driving.

The applications use the data available in a connected vehicle environment to help reduce fuel consumption and emissions by providing driving feedback, speed advice, granting priority to freight and transit vehicles and by optimizing the signal timings on the roadway.

Methodology

Simulation and modeling of the applications was conducted using a 27-intersection, 6.5 mile segment of the El Camino Real in Northern California that connects Palo Alto and Mountain View. The Paramics microsimulation tool was used to simulate and analyze the impacts of each of the applications. The applications were first each modeled individually and were then combined to function simultaneously within the same modeling environment to assess their compatibility. The model was calibrated against field data of roadway geometry, traffic origin-destination (OD) matrix, vehicle mix, vehicle demand and traffic signal settings for the year 2005.

Algorithms tailored to each individual application were implemented. A variety of scenarios were modeled to characterize the detailed behavior of the applications by varying several parameters, such as vehicle demand, percentage of trucks, communication ranges and delay, fleet mix, and most importantly the connected vehicle OBE (onboard equipment) penetration rates (which varied from 20 percent to 100 percent). Results were then compared with a baseline model that contained no connected vehicle application deployments.

Key Findings

1. Eco-Approach and Departure at Signalized Intersections
  • 2 percent to 8 percent energy savings were observed, with greater benefits resulting from increased connected vehicle penetration rates.
2. Eco-Traffic Signal Timing
  • 1 percent to 5.5 percent emissions reductions were observed, with greater benefits resulting from increased connected vehicle penetration rates.
3. Eco-Traffic Signal Priority
  • 1 percent to 4 percent fuel savings for freight vehicles and 2 percent to 4 percent fuel savings for transit vehicles were observed, with greater benefits resulting from increased connected vehicle penetration rates.
4. Connected Eco-Driving
  • 1 percent to 18 percent emissions reductions, and 1 percent to 6 percent fuel savings were observed for all vehicles, with greater benefits resulting from increased connected vehicle penetration rates.
5. Combined Applications
  • 11 percent improvement in fuel consumption/CO2 emissions, and 15 percent to 25 percent improvement in emissions of other resultant pollutants were observed, with greater benefits resulting from increased connected vehicle penetration rates.
  • The individual results were not additive but no one application significantly hindered the other applications.
  • Passenger vehicle benefits plateaued at about a 65 percent OBE penetration rate.

Benefit Comments

No comments posted to date

Comment on this Benefit

To comment on this summary, fill in the information below and click on submit. An asterisk (*) indicates a required field. Your name and email address, if provided, will not be posted, but are to contact you, if needed to clarify your comments.



Source

Eco-Signal Operations Modeling Report

Author: Balaji Yelchuru, Sean Fitzgerel, Sudeeksha Murari, Matt Barth, Travis Waller, Vinayak Dixit, Guoyuan Wu, Haitao Xia, Sashank Singuluri, Mellissa Duell, Kanok Boriboonsomsin, Stanley He, Kasun Wijayaratna, Tuo Mao

Published By: U.S. Department of Transportation ITS Joint Program Office-HOIT 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20590

Source Date: January 26, 2015

URL: https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/3537

Rating

Average User Rating

0 ( ratings)

Rate this Benefit

(click stars to rate)


Typical Deployment Locations

Metropolitan Areas

Keywords

None defined

Benefit ID: 2015-01039