Cost

An advanced highway-rail intersection warning system was deployed for just over $350,000 as part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.

From the San Antonio MMDI Evaluation Report: Section7: Improved Highway Rail Information


May 2000
San Antonio,Texas,United States


Summary Information

The Advanced Warning for Railroad Delays (AWARD) project was implemented as part of the San Antonio, Texas, Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative (MMDI). The project consisted of Doppler radar and acoustic sensors deployed upstream and downstream at selected crossings to detect the presence, speed, and length of oncoming trains as they approach grade crossings. The non-intrusive devices were installed on poles along city or state right-of-way alleviating any involvement with the railroad property who was reluctant to participate in the project because of liability reasons. Data were transmitted to the TransGuide Operations Center where the data were analyzed and railroad delay information was communicated to travelers on existing dynamic message signs and other traveler information services such as in-vehicle units distributed as part of the San Antonio MMDI project. The total project cost was $350,785 and annual operations and maintenance (O&M) costs were $33,808.

Project component costs are provided in the table below. The AWARD train sensor cost is for six sensors and includes communications hardware for links to TransGuide. The cost for the AWARD leased lines is for six phone lines.


Equipment Description
Deployment Costs
Annual O&M Costs
AWARD Train Sensors (6)
$55,164
Development Labor Costs
$230,490
33% Share of AWARD/KIOSK/IVN Master computer
$5,131
20% SWRI Development Labor Costs
$60,000
AWARD Sensor Maintenance
$2,753
AWARD Leased Phone Lines (6)
$3,552
4% Share of 25 TransGuide Personnel
$20,665
4% Share of Software Maintenance and Upgrades
$5,904
4% Share of Hardware Maintenance and Upgrades
$934
Totals
$350,785
$33,808


Click here for a conceptual diagram of the AWARD system for the Fredericksburg Road and Woodlawn Avenue crossing.

See Also:
Advanced Warning for Railroad Delays in San Antonio: Lessons Learned from the Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative, Prepared for the U.S. DOT, October 2000. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov//JPODOCS/REPTS_TE//13284.html


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Source

Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative: San Antonio Evaluation Report - Final Draft

Author: Carter, M., et al.

Published By: Federal Highway Administration, U.S. DOT

Prepared by SAIC for the U.S. DOT

Source Date: May 2000

EDL Number: 12883

Other Reference Number: Report No. FHWA-OP-00-017

URL: https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/2893

System Cost

Deployment Costs: $350,785 (1998).

Annual O&M Costs: $33,808 (1998).

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Costs From This Source

An advanced highway-rail intersection warning system was deployed for just over $350,000 as part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.

In-vehicle navigation units and real-time traveler information software development were the main cost drivers for the San Antonio TransGuide MMDI project to improve operations at several public agencies.

Over half of the $3.25 million cost for the San Antonio Lifelink advanced telemedicine project was attributed to reseach and development.

The integrated freeway/incident management system covering 28.9 miles in San Antonio was deployed for approximately $26.6 million.

Benefits From This Source

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent.

In San Antonio, Texas, 60 percent of drivers of transit vehicles equipped with in-vehicle navigation devices reported that they saved time and felt safer.

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.

In San Antonio, Texas, usage of a traveler information Web site increased at a rate of 19 percent per year and spiked during severe weather events.

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that drivers of vehicles with in-vehicle navigation devices could experience an 8.1 percent reduction in delay.

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that users of an improved traveler information web site would receive annual benefits of a 5.4 percent reduction in delay.

Cost ID: 2003-00043