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Crash Prevention & Safety > Highway-Rail Crossing Warning


Highway rail crossing systems use detectors, electronic warning signs and automated enforcement technologies to warn roadway traffic of approaching trains and discourage drivers from violating railroad crossing traffic controls.


A seaport technology program planned for the Port of Oakland was projected to cost $30.6 million.(01/29/2018)

The cost of a vehicle detection safety system installed at a dual track rail crossing can range from $27,500 for a radar-based system to $36,680 for an inductive loop-based system.(December 2012)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

From a cross-cutting study of seven highway-rail intersections using ITS, project cost ranged from $200,000 to $9.5 million depending on system design and functionality. (December 2001)

An advanced highway-rail intersection warning system was deployed for just over $350,000 as part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.(May 2000)

Junction Boxes - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Preformed Inductive Loop - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Radar Mast Extension - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Loop Detector Electronics - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Radar Electronics - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Junction Boxes - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Cabling - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Radar Sensor - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Mast Cable - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Cabling - Capital cost/unit - $2 - Lifetime - 10 years(December 2012)

Rail Crossing Pedestrian Warning Signal, Gates - Capital cost/unit - $11200 - O&M cost/unit - $296 - Lifetime - 7 years(5 August 2004)

Rail Crossing Controller - Capital cost/unit - $11200 - O&M cost/unit - $296 - Lifetime - 7 years(5 August 2004)

Rail Crossing Pedestrian Warning Signal, Gates - Capital cost/unit - $11200 - O&M cost/unit - $296 - Lifetime - 7 years(5 August 2004)

Alternating blank out signs installed at rail crossings near Denver resulted in a 61.3 percent reduction in crashes. (01/02/2014)

Pedestrian gate presence reduces violation propensity at rail crossings, providing public safety benefits.(04/01/2013)

In Los Angeles, California, the installation of a "second train coming" warning system at a light rail transit grade crossing reduced risky behavior of pedestrians and surveyed pedestrians felt that safety was improved.(November 2002)

In Baltimore, a "second train coming" warning system decreased the frequency of the most common risky behavior at crossings (i.e., drivers that crossed the tracks after the protection gates began to ascend from the first train before the protection gates could be redeployed for the second train) by 26 percent.(November 2002)

In San Antonio, a modeling study found that if traffic congestion were to increase by 25 percent, posting nearby railroad crossing closing delays on freeway dynamic message signs would reduce crashes by 8.7 percent.(October 2000)

In San Antonio, a modeling study found that if traffic congestion were to increase by 25 percent, posting nearby railroad crossing closing delays on freeway dynamic message signs would reduce total network delay by up to 6.7 percent.(October 2000)

In Ames, Iowa, an automated horn warning system that alerted motorists and pedestrians of oncoming trains reduced the area impacted by noise levels greater than 80 dBA from 171 acres to less than 6 acres.(2000)

In Ames, Iowa, a survey of area residents indicated that 78 percent preferred an automated horn warning system that reduce the area impacted by excessive noise from 171 acres to less than 6 acres. (2000)

An automated enforcement systems in California decreased highway-rail grade crossing violations by up to 92 percent.(June 1998)

Automated enforcement systems have reduced highway-rail crossing violations by 78 to 92 percent along two corridors in Los Angeles, California.(17 March 1995)

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