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Driver Assistance > Intelligent Speed Control


Intelligent speed control systems limit maximum vehicle speed via a signal from the infrastructure to an equipped vehicle.


Sixty-three (63) percent of city officials surveyed agreed that autonomous vehicles can improve the quality of life in U.S. cities.(05/24/2019)

Using a combination of surveys and modeling, researchers find that Autonomous Vehicles may increase the number of trips people take and hence traffic congestion.(2019)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can improve throughput by 21 percent with 10 percent market penetration.(June 4-7, 2018)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can reduce fuel consumption by more than 16 percent.(June 4-7, 2018)

Simulation models estimate connected automated vehicles (CAVs) can reduce net vehicle energy consumption by 11 to 55 percent.(01/07/2018)

Rapid deployment of DSRC for connected vehicles can save thousands of lives, regardless of whether a later transition to C-V2X proves advantageous.(12/12/2017)

Simulation found that connected vehicles can reduce secondary crash risk by one-third in areas with high-volume traffic and 25 percent connected vehicle market penetration.(08/05/2017)

Eco-Approach and Departure (EAD) techniques for connected vehicles can save six percent energy for trip segments within range of DSRC enabled signal controllers.(01/11/2017)

Autonomous intersection management algorithms found in simulation to reduce delays at intersections by eight times compared to conventional traffic lights.(10/1/2016)

V2I advisory speed limit systems that smooth traffic flow on urban arterials can improve fuel economy by eight percent and reduce NOx emissions by nine percent.(04/06/2016)

V2I advisory speed limit systems that smooth traffic flow on urban arterials can reduce wait time in stop-and-go traffic by 15 percent.(04/06/2016)

A simulation analysis demonstrated that connected vehicles using intersection SPaT data and Eco-Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control algorithms to regulate speed profiles can reduce fuel consumption up to 40 percent on signalized arterials. (January 2016)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Intelligent intersection signal control systems that use connected vehicle data to optimize approach and departure speeds of vehicles equipped with cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) systems can reduce fuel consumption by 21.8 percent.(02/18/2014)

Eco-cruise control (ECC) systems that use topography information to maximize engine performance can reduce fuel consumption 5 to 15 percent.(02/19/2013)

Approximately 80 percent of drivers in a large-scale field operational test felt that blind spot information systems increased safety.(11/21/2012)

Drivers surveyed on Speed Limiter and Cruise Control systems in a large-scale field operational test reported 46 and 80 percent, respectively, that the systems will improve safety.(11/21/2012)

Commercial trucks without speed limiters had a significantly higher crash rate (approximately 200 percent) compared to trucks equipped with speed limiters.(November 1, 2012)

United Kingdom study indicates that Intelligent Speed Adaptation could deliver benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 3.4 to 7.4, depending on the deployment scenarios.(September 2012)

Simulation models show that real-time on-board driver assistance systems that recommend proper following distances can improve fuel economy by approximately 10 percent.(21-25 September 2009)

CO2 emissions can be reduced up to 15 percent using in-vehicle performance monitoring systems for Eco-Driver Coaching.(September 16, 2009)

Intelligent speed control applications that smooth traffic flow during congested conditions can reduce fuel consumption by 10 to 20 percent without drastically affecting overall travel times.(2009)

Mandatory dynamic automatic controlling ISA (Intelligent Speed Assistance) could reduce fuel consumption and harmful emissions by 4 to 11 percent.(November 2008)

Mandatory dynamic automatic controlling Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) could reduce fatal crashes over the entire road network by more than 50 percent, whereas static informing ISA could still give a reduction of almost 20 percent.(November 2008)

In the central area of Chicago, a feasibility study indicated that driver assistance technologies and transit signal priority for bus rapid transit would be cost-effective.(August 2004)

A driving simulator study in Finland indicated that drivers cannot accurately assess road surface friction, thus the use of adverse road condition driver support systems can assist drivers in assessing adverse road conditions and increase safety and travel speeds. (2000)

In Torino, Italy, an automated speed control system was able to automatically adjust vehicle following distances, and use real-time TMC signal control timing data to regulate intersection approach speeds and optimize travel speeds between green lights to improve travel times by up to 10 percent.(8-12 November 1999)

In Torino, Italy, a simulation study found that an automated speed control system designed to optimize travel speeds between green lights can reduce fuel consumption by 8.3 to 13.8 percent, reduce CO2 emissions by 3.9 to 5.4 percent; reduce hydrocarbon emissions by 4.2 to 6.9 percent, and reduce NOx emissions by 7.9 to 11.3 percent.(8-12 November 1999)

In Torino, Italy, a simulation study found that an automated speed control system designed to optimize vehicle speeds between green lights can increase link capacity by 3.3 to 6.3 percent.(8-12 November 1999)

In Torino, Italy, an automated speed control system designed to optimize travel speeds between green lights was judged as good or very good by 55 percent of drivers surveyed.(8-12 November 1999)

In Sweden, test drivers of a prototype system indicated that the intelligent speed adaptation feature was well received.(August 1999)

In the south Swedish town of Eslov, most drivers participating in a field operational test reported that they preferred adaptive speed control to physical speed countermeasures such as humps, chicanes and mini-roundabouts.(12-16 October 1998)