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Emergency Management > Response & Recovery > Emergency Vehicle Signal Preemption


Signal preemption systems for emergency vehicles use sensors to detect an approaching emergency vehicle and provide a green signal to the vehicle.


In lieu of installing traditional emergency vehicle pre-emption (EVP) systems at every major intersection in San Jose, the city opted to integrate GPS fleet tracking with an existing network of advanced traffic signal controllers to save $8 million in hardware installation and maintenance costs.(4-7 June 2018)

The City of San Jose implemented a city-wide emergency vehicle preemption (EVP) system by upgrading and integrating fleet tracking systems with a network of traffic signal controllers for less than $750,000.(4-7 June 2018)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Emergency preemption equipment was deployed at several intersections in British Columbia, Canada at a cost of $4,000 (Canadian) per intersection.(November 2001)

A GPS-based satellite system costing roughly $4,000 per intersection and $2,000 per vehicle, allows Palm Beach County, Florida fire personnel to responder faster.(1 June 1997)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal preemption system - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Vehicle detection - infrared - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Vehicle detection - optical - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal preemption system - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Signal controller assembly - Capital cost/unit - $5360.96(2/4/2013)

Roadside Signal Preemption/Priority - Capital cost/unit - $5000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 10 years(06/22/2006)

Signal Controller - Capital cost/unit - $15100 - O&M cost/unit - $400 - Lifetime - 10 years(06/22/2006)

Signal Controller Upgrade for Signal Preemption - Capital cost/unit - $4100 - O&M cost/unit - $400 - Lifetime - 10 years(06/22/2006)

Inductive Loop Surveillance at Intersection - Capital cost/unit - $9000 - O&M cost/unit - $500 - Lifetime - 3 years(6/26/28/2005)

Telephone Drop - Capital cost/unit - $2900 - O&M cost/unit - $600 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/26/28/2005)

Roadside Signal Preemption/Priority - Capital cost/unit - $5600 - O&M cost/unit - $1100 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/26/28/2005)

Signal Preemption/Priority Emitter - Capital cost/unit - $1300 - O&M cost/unit - $100 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/26/28/2005)

Roadside Signal Preemption / Priority - Capital cost/unit - $5700 - Lifetime - 7 years(5 August 2004)

Roadside Signal Preemption / Priority - Capital cost/unit - $8000 - O&M cost/unit - $236.8 - Lifetime - 7 years(5 August 2004)

Signal Preemption/Priority Emitter - Capital cost/unit - $1250 - Lifetime - 10 years(8/19/2003)

Roadside Signal Preemption/Priority - Capital cost/unit - $4995 - O&M cost/unit - $1000 - Lifetime - 10 years(8/19/2003)

In lieu of installing traditional emergency vehicle pre-emption (EVP) systems at every major intersection in San Jose, the city opted to integrate GPS fleet tracking with an existing network of advanced traffic signal controllers to save $8 million in hardware installation and maintenance costs.(4-7 June 2018)

Vehicle-to-infrastructure emergency vehicle signal preemption application found to reduce emergency vehicle response time by 43 to 51 percent depending on traffic density.(January 2016)

A radio-based, GPS emergency vehicle preemption system reduced the average response times by five to seven minutes on a busy corridor.(2010)

Most communities rate benefits of emergency vehicle traffic signal pre-emption from “moderate” to “very high”.(September 2010)

Modeling indicated that emergency vehicle signal preemption at three intersections on a Virginia arterial route increased average travel time by 2.4 percent when priority was requested.(July 1999)

An emergency vehicle signal preemption system in Houston, Texas reduced emergency vehicle travel time by 16 to 23 percent.(April 1991)

In Denver, Colorado emergency vehicle signal preemption reduced response time by 14 to 23 percent.(5 October 1978)