View By Application

Emergency Management > Response & Recovery > Response Management


Response management may include the tracking of emergency vehicle fleets using automated vehicle location (AVL) technology and two-way communications between emergency vehicles and dispatchers. Integration with traffic and transit management systems enables emergency information to be shared between public and private agencies and the traveling public.


Costs for creating a statewide electronic crash data collection system range from $1.1 to 2.3 million.(2010)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

The cost of O&M at the Arizona TMC was estimated at $2 million per year.(January 2006)

In Michigan, the Flint Mass Transportation Authority budgeted $1 million to develop a central system for county-wide AVL.(June 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

The cost to design and deploy a shared regional transportation, emergency, and communications center in Austin and Travis Counties (Texas) was estimated at $5 million.(May 2004)

The total capital cost of the Seattle MMDI emergency operations centers project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700; O&M costs were approximately 5% of the equipment costs.(30 May 2000)

A GPS-based satellite system costing roughly $4,000 per intersection and $2,000 per vehicle, allows Palm Beach County, Florida fire personnel to responder faster.(1 June 1997)

Emergency Response Hardware - Capital cost/unit - $9000 - O&M cost/unit - $180(July 2005)

Hardware Upgrade for Emergency Route Planning - Capital cost/unit - $6000 - O&M cost/unit - $120(July 2005)

Emergency Response Hardware - Capital cost/unit - $12000 - O&M cost/unit - $240(July 2005)

Hardware Upgrade for Emergency Route Planning - Capital cost/unit - $10000 - O&M cost/unit - $200(July 2005)

Deployment and Installation - Capital cost/unit - $12000(January 2005)

Software Development - Capital cost/unit - $71000(January 2005)

User Documentation - Capital cost/unit - $10000(January 2005)

Acceptance Testing and Final Acceptance - Capital cost/unit - $25000(January 2005)

Training - Capital cost/unit - $11000(January 2005)

Rapid Prototype - Capital cost/unit - $15000(January 2005)

VDOT Administrative/Engineering Costs - Capital cost/unit - $37000(January 2005)

Acceptance Test Documentation - Capital cost/unit - $9000(January 2005)

Design Phase- System and Software Architecture Description - System Requirements Specification - Interface and Database Design Definition- Hardware and Network Architecture - System Test Plan - Capital cost/unit - $50000(January 2005)

As-built Documentation - Capital cost/unit - $8000(January 2005)

VPN Hardware - Capital cost/unit - $1200(January 2005)

800 MHz Two-way Radios - Capital cost/unit - $1700(30 May 2000)

Repeater Station Upgrade - Capital cost/unit - $1700(30 May 2000)

EU-mandated automated emergency call technology, eCall, is expected to reduce response time to road accidents by up to 50 percent and help save up to 1,500 lives per year.(03/27/2018)

Incident scene guidance and alerts through CV-applications can potentially reduce network delay up to 14 percent.

Survey responses from key professionals in five states indicate the following ITS technologies have the highest potential to benefit emergency transportation operations: interoperable radio communications, dynamic message signs, GPS and geographical information systems, closed circuit television roadway surveillance, and Enhanced 911.(22-26 January 2006)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, an ambulance provider increased its efficiency by 10 to 15 percent using AVL/CAD to improve route guidance.(January 1997)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Develop an effective evacuation plan for special event that gathers a large audience and consider co-locating the responding agencies in a joint command center.(01/30/2009)

When considering the use of camera phones in managing incidents, be aware of the challenges associated with technology interoperability among agencies and first responder priorities.(April 2007)

Prepare in advance for severe weather by staffing enough snow plow operators and ensuring that public information systems will be updated with current weather and road conditions.(March 27, 2007 )

Utilize transportation tools in communications, traffic control, and monitoring and prediction to maximize the ability of the highway network to support evacuation operations.(December 2006)

Include public and private sector transportation organizations as stakeholders in emergency evacuation operations and involve them in the preparedness and response planning.(December 2006)

Utilize ITS technologies to improve highway efficiency in emergency evacuations with advance notice.(December 2006)

Use a common Concept of Operations for evacuation operations that clarifies stakeholder roles and defines coordination activities for all operational phases of the evacuation.(December 2006)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Identify a single agency to be responsible for maintenance of an emergency vehicle preemption system.(January 2006)

Conduct rigorous testing prior to deployment of an emergency preemption system to avoid potential problems and negative system impacts.(January 2006)

Employ the use of critical ITS technologies in the emergency management of transportation operations during biohazard incidents.(2005)

Employ the use of critical ITS technologies in the emergency management of transportation operations during biohazard incidents.(2005)

Use the U.S. Department of Transportation's Biohazard Operational Concept as a blueprint to guide the development of a biohazard event management plan.(2005)

Manage response to a biohazard emergency using Emergency Activation Levels, an Incident Management System, and Emergency Operations Centers.(2005)

In preparation for managing transportation in catastrophic emergencies, identify agencies and their decision makers to interact with, and establish effective coordination with them to execute response.(May 2004)

Ensure redundancy of critical components in transportation support systems to be used in case of an emergency.(May 2004)

Ensure redundancy of critical components in transportation support systems to be used in case of an emergency.(May 2004)

Ensure reliable and interoperable communication between transportation and public safety agencies and use ITS to promptly disseminate travel updates to the public during emergencies.(May 2004)

Sustain ITS network operations and interagency communications during emergencies by ensuring provisions for alternate power supply and telecommunications services.(May 2004)

Develop and rehearse an emergency response plan for managing catastrophes with minimum panic, disruption and loss.(May 2004)

Involve both public and private sectors in disseminating emergency management and disaster recovery information (4/1/2004)

Anticipate and plan for delays in deployment related to weather and the physical environment.(12/1/2003)

Identify innovative solutions for deploying Information Stations that report real-time data for weather and traffic monitoring in the event of a hurricane.(11/1/2003)

Develop partnerships for a cost-effective approach to deploy remote traffic count stations that will provide real-time traffic data during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Identify all transportation, incident management, and emergency response entities and strive to resolve issues with semantics and terminology among different agencies.(March 2002)

Provide a single message to the public to assure consistency and to correct inaccurate crisis information.(March 2002)

Plan for system redundancies to ensure appropriate incident response activities and continuity of operations during emergency situations.(March 2002)

Utilize well-equipped safety service patrols to assist highway motorists after vehicle malfunctions or crashes, and to coordinate a safe and efficient response.(1/1/1999)