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Freeway Management > Information Dissemination > Highway Advisory Radio


Organizations operating ITS can share information collected by detectors associated with freeway management systems with road users through technologies within the freeway network, such as dynamic messages signs or highway advisory radio. ITS operators may also send information to in-vehicle devices capable of displaying traveler information. Coordination with regional or multimodal traveler information efforts, as well as arterial and incident management programs, can increase the availability of information on freeway travel conditions.


System costs for roadside traveler information systems were projected for upstate California; installation of changeable message signs (CMS) and mounting structures were estimated at $140K to $300K per site.(06/14/2019)

Average cost to install a highway advisory radio station ranged from $40,000 to $50,000 as reported by agencies that continue to use this technology.(2017)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

In Washington state, the Mount St. Helens traveler information system was installed at a cost of $499,526.(June 2009)

In Wenatchee, Washington, the construction of a Transportation Management Center (TMC) and the installation of the associated ITS field equipment cost $460,000.(June 2009)

In Yakima, Washington, the deployment of a Traveler Information System cost $333,000.(June 2009)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

In Lake County, Illinois, TMC physical components cost $1.8 million.(September 2003)

Life cycle cost of four options for a communications network connecting ITS field devices to the Illinois DOT District 8 Traffic Operations Center range from $43 million to $52.5 million.(May 2003)

The highway advisory radio (HAR) system deployed at Blewett/Stevens pass in Washington State included a portable HAR unit ($30,000), and two fixed HAR stations ($15,000 each).(July 2001)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) - Capital cost/unit - $40000 - O&M cost/unit - $5000(06/14/2019)

Highway Advisory Radio Transmitter - Capital cost/unit - $85000(April 1, 2013)

Highway Advisory Radio Beacon - Capital cost/unit - $25000(April 1, 2013)

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

HAR Transmitter - Capital cost/unit - $31000(01/01/2012)

HAR Flashing Signs - Capital cost/unit - $31000(01/01/2012)

HAR Transmitter - Capital cost/unit - $31000(01/01/2012)

HAR Flashing Signs - Capital cost/unit - $31000(01/01/2012)

Highway advisory radio transmitters - Capital cost/unit - $50000(November 19, 2010)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2007)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

Highway Advisory Radio - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $57500 - O&M cost/unit - $1200 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/29/2007)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign - Capital cost/unit - $6000 - O&M cost/unit - $1250 - Lifetime - 7 years(6/29/2007)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $24000 - Lifetime - 20 years(3/18/2006)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $46000 - O&M cost/unit - $2449(5 August 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $46000 - O&M cost/unit - $2449(5 August 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign and Beacon - Capital cost/unit - $46000 - O&M cost/unit - $2449(5 August 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign and Beacon - Capital cost/unit - $46000 - O&M cost/unit - $2449(5 August 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $46000 - O&M cost/unit - $2449(5 August 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) - Capital cost/unit - $40000(September 2003)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) Signs - Capital cost/unit - $40000(September 2003)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign - Capital cost/unit - $1000(06/30/2003)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $78000 - O&M cost/unit - $3000 - Lifetime - 10 years(06/30/2003)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $82000 - O&M cost/unit - $3280 - Lifetime - 10 years(8/31/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $51606 - O&M cost/unit - $5000 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/29/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $25000 - O&M cost/unit - $150 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/12/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000 - O&M cost/unit - $250 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/12/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $26000 - O&M cost/unit - $700 - Lifetime - 20 years(5/29/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $30000 - O&M cost/unit - $700 - Lifetime - 20 years(5/29/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) can provide route diversion information during periods of congestion when phone and internet travel advisory systems are not available; benefit-to-cost ratios can range from 4:1 to 16:1 assuming a 5 to 20 percent compliance rate.(2017)

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

During the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, a survey about the CommuterLink Web site showed that 98 percent of visitors and 97 percent of residents who used the Web site said it worked well for them(April 2003)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Provide drivers with sufficient managed lane information that can be easily disseminated and understood. (2005)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Provide consistent and high-quality information to influence traveler behavior.(6/1/1998)