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Road Weather Management > Information Dissemination


Information dissemination technologies help road weather managers notify travelers of any adverse conditions.


New Mexico DOT spent approximately $200,000 to deploy dust control systems in two safety critical locations along I-10.(June 2012)

The cost to operate and maintain UDOTs TI Weather Program is about $140,000 per year.(June 2012)

Arizona DOT utilized $6.5 million in FASTLANE grant funds to deploy dust detection system along I-10 stretch prone to blowing dust.(11/07/2019)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

The Pennsylvania (PA) Turnpike Commission expanded its statewide advanced traveler information system (ATIS) to better inform motorists of traffic, weather, and emergency conditions along the PA Turnpike. The overall project cost was $8.2 million.(April 2006)

In Finland, the average implementation cost for a weather responsive roadside VSL system on a dual carriageway was estimated at 80,000€; average maintenance costs (including replacement costs) were estimated at 3,500 €/km/year. (25 March 2006)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

A variable speed limit system consisting of multiple ITS components and covering 40 miles over the Snoqualmie Pass in Washington was designed and implemented for $5 million.(November 2001)

Weather Information Integration into Transportation Management Center estimated at $314,500, with $49,500 in annual maintenance costs. (January 2011)

In Wenatchee, Washington, the construction of a Transportation Management Center (TMC) and the installation of the associated ITS field equipment cost $460,000.(June 2009)

The Pennsylvania (PA) Turnpike Commission expanded its statewide advanced traveler information system (ATIS) to better inform motorists of traffic, weather, and emergency conditions along the PA Turnpike. The overall project cost was $8.2 million.(April 2006)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

The highway advisory radio (HAR) system deployed at Blewett/Stevens pass in Washington State included a portable HAR unit ($30,000), and two fixed HAR stations ($15,000 each).(July 2001)

Alaska's NewGen 511 Traveler Information System cost $440k to develop and $140k annually to operate.(April 2010)

From the 511 Deployment Coalition case study: total costs (to design, implement, and operate for one year) averaged $2.5 million among six statewide systems and $1.8 million among three metropolitan systems.(November 2006)

The Pennsylvania (PA) Turnpike Commission expanded its statewide advanced traveler information system (ATIS) to better inform motorists of traffic, weather, and emergency conditions along the PA Turnpike. The overall project cost was $8.2 million.(April 2006)

The cost to enhance the Arizona regional, multi-modal 511 traveler information system was just under $1.5 million.(30 September 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

Annual operating costs for the Greater Yellowstone Regional Traveler and Weather Information Systems (GYRTWIS) 511 system in Montana were about $196,000 per year for 2004 and 2005.(July 2004 and July 2006)

Sample costs collected by the 511 Deployment Coalition represent what deployers may encounter when planning or implementing a 511 system.(May 2004)

The cost to implement the pre-enhanced Arizona Department of Transportation 511 system was estimated at $355,000; operating costs for 2002 were estimated at $137,000.(17 February 2004)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

First year funding for the Nebraska 511 traveler information system was $120,000; estimated annual operations and maintenance costs are $110,000.(December 2001/January 2002)

MDOT spent approximately $100,000 to create an emergency truck parking portal to turn 6 Park and Ride lots into a safe haven to “ride out” winter storms instead of parking on highway ramps, shoulders, and in other unsafe locations(June 2012)

In Yakima, Washington, the deployment of a Traveler Information System cost $333,000.(June 2009)

In Washington State, a traveler information system was installed between the Washington-Oregon border at a cost of $358,000.(June 2009)

Cost estimates for rural ITS in Arizona (ITS maintenance, weather information systems, highway advisory radio, motorist assistance patrols, and training applications) totaled $3.78 million per year for five years.(September 2007)

Maryland State Highway Administration estimated fog warning system addition to existing environmental sensor stations near Big Savage Mountain, Maryland cost $75,000.(7 November 2003)

Road Weather Information System (RWIS) Environmental Sensor Station (ESS) - Capital cost/unit - $1080293(2013)

Truck Curve Warning and High Wind Warning System for Bridge - Capital cost/unit - $572000 - Lifetime - 20 years(3/18/2006)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $75000 - O&M cost/unit - $3000 - Lifetime - 7 years(8/28/2002)

Variable Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $16500 - Lifetime - 20 years(8/28/2002)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $50000 - O&M cost/unit - $1000 - Lifetime - 10 years(7/31/2001)

Variable Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $48000 - Lifetime - 10 years(7/31/2001)

Variable Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $65945 - O&M cost/unit - $2000 - Lifetime - 20 years(6/29/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $26000(8 January 2004)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $57500 - O&M cost/unit - $1200 - Lifetime - 10 years(8/28/2002)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4000 - O&M cost/unit - $250 - Lifetime - 7 years(8/28/2002)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $51606 - O&M cost/unit - $5000 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/29/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $25000 - O&M cost/unit - $150 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/12/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000 - O&M cost/unit - $250 - Lifetime - 10 years(6/12/2001)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $30000 - O&M cost/unit - $700 - Lifetime - 20 years(5/29/2001)

Roadside Probe Beacon - Capital cost/unit - $6000 - O&M cost/unit - $600 - Lifetime - 5 years(5/29/2001)

Drivers are more accepting of on-road dynamic messages/warnings than in-vehicle message/warnings.(09/18/2019)

Weather Notification System issues on time alerts 88.9 percent of time, but message coverage remains incomplete.(August 2010)

UDOT winter maintenance program saved $2.2 million per year in labor and material costs for winter maintenance, yielding a benefit-cost ratio of 10:1 by implementing agency coordination and integration policies.(06/30/2011)

In Finland, a benefit-cost analysis supported the deployment of weather information controlled variable speed limits on highly trafficked road segments.(25 March 2006)

In North Carolina, a wet pavement detection system on I-85 yielded a 39 percent reduction in the annual crash rate under wet conditions.(August 2004)

In Salt Lake City, Utah the ADVISE fog warning system tested on a two-mile section of I-215 promoted more uniform traffic flow, reducing vehicle speed variability by 22 percent while speeds increased 11 percent.(June 2003)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

In Tennessee, a fog detection and warning system implemented in 1994 significantly improved safety as no fog-related accidents have occurred since implementation.(October 2000)

An automated wet pavement warning system installed on a freeway ramp in Ft. Lauderdale reduced vehicle speeds by 10.2 mi/hr during heavy rain and by 4.6 mi/hr during periods of light rain. (6-10 August 2000)

In Finland, road weather information posted on dynamic message signs was well perceived and remembered by surveyed drivers; 90 percent deemed variable speed limit signs useful.(December 1995)

In Finland, a road weather information system with variable speed limit signs was projected to decrease the average vehicle speed by 0.4 to 1.4 percent and reduce the annual crash rate by 8 to 25 percent.(December 1995)

In Finland, a road weather information system with variable speed limit signs was projected to yield a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 0.6:1 to 1.6:1 depending on the influence of the system on vehicle speeds and crash rate.(December 1995)

In London, an automatic fog detection system that used freeway dynamic message signs to warn drivers of fog reduced traffic speeds by an average of 1.8 mi/h.(1993)

In a mountainous area of Spokane, Washington, 94 percent of travelers surveyed indicated that a road weather information website made them better prepared to travel; 56 percent agreed the information helped them avoid travel delays.(8 January 2004)

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

In Tennessee, a fog detection and warning system implemented in 1994 significantly improved safety as no fog-related accidents have occurred since implementation.(October 2000)

Drivers are more accepting of on-road dynamic messages/warnings than in-vehicle message/warnings.(09/18/2019)

Rapid deployment of DSRC for connected vehicles can save thousands of lives, regardless of whether a later transition to C-V2X proves advantageous.(12/12/2017)

UDOT’s Citizen Reporter app that utilizes crowdsourced road condition data produces annual savings of $250,000 in weather surveillance costs. (08/01/2019)

In Salt Lake City, Utah, staff meteorologists stationed at a TOC provided detailed weather forecast data to winter maintenance personnel, reducing costs for snow and ice control activities, and yielding a benefit-to-cost ratio of 10:1.(February 2007)

In Idaho, 80 percent of motorist surveyed who used Road-Weather Integrated Data System information as a traveler information resource indicated that the information they received made them better prepared for adverse weather.(2/2/2006)

In a mountainous area of Spokane, Washington, 94 percent of travelers surveyed indicated that a road weather information website made them better prepared to travel; 56 percent agreed the information helped them avoid travel delays.(8 January 2004)

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

Final Report of the FORETELL Consortium Operational Test: Weather Information for Surface Transportation(April 2003)

In Washington State, 80 percent of winter maintenance personnel that used the statewide road/weather information website said the National Weather Service warnings, satellite and radar images, and weather maps were useful.(March 2002)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

In Finland, a road weather information system was estimated to save an average of 23 minutes per de-icing activity and improve traffic conditions.(1993)

In Finland, a road weather information system was estimated to improve response times for road treatments, decrease the duration of slippery road conditions by 10 to 30 minutes, and eliminate 3 to 17 percent of crashes.(1993)

Use of a Weather Responsive Traveler Information System in Michigan results in statewide decrease of user delay costs (UDC) of between 25 and 67 percent during National Weather Service Advisories and Warnings.(01/01/2016)

Between 80 and 87 percent of users of the South Dakota Regional Traveler Information System for WRTM found the information valuable.(11/01/2015)

A Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) in Denver Colorado helped reduce maintenance operations labor hours, and had a benefit / cost ratio of 1.34.(December 7, 2009)

A Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) used by MaineDOT aided maintenance crews by providing visual aids to track storms, recommending treatments, extending trend forecasts, and creating training opportunities.(September, 2007)

Post warning messages on DMS that describe how drivers should react to hazardous conditions rather than just notifying them of the hazard ahead.(04/01/2016)

Ensure good data quality to successfully integrate weather alert system based upon Road Weather Information Systems.(August 2010)

Provide written procedures and training for issuing warnings to Regional Transportation Management Center operators for successful weather integration. (August 2010)

Use the self-evaluation and integration planning process to create wider awareness of the benefits of weather integration to improve TMC operations.(January 2011)

Prepare in advance for severe weather by staffing enough snow plow operators and ensuring that public information systems will be updated with current weather and road conditions.(March 27, 2007 )

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Minimize problems in creating contractual arrangements for testing a new ITS technology by creating negotiating benchmarks, designing a partnership arrangement, and developing a separate procurement process for different technological components. (3/1/1999)

Carefully select a project manager to be responsible for deployment and testing of new ITS technology.(3/1/1999)

Anticipate challenges with the ITS technology being tested, including problems with software modification and adaptation of previously developed technology.(3/1/1999)

Prepare in advance for severe weather by staffing enough snow plow operators and ensuring that public information systems will be updated with current weather and road conditions.(March 27, 2007 )

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Provide traveler information in rural areas to allow for good travel decisions in inclement weather and construction season.(November 2001)

Develop a good understanding of what is available from the SCMS and RSU/OBU vendors and develop a system of systems that supports end-to-end testing.(09/13/2016)

Prepare in advance for severe weather by staffing enough snow plow operators and ensuring that public information systems will be updated with current weather and road conditions.(March 27, 2007 )

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Investigate procurement alternatives of leasing, buying, or building equipment to minimize operations and maintenance costs.(12/30/2003)

Allocate adequate staff time for planning and management oversight to monitor progress and address issues.(12/30/2003)

Provide accurate and timely road condition and weather forecast information to rural travelers in cold weather regions.(12/30/2003)

Provide traveler information in rural areas to allow for good travel decisions in inclement weather and construction season.(November 2001)

Minimize problems in creating contractual arrangements for testing a new ITS technology by creating negotiating benchmarks, designing a partnership arrangement, and developing a separate procurement process for different technological components. (3/1/1999)

Carefully select a project manager to be responsible for deployment and testing of new ITS technology.(3/1/1999)

Anticipate challenges with the ITS technology being tested, including problems with software modification and adaptation of previously developed technology.(3/1/1999)

During system testing, CV Pilot sites discover the importance of having expertise in detecting and mitigating interferences with radio frequency and GPS signals(12/13/2018)

Refine institutional arrangements when deploying connected vehicle technology to outline the expectations of partners in terms of service, outcomes and reporting.(12/13/2018)

Refine proper antenna placement on connected vehicles (particularly commercial vehicles) to reduce DSRC ‘shadow’ areas where DSRC signal is degraded.(12/13/2018)

Connected vehicle deployers are encouraged to utilize multi-vendor outsourcing and to source suppliers early to create a collaborative environment that enables as much parallel work as possible.(12/13/2018)

Connected vehicle deployers should assess field equipment and organizational capabilities that will be needed to support core CV components.(12/13/2018)

Use current SAE, IEEE, and NTCIP standards with systems engineering content to control architecture and design activities for a connected vehicle network.(09/13/2017)

Use a Weather Responsive Traveler Information system to improve the real-time traffic management capabilities of operations staff during winter weather events by displaying more weather-related messages with a slightly faster advanced notification time.(01/01/2016)

Focus on the integration of business processes at the institutional or programmatic level rather than at the operations level.(2011)

Recognize staffing and communication needs for Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) projects.(April 2006)

Recognize integration issues in Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) Projects, and follow the systems engineering approach to establish a project's foundation.(April 2006)

Assess needs and communication infrastructure capabilities for the design of an Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS).(April 2006)

Integrate various types of road weather information to promote utilization by the public.(2/2/2006)

Improve management and operational procedures during a natural disaster by extending and supporting communication systems and networks. (8/1/2003)