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Road Weather Management > Traffic Control


Traffic control technologies improve traveler safety under poor weather conditions. A variety of technologies allow these control measures to be taken quickly in response to developing adverse weather.


Portable DMS Rental - Capital cost/unit - $295(11/30/2017)

Portable DMS Rental - Capital cost/unit - $295(11/30/2017)

Portable DMS Rental - Capital cost/unit - $295(11/30/2017)

Contingency - Big Savage - Capital cost/unit - $7000(7 November 2003)

Furnish and install radio transmitter, cabinet, and omni-directional antenna - Big Savage - Capital cost/unit - $5000(7 November 2003)

ESS warning sign - Capital cost/unit - $13000(7 November 2003)

Furnish and install solar panel power system (repeater site and two warning signs) - Big Savage - Capital cost/unit - $7500(7 November 2003)

Environmental Sensing Station (Weather Station) Fog Upgrade - Capital cost/unit - $2500(7 November 2003)

RWIS Software - Capital cost/unit - $5000(7 November 2003)

ESS Contingency - Capital cost/unit - $14000(7 November 2003)

ESS solar panel power system - Capital cost/unit - $7000(7 November 2003)

ESS Electrical power and telephone connect - Capital cost/unit - $5000(7 November 2003)

Contingency - Keysers Ridge - Capital cost/unit - $6000(7 November 2003)

ESS (RWIS station) that provides contact closure under low visibility (fog) conditions - Capital cost/unit - $60000(7 November 2003)

An analysis of the I-90 ramp closure system in Minnesota found benefit-cost ratios ranging from 0.13:1 to 3:1 with varying estimates of crash and delay reductions.(October 1999)

During a 1998 snow storm, Mn/DOT reduced roadway clearance costs by 18 percent on I-90 by activating a freeway gate closure system to limit vehicle interference and reduce snow compaction problems that increase work for plows.(October 1999)

A weather responsive signal control system installed on a busy corridor in Utah improved travel times by 3 percent and reduced overall stopped times by 14.5 percent during severe winter weather events.(10/13/2013)

A potential average reduction in rear-end conflicts of approximately 22 percent for moderate volume levels and 43 percent for high volume levels are projected to be most eliminated by a weather-responsive traffic signal system.(11/15/2011)

In Tennessee, a fog detection and warning system implemented in 1994 significantly improved safety as no fog-related accidents have occurred since implementation.(October 2000)

Weather-related traffic signal timing along a Minneapolis/St. Paul corridor reduced vehicle delay nearly eight percent and vehicle stops by over five percent.(1999)

Icy Curve Warning Systems in California reduced the number of annual crashes by 18 percent, and the system was estimated to provide safety benefits of $1.7 million dollars per winter season.(June 2012)

Using a Speed Management System for winter maintenance resulted in zero (100 percent reduction) winter weather related accidents in one section of highway in Snowmass Canyon.(June 2012)

Variable Speed Limit System shows promise; crashes reduced to lowest level in a decade.(October 2010)

In Finland, a benefit-cost analysis supported the deployment of weather information controlled variable speed limits on highly trafficked road segments.(25 March 2006)

In Salt Lake City, Utah the ADVISE fog warning system tested on a two-mile section of I-215 promoted more uniform traffic flow, reducing vehicle speed variability by 22 percent while speeds increased 11 percent.(June 2003)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

In Tennessee, a fog detection and warning system implemented in 1994 significantly improved safety as no fog-related accidents have occurred since implementation.(October 2000)

In Finland, road weather information posted on dynamic message signs was well perceived and remembered by surveyed drivers; 90 percent deemed variable speed limit signs useful.(December 1995)

In Finland, a road weather information system with variable speed limit signs was projected to decrease the average vehicle speed by 0.4 to 1.4 percent and reduce the annual crash rate by 8 to 25 percent.(December 1995)

In Finland, a road weather information system with variable speed limit signs was projected to yield a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 0.6:1 to 1.6:1 depending on the influence of the system on vehicle speeds and crash rate.(December 1995)

On the A16 Motorway in the Netherlands, an automatic fog warning system prompted drivers to slow down by 8 to 10 km/hr and drive at more uniform speeds; however, during extremely foggy conditions the system increased the average vehicle speed by 31 km/hr matching the recommended speed.(1995)

In Oregon, approximately 90 percent of motorists surveyed indicated that they would slow down in response to messages displayed by an automated high wind warning system.(February 2006)

In Oregon, the benefit-to-cost ratios for two automated wind warning systems were 4.13:1 and 22.80:1.(February 2006)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Ensure compatibility of data format of the field-weather monitoring sensors with the central software in the transportation management center.(01/30/2009)

Minimize problems in creating contractual arrangements for testing a new ITS technology by creating negotiating benchmarks, designing a partnership arrangement, and developing a separate procurement process for different technological components. (3/1/1999)

Carefully select a project manager to be responsible for deployment and testing of new ITS technology.(3/1/1999)

Anticipate challenges with the ITS technology being tested, including problems with software modification and adaptation of previously developed technology.(3/1/1999)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Integrate Road Weather Information Systems program and Transportation Management Centers to improve internal operations practices.(November 2009)