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Roadway Operations & Maintenance > Work Zone Management > Temporary Traffic Management


ITS applications in work zones include the temporary implementation of traffic management applications such as components of arterial and freeway management systems. These temporary systems can be stand-alone implementations, or they may supplement existing systems in the area during construction.


Smart Work Zone (SWZ) systems can detect congestion, display travel times, and recommend alternate routes. Benefit-to-cost ratios range from 10:1 to 12:1.(06/01/2019)

A work zone queue warning system at the I-70/I-57 interchange reduced queuing crashes by 14 percent and injury crashes by 11 percent.(01/01/2014)

A freeway work zone queue warning system was installed for approximately $1.545 million.(01/01/2014)

Expanding permanent DMS operations to include information on I-70 work zones has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 6.9:1.(December 2013)

In North Carolina, Portable Traffic-Monitoring Devices found to provide a cost-effective and safe means of recording speed and traffic counts in work zones.(June 11, 2010)

In Little Rock Arkansas, 82 percent of the drivers surveyed agreed that the Automated Work Zone Information System improved their ability to react to slow or stopped traffic.(October 2008)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) greatly reduced traffic demand through a highway work zone in California resulting reducing maximum average peak delay 50 percent more than expected.(22-26 January 2006)

In North Carolina, work zone construction staff observed a dramatic reduction in queue frequency and length when using a smart work zone traveler information system.(May 2005)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) deployed near Los Angeles, California, reduced freeway delay by 46 percent.(9-13 January 2005)

Modeling data indicated that an automated work zone information system deployed on I-5 near Los Angeles contributed to a 4.3 percent increase in diversions and an 81 percent increase in average network speed.(9-13 January 2005)

In North Carolina, a survey of motorists who experienced a smart work zone information system on I-95 found that 85 percent of respondents changed routes at least once in response to the delay and alternate route information posted.(9-13 January 2005)

An automated work zone information system deployed near Los Angeles effectively diverted traffic to alternate routes during periods of congestion.(2005)

In Los Angeles, a survey of motorists who experienced an automated work zone information system found that 78 percent of respondents changed their route based on the information provided.(2005)

The Illinois DOT enhanced work zone safety on I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system that posted traffic information and enforcement updates (number of citations issued) on dynamic message signs located upstream of the work zone.(October 2004)

License plate recognition system successful in monitoring travel times, leading to reduced congestion in work zone.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT staff reported a high level of satisfaction with the automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of Interstate 55.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT reduced operating costs during the reconstruction of I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system and eliminating the need for constant traffic monitoring.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT indicated that an automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of I-55 improved mobility by preventing severe congestion in the work zone. (October 2004)

In North Carolina, a survey of local residents near the Smart Work Zone systems found that over 95 percent of motorists surveyed would support use of these systems in the future.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, Smart Work Zone systems increased alternate route usage by 10 to 15 percent when specific delay and alternate route information was posted on roadside dynamic message signs.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, a modeling study indicated that work zone delay messages reduced maximum traffic backups by 56 percent and contributed to 55 percent reduction in traveler delay.(11-15 January 2004.)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, travel times and alternative route information posted on dynamic message signs prompted 12 to 14 percent of drivers to divert onto less congested alternative routes.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

Ninety-seven (97) percent of the motoring public found that predicted travel time information was useful when posted at a work zone on I-75 near Dayton, Ohio. (January 2002)

A work zone management system with real-time traffic information on I-496 in Lansing, Michigan had a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2:1.(14 March 2001)

In Nebraska, a portable speed detection and warning system placed upstream from an I-80 work zone decreased the highest 15 percent of vehicle speeds by about 5 mi/hr as vehicles approached the work zone lane merge area.(May 2000)

In Greenwood, Nebraska a portable traffic management system designed to caution drivers of work zone activity and encourage use of alternative routes during periods of congestion increased traffic diversion by 4 percent.(May 2000)

In Greenwood, Nebraska a survey of travelers indicated that 29 percent of drivers who remembered DMS messages at a work zone on I-80 thought the alternate route information provided was not useful; 23 percent thought the caution messages were not useful.(May 2000)

Speed-activated dynamic message signs with warning messages reduced vehicle speeds by 8 to 9 mi/hr; sustained effects for long-term work zones.(December 1998)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a motorist survey found 61% of drivers who experienced a portable traffic management system at a work zone felt more informed about traffic conditions than at other work zones.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, traffic speed data collected at two interstate work zones showed that when portable traffic management systems were deployed, work zone traffic volumes increased 4 to 7 percent during peak periods.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a portable traffic management system (PTMS) installed at two interstate work zones improved safety by slowing approaching vehicles by 9 mi/hr and reducing speed variability by 70 percent. (May 1997)

In Minnesota, a survey of travelers indicated that Smart Work Zone warning signs were accurate, useful, and gave travelers the information they needed.(January 1997)

In Philadelphia, the Traffic and Incident Management System (TIMS) on I-95 contributed to a 40 percent decrease in freeway incidents and reduced the incident-severity rate by 8 percent.(January 1997)

At a work zone in South Dakota, a speed monitoring and display system reduced the number of speeding passenger vehicles and trucks by as much as 25 and 40 percent respectively.(1995)

Speed activated dynamic message signs (DMS) with warning messages reduced speeding vehicles by 50 percent or more in Virginia work zones. (August 1994)

In San Diego, the cost to furnish, install, operate, and maintain an Automated Work Zone Information System (AWIS) for 750 working days was estimated at $53,000.(09/26/2016)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

Minnesota DOT deployed a dynamic late merge system for $900 per day per direction.(September 12, 2005)

Illinois DOT implements work zone ITS on the I-64 Add-lane Construction project at a cost of $435,000.(12 September 2005)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

Michigan DOT leased a dynamic lane merge system for I-94 reconstruction project at a cost of $120,000.(October 2004)

North Carolina DOT leased its first smart work zone system along I-95 near Fayetteville at a cost of $235,000.(3 June 2003)

In Arkansas, the contract bid costs for two different automated work zone information system ranged from $390 to $750 per day.(12-16 January 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Ohio DOT installed eight Web cameras, at a cost of $17,000, as a temporary solution to traffic surveillance in work zones.(July 2001)

The use of ITS for a temporary construction zone management in Michigan yields a positive benefit-to-cost ratio.(14 March 2001)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $12600(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $8643.5(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $3609.96(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $4900(10/29/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Smart Work Zone - Wireless Connection for license plate reader system - O&M cost/unit - $200(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Remobilization - Capital cost/unit - $10000(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Mobilization - Capital cost/unit - $75000(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - T1 Communication for license plate reader system - O&M cost/unit - $700(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Monthly Equipment Rental - Capital cost/unit - $15000(3 June 2003)

Verify that proposed innovations and technologies will operate as advertised.(01/01/2014)

Plan to recalibrate traffic sensors to accommodate lane shifts and other changes near work zones.(01/01/2014)

Plan adequate time to calibrate Bluetooth readers to maximize accuracy and reliability.(01/01/2014)

Ensure machine vision cameras are aligned to properly detect the onset of a queue.(01/01/2011)

Maintain ownership of the work zone ITS system and monitor vendor's work diligently to assure proper system operation.(October 2008)

Place portable changeable message signs (CMS) on the shoulder or median nearest the discontinuous lane when implementing a dynamic late merge system (DLMS) to manage a work zone.(10/1/2003)

Provide traveler information in rural areas to allow for good travel decisions in inclement weather and construction season.(November 2001)