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Traffic Incident Management > Information Dissemination > Dynamic Message Signs


Organizations operating ITS can share information concerning ongoing incidents with road users through technologies deployed as part of incident management programs, such as dynamic messages signs or highway advisory radio. ITS operators may also send information to in-vehicle devices capable of displaying traveler information. Coordination with regional or multimodal traveler information efforts, as well as arterial and freeway management programs, can also increase the availability of incident-related information.


Enhance traffic flow in a regional, multi-state corridor by using vehicle probes to monitor real-time traffic conditions. (August 12, 2010)

Use vehicle probes to monitor traffic cost-effectively, manage incidents and queue ups proactively, reduce delays, and increase traveler satisfaction along a multi-state transportation corridor.(August 12, 2010)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Limit CMS message length to allow for adequate reading time at high speeds.(5/27/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Adopt adequate and thorough procurement processes which cover purchases of both standardized commodity type equipment and highly complex integrated ITS components.(9/23/2003)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Define your agency's expectations of a new system and a robust set of system requirements and then choose the software that meets your requirements.(4/1/2003)

Deploy ITS systems strategically to achieve benefits.(6/1/2001)

Integrate freeway and alternate route operations to achieve greater benefits.(6/1/2001)

Use ITS Standards to achieve interchangeability and interoperability for Dynamic Message Signs.(Spring 2001)

Consider reconfiguring and integrating existing roadway management IT systems whenever possible to save costs associated with implementing new systems.(10/1/2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Utilize well-equipped safety service patrols to assist highway motorists after vehicle malfunctions or crashes, and to coordinate a safe and efficient response.(1/1/1999)

Provide consistent and high-quality information to influence traveler behavior.(6/1/1998)

Overall benefit-cost ratio for traffic incident management-oriented ITS program estimated to be 3.16.(July 31, 2015)

Highway segments with dynamic message signs found to have 16.6 percent fewer crashes than those segments without the signs.(July 31, 2015)

Delay savings benefit-to-cost ratio of 8.5:1 found with deployment of a traffic incident management system in Knoxville, Tennessee (05/01/2012)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

The annual operating cost to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies was estimated at $1.2 million.(June 2010)

A program designed to coordinate real-time incident and mobility information among regional transportation agencies has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 10:1.(June 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced the average incident duration from 67 minutes to 21 minutes, saving 7.25 million vehicle-hours of delay over one year. (August 2006)

In Georgia, the HERO motorist assistance patrol program and NaviGAtor incident management activities saved more than 187 million dollars yielding a benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.4:1.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the Navigator incident management program reduced secondary crashes from an expected 676 to 210 in the twelve months ending April 2004.(August 2006)

In Georgia, the NaviGAtor incident management program reduced annual fuel consumption by 6.83 million gallons, and contributed to decreased emissions: 2,457 tons less Carbon monoxide, 186 tons less hydrocarbons, and 262 tons less Nitrous oxides.(August 2006)

In Atlanta, satisfaction with motorist assistance patrols ranged from 93 to greater than 95 percent in two separate surveys of drivers who were already aware of the service.(August 2006)

Simulation revealed that a freeway management system in Fargo, North Dakota could reduce network travel times by 8 percent and increase speeds by 8 percent when DMS are used to warn drivers of incidents.(6-10 August 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Incident Management Simulation on a Freeway Corridor in Honolulu(8-12 November 1999)

In Japan, a real-time incident detection and warning system installed on a dangerous curve on the Hanshin Expressway decreased the rate of secondary crashes by 50 percent.(October 1997)

In Brooklyn, an incident management system on the Gowanus and Prospect Expressways used CCTV, highway advisory radio, dynamic message signs, and a construction information hotline to improve average incident clearance time by about one hour, a 66 percent improvement.(May 1997)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Driver confidence in traveler information improved after implementation of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system reduced fuel consumption by an estimated 2,600 gallons per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

In San Antonio, Texas, a freeway management system led to an estimated delay savings of 700 vehicle-hours per major incident.(12-16 January 1997)

Following deployment of the TransGuide freeway management system in San Antonio, Texas, crash frequency was reduced by 41 percent and incident response time decreased by 20 percent.(12-16 January 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

Costs to deploy an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) system in Minneapolis for ten years is estimated at $3.96 million.(November 2010)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

Florida DOT District IV 2006 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(January 2007)

The Pennsylvania (PA) Turnpike Commission expanded its statewide advanced traveler information system (ATIS) to better inform motorists of traffic, weather, and emergency conditions along the PA Turnpike. The overall project cost was $8.2 million.(April 2006)

Florida DOT District IV 2005 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(31 January 2006)

The cost of O&M at the Arizona TMC was estimated at $2 million per year.(January 2006)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

The $106 million capital cost for CommuterLink - the Salt Lake City, Utah advanced transportation management system - includes numerous components such as a signal system, ramp metering, traveler information dissemination, traffic surveillance and monitoring, and fiber optic network.(March 2004)

In Lake County, Illinois, TMC physical components cost $1.8 million.(September 2003)

The integrated freeway/incident management system covering 28.9 miles in San Antonio was deployed for approximately $26.6 million.(May 2000)

The costs of the Integrated Corridor Management Project (ICTM), deployed on an 8-mile section of the I-494 transportation corridor south of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, was $9 million.(April 2000)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

DMS Communications and Power Connection - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications wireless - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Smarter Highways gantry (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Smarter Highways gantry (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Variable Message Signs (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Variable Message Signs (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Conduit - Capital cost/unit - $150000(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $150000(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $150000(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $150000(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $150000(January 2008)

Variable Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18300 - O&M cost/unit - $600 - Lifetime - 7 years(06/30/2006)

Variable Message Sign (VMS) - Small - Capital cost/unit - $43347.462962963(May 2000)

Variable Message Sign (VMS) - Large - Capital cost/unit - $43347.462962963(May 2000)