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Traveler Information > En Route Information > Other Telephone


Regional and/or multimodal traveler information programs intended for travelers en-route to their destinations may make use of 511 telephone systems, in-vehicle devices, radios, or other wireless devices such as pagers and PDAs.


In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

Simulation results indicated that vehicle emissions could be reduced by two percent if arterial traffic flow data were included in the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington.(30 May 2000)

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.(30 May 2000)

A model determined that incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington could decrease the number of stops by 5.6 percent.(30 May 2000)

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.(30 May 2000)

An evaluation of traffic information used by travelers in the Detroit area, in 2000, found that most drivers perceived commercial radio as "more reliable" than television or dynamic message sign information. (May 2000)

Based on the survey results only 9 percent of households were aware of TravInfo, and less than 1 percent of the Bay area commuters who used traveler information used TravInfo.(25 April 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

More than 99 percent of surveyed users said they benefited from information provided by an advanced transportation management system and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. (June 1999)

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