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<a href="/ITS/benecost.nsf/SingleLink?ReadForm&Tax=Intelligent+Transportation+Systems+Commercial+Vehicle+Operations&Location=Lessons">Commercial Vehicle Operations</a>


ITS applications for commercial vehicle operations are designed to enhance communication between motor carriers and regulatory agencies. Examples include electronic registration and permitting programs, electronic exchange of inspection data between regulating agencies for better inspection targeting, electronic screening systems, and several applications to assist operators with fleet operations and security.


Design the system to withstand the demands of the physical environment in which it will be deployed.(4/1/2002)

Design and tailor system technology to deliver information of useful quality and quantity, that the user can reasonably absorb.(4/1/2002)

Experiences from truck parking information system pilot demonstrate that detectors must be properly oriented to the roadway and should be calibrated daily to maintain high detector accuracy.(May 2018)

A Smart City must address real-world challenges, not just deploy technology. (01/03/2017)

Prototype FRATIS designs should be flexible and able to accommodate changes within stakeholder organizations and user feedback.(May 22, 2015)

Drayage optimization algorithms may not apply equally in different operating scenarios, it is important to develop a deep understanding of the environment in which a solution will be deployed in advance of deploying an algorithm or prototype.(May 22, 2015)

Beware of accuracy and privacy issues in using truck transponder data for developing real-time traveler information applications.(August 2009)

Participate in truckers' meetings to advertise new freight advanced traveler information systems, communicate changes in existing systems, and obtain feedback from stakeholders.(January 2003)

College officials should consider food-delivery robots and other ways to support students' campus dining needs. (11/05/2019)

Consider requirements of fully implementing common carrier locker systems in public locations to allow room for expansion post-pilot.(10/01/2018)

Facilitate integration of CVISN by establishing cooperative relationship among stakeholders and promoting incentives to improve mobile communications and enhance enforcement.(28 February 2007)

Implement a commercial vehicle e-credentialing program in order to make administration and roadside inspections more efficient, keep vehicles moving on the state's roads, and expedite registration.(9/1/2004)

Use a bi-national stakeholder forum to help apply ITS technology at an international border crossing.(10/1/2003)

Monitor emerging security requirements and legislation that may impact commercial vehicle business processes.(10/1/2003)

Protect data privacy by implementing user authorization levels for sensitive information.(10/1/2003)

Use an interoperable transponder to assure maximum benefits to both the private and public sector.(10/1/2003)

When implementing a web responsive framework that leverages DSRC technology to expedite CMV weigh station bypass, ensure consistent communications between the driver’s mobile device application and the vehicle’s OBU.(09/01/2015)

Improve the effectiveness of commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers by integrating the function of roadside electronic screening systems with consolidated vehicle and driver safety compliance databases.(03/30/2015)

Facilitate integration of CVISN by establishing cooperative relationship among stakeholders and promoting incentives to improve mobile communications and enhance enforcement.(28 February 2007)

Ensure active oversight by knowledgeable state government staff of any complex ITS integration work that involves multiple contractors working simultaneously.(9/1/2004)

Assure success by involving all the relevant state agencies and the motor carrier industry early in the CVISN development process.(9/1/2004)

Maintain frequent and open communications with other states and the federal government when developing and deploying new, complex ITS technologies.(9/1/2004)

Work with the trucking industry to assure success in deploying an electronic credentialing system for commercial vehicles.(9/1/2004)

Use a bi-national stakeholder forum to help apply ITS technology at an international border crossing.(10/1/2003)

Monitor emerging security requirements and legislation that may impact commercial vehicle business processes.(10/1/2003)

Protect data privacy by implementing user authorization levels for sensitive information.(10/1/2003)

Use an interoperable transponder to assure maximum benefits to both the private and public sector.(10/1/2003)

Be sure to identify and take into account features unique to each state when designing and deploying ITS technology projects across multiple states.(3/29/2002)

When implementing a web responsive framework that leverages DSRC technology to expedite CMV weigh station bypass, ensure consistent communications between the driver’s mobile device application and the vehicle’s OBU.(09/01/2015)

Improve the effectiveness of commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers by integrating the function of roadside electronic screening systems with consolidated vehicle and driver safety compliance databases.(03/30/2015)

Recognize that the Smart InfraRed Inspection System has promise for increasing productivity of inspection personnel but not yet ready for national deployment due to lack of accuracy in flagging commercial vehicles with potential defects.(06/01/2011)

Facilitate integration of CVISN by establishing cooperative relationship among stakeholders and promoting incentives to improve mobile communications and enhance enforcement.(28 February 2007)

Ensure active oversight by knowledgeable state government staff of any complex ITS integration work that involves multiple contractors working simultaneously.(9/1/2004)

Assure success by involving all the relevant state agencies and the motor carrier industry early in the CVISN development process.(9/1/2004)

Be sure to identify and take into account features unique to each state when designing and deploying ITS technology projects across multiple states.(3/29/2002)

When implementing a web responsive framework that leverages DSRC technology to expedite CMV weigh station bypass, ensure consistent communications between the driver’s mobile device application and the vehicle’s OBU.(09/01/2015)

Improve the effectiveness of commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers by integrating the function of roadside electronic screening systems with consolidated vehicle and driver safety compliance databases.(03/30/2015)

Implement a commercial vehicle e-credentialing program in order to make administration and roadside inspections more efficient, keep vehicles moving on the state's roads, and expedite registration.(9/1/2004)

Ensure that new technology deployed in a weigh station to detect high-risk heavy trucks is in alignment with state organizational goals and inspection priorities.(31 January 2008)

Improve the effectiveness of commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers by integrating the function of roadside electronic screening systems with consolidated vehicle and driver safety compliance databases.(03/30/2015)

Improve the effectiveness of commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers by integrating the function of roadside electronic screening systems with consolidated vehicle and driver safety compliance databases.(03/30/2015)

Facilitate integration of CVISN by establishing cooperative relationship among stakeholders and promoting incentives to improve mobile communications and enhance enforcement.(28 February 2007)

Ensure active oversight by knowledgeable state government staff of any complex ITS integration work that involves multiple contractors working simultaneously.(9/1/2004)

Assure success by involving all the relevant state agencies and the motor carrier industry early in the CVISN development process.(9/1/2004)

Implement a commercial vehicle e-credentialing program in order to make administration and roadside inspections more efficient, keep vehicles moving on the state's roads, and expedite registration.(9/1/2004)

Be sure to identify and take into account features unique to each state when designing and deploying ITS technology projects across multiple states.(3/29/2002)

Ensure having a management-level champion to facilitate recruitment of participants and retain operational staff.(December 2002)

A Chinese study finds that e-commerce delivery services have potential to reduce traffic congestion by as much as 1.4 percent over baseline congestion.(01/08/2019)

Full deployment of mobility applications may be capable of eliminating more than 1/3rd of the travel delay that is caused by congestion.(12/10/12)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can have tremendous societal cost savings well beyond the break even point for benefits and costs.(11 November 2004)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can reduce the potential for terrorist consequences by approximately 36 percent.(11 November 2004)

Estimated benefits for shippers using an integrated shipment, equipment, and freight status information system equate to a 6.2 percent reduction in shipment costs.(September 2003)

In Scandinavia, vehicles equipped with a GPS-based tracking system and on-board monitoring systems were able to reduce wasted mileage and emissions in southern and central Sweden, and increase freight movement by 15 percent.(May/June 1997)

Fleet Increases Productivity by 15% using AVL System(April 1995)

In Europe, several projects investigated management systems designed to improve the operating efficiency of carriers. Centralized route planning systems reduced vehicle travel distances 18 percent and decreased travel time 14 percent.(1994-1998)

An ATA Foundation study (1992) found that trucking companies who use computer aided dispatch systems can make more runs per truck per day, and improve productivity by 5 to 25 percent.(1992)

Signal Priority operations shown to improve connected bus travel times by 8.2 percent and connected truck travel times by 39.7 percent.(08/19/2015)

Intelligent traffic signal systems can reduce average vehicle delay by 17 to 23 percent with 50 percent connected vehicle market penetration.(08/19/2015)

Telematics technology provides many benefits to trucking fleets.(08/26/2019)

Introduction of delivery fleet tracking system results in fuel savings of $4,815 across the five-truck fleet during a month long pilot program.(March/April 2012)

Tire pressure monitoring and maintenance systems improved motor carrier fuel economy by 1.4 to 1.8 percent.(02/24/2011)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can have tremendous societal cost savings well beyond the break even point for benefits and costs.(11 November 2004)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can reduce the potential for terrorist consequences by approximately 36 percent.(11 November 2004)

A series of interviews with commercial vehicle operators across the U.S. indicated that truck and motorcoach drivers are in strong agreement in favor of some ITS applications, but have mixed opinions about other applications. (1997)

ITS CVO applications for on-board safety monitoring were projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 0.02:1 to 0.49:1.(1996)

Several carriers reported that on-board monitoring systems enable carriers to increase loaded mileage by 9 to 16 percent, decrease operating costs, and save drivers time in reporting their status to dispatchers.(January 1992)

Telematics technology provides many benefits to trucking fleets.(08/26/2019)

Sixty-seven (67) percent of truck drivers reported that receiving real-time parking information via onboard computer applications significantly improved their ability to find parking.(January 2017)

The Colorado Truck Parking Information Management System (TPIMS) is projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 7:1.(04/14/2016)

Regional Truck Parking Information and Management Systems have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 4.27.(2015)

Final Report of the FORETELL Consortium Operational Test: Weather Information for Surface Transportation(April 2003)

FleetForward Evaluation, Final Report.(October 2000)

Drones have the potential to reduce greenhouse emissions on last-mile deliveries by 99 percent.(01/13/2020)

A self-driving delivery truck completed a cross-country trip in under three days.(12/11/2019)

Drone delivery can reduce delivery time of blood samples by 78 percent. (10/18/2019)

Use of common carrier lockers for urban freight delivery to Seattle Municipal Tower reduces total delivery time by 78 percent, with zero failed deliveries.(10/01/2018)

Truck platooning demonstration in Texas observes upper ranges of fuel-savings of 40 percent for the follower vehicle and 20 percent for the leader vehicle.(08/07/2018)

Study finds that 55.7 percent of all classifiable miles driven were platoonable, presenting the opportunity for significant fuel and emissions savings.(04/03/2018)

A field test suggests that self-driving trucks not subject to driver hours-of-service (HOS) limits can reduce coast-to-coast travel times by 60 percent.(02/06/2018)

Drone-augmented package delivery simulation shows cost savings upward of 28 percent per delivery.(January 2018)

A simulation effort shows that wide-area coordinated truck platooning can reduce fuel consumption by 7 percent.(11/13/2017)

Autonomous ground vehicles (AGVs) which are expected to dominate regular parcel delivery in urban areas by 2025, will produce an estimated 40 percent savings in delivery costs.(09/01/2016)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control in trucks could yield energy savings of 20-25 percent.(March 2015)

In Maryland, electronic screening and credentialing systems deployed as part of the CVISN program had an overall estimated benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.28 to 4.68.(November 1998)

Ninety-four percent (94 percent) of motor carrier companies surveyed say that electronic credentialing is more convenient, 80 percent saw savings in staff labor time, and 58 percent achieved costs savings over manual methods.(03/02/2009)

In 2000, a survey of Maryland motor carriers indicated that electronic data interchange and Internet technologies were valued more by carriers with large fleets (25 or more vehicles) that conduct business with state agencies.(14 November 2000)

A two-year study by the American Trucking Associations Foundation found that the commercial vehicle administrative processes reduced carriers' costs by an estimated 9 to 18 percent when electronic data interchange technology was used. (Fall 1996)

Ninety-four percent (94 percent) of motor carrier companies surveyed say that electronic credentialing is more convenient, 80 percent saw savings in staff labor time, and 58 percent achieved costs savings over manual methods.(03/02/2009)

Electronic credentialing allowed trucks to be placed into service an average of 3.5 days sooner than paper-based systems.(2 October 2007)

Approximately 50 percent of Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (CVISN) managers surveyed indicated that CVISN electronic credentialing systems can save staff time and labor, allowing additional support to be assigned to more critical agency functions. (28 February 2007)

In Kentucky and Virginia, state overhead costs required to maintain motor carrier accounts were estimated to decrease 35 percent for each motor carrier participating in electronic credentialing. (March 2002)

An evaluation of CVISN technologies found that electronic credentialing enabled carriers to commission new vehicles 60 percent faster, and saved 60 to 75 percent on credentialing costs by reducing paperwork.(March 2002)

In 2000, a survey of Maryland motor carriers indicated that electronic data interchange and Internet technologies were valued more by carriers with large fleets (25 or more vehicles) that conduct business with state agencies.(14 November 2000)

In the mid-continent transportation corridor, a study of electronic credentialing found that benefit-to-cost ratios for motor carriers and state agencies range from 0.7 to 2.7.(8-12 November 1999)

In Maryland, electronic screening and credentialing systems deployed as part of the CVISN program had an overall estimated benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.28 to 4.68.(November 1998)

Software supporting oversize/overweight permitting enables staff reduction from 21 to 9, statewide. (July 1998)

A series of interviews with commercial vehicle operators across the U.S. indicated that truck and motorcoach drivers are in strong agreement in favor of some ITS applications, but have mixed opinions about other applications. (1997)

A two-year study by the American Trucking Associations Foundation found that the commercial vehicle administrative processes reduced carriers' costs by an estimated 9 to 18 percent when electronic data interchange technology was used. (Fall 1996)

Motor carriers involved in the Automated Mileage and State Line Crossing Operational Test indicated that the automated reporting features tested have the potential to reduce International Fuel Tax Agreement and International Registration Plan reporting costs by 33 to 50 percent.(May 1996)

In 1994, the HELP/Crescent project evaluated the potential benefits of implementing automatic vehicle identification, weigh-in-motion, electronic screening, credentialing, automatic vehicle classification, and integrated communications and databases, and projected that these systems would yield a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 4.8:1 to 12:1 for state governments.(February 1994)

An evaluation of the Maryland Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks program indicated the program would have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.17 to 4.83 over a 10 year lifecycle.(November 1998)

ITS CVO applications for administrative processes were projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 1:1 to 19.8:1.(1996)

In a test using RFID tags for border crossing identification, full electronic verification and screening took place in one second compared to 15 minutes when done manually, and correctly identified vehicles' compliancy status 99 percent of the time.(October 2009)

Deploying CVISN at a border crossing led to a 32 percent improvement in inspection efficiency and also saved shippers $228,120 per year.(July 2008)

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection ACE e-Manifest System provides annual cost savings of over $2,000 to carriers and inspection staff in all but one scenario analyzed.(January 2008)

Final Evaluation Report: Ambassador Bridge Border Crossing System (ABBCS) Field Operational Test(May 2000)

In the mid-continent transportation corridor, a study of electronic border clearance technologies found that benefit-to-cost ratios for motor carriers range from 85:1 to 718:1(8-12 November 1999)

A simulation study of a transponder based system to improve border crossing processes for cars and trucks at the Peace Bridge between the U.S. and Canada found that, with 50 percent of the vehicles equipped with the technology, the average inspection time for cars and trucks would decrease by 14 to 66 percent.(April 1999)

A series of interviews with commercial vehicle operators across the U.S. indicated that truck and motorcoach drivers are in strong agreement in favor of some ITS applications, but have mixed opinions about other applications. (1997)

Automated enforcement systems that check motor carrier compliance with weight-distance tax regulations could recover up to $10.4 million annually from tax evaders in Kentucky.(01/13/2019)

Smart Roadside Inspection Stations can reduce emissions annually by 6.57 metric tonnes by not performing needless commercial vehicle inspections; compliant carriers saved $89,425 annually.(February 2013)

Adding an Automated License Plate Reader system to supplement an electronic credentialing system produces an estimated benefit cost ratio of 26.2:1.(21-25 September 2009)

Improvements in commercial vehicle travel times, fuel savings and emission reductions are five times greater when using an Automated License Plate Recognition system to determine inspection pull overs in conjunction with an electronic credentialling system.(21-25 September 2009)

Nearly all respondents (98 percent) to a nationwide motor carrier survey reported that CVISN electronic screening improved shipping times and reduced turnaround time delays.(03/02/2009)

CVISN technologies that improve carrier compliance can increase safety and carrier efficiency; benefit-to-cost ratios approach 7.5 for electronic screening and 2.6 for electronic credentialing.(03/02/2009)

Using Inspection Selection Systems (ISS) and out-of-service (OOS) history information provided by safety information exchange programs can lead to significant reductions in crashes injuries and fatalities due to heavy vehicles.(03/02/2009)

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can save motor carriers more than $600,000 per year in fuel costs and increase annual freight transport by more than two million miles.

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can reduce emissions of harmful particulate matter by 0.5 tons per year.

Pre-clearance systems that use interagency coordination to deploy interoperable electronic toll collection (ETC) and electronic screening (E-screening) systems improve the efficiency of motor carrier operations by saving time and money. Interoperable applications incorporated into a single transponder can save carriers between $0.63 to $2.15 per event at weigh stations. (12/2/2005)

In Colorado, an automated commercial vehicle pre-screening system installed at three ports of entry check stations saved 48,200 gallons of fuel per month.(12/29/2004)

In Colorado, an automated commercial vehicle pre-screening system installed at three ports of entry check stations saved approximately 8,000 vehicle hours of delay per month.(12/29/2004)

A simulation study of an Indiana weigh station found that implementing weigh-in-motion technology and equipping 40 to 50 percent of trucks with electronic screening transponders would significantly reduce queue overflows.(8-12 November 1999)

In the mid-continent transportation corridor, a study of electronic credentialing found that benefit-to-cost ratios for motor carriers and state agencies range from 0.7 to 2.7.(8-12 November 1999)

Evaluation of an automated commercial vehicle safety enforcement system in New South Wales, Australia found that the system had a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.5:1. (June 1998)

In 1994, the HELP/Crescent project evaluated the potential benefits of implementing automatic vehicle identification, weigh-in-motion, electronic screening, credentialing, automatic vehicle classification, and integrated communications and databases, and projected that these systems would yield a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 4.8:1 to 12:1 for state governments.(February 1994)

Smart Roadside Inspection Stations can reduce emissions annually by 6.57 metric tonnes by not performing needless commercial vehicle inspections; compliant carriers saved $89,425 annually.(February 2013)

Nearly all respondents (98 percent) to a nationwide motor carrier survey reported that CVISN electronic screening improved shipping times and reduced turnaround time delays.(03/02/2009)

CVISN technologies that improve carrier compliance can increase safety and carrier efficiency; benefit-to-cost ratios approach 7.5 for electronic screening and 2.6 for electronic credentialing.(03/02/2009)

Using Inspection Selection Systems (ISS) and out-of-service (OOS) history information provided by safety information exchange programs can lead to significant reductions in crashes injuries and fatalities due to heavy vehicles.(03/02/2009)

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can save motor carriers more than $600,000 per year in fuel costs and increase annual freight transport by more than two million miles.

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can reduce emissions of harmful particulate matter by 0.5 tons per year.

Most truck drivers who participated in an evaluation of CVISN technology felt that electronic screening saved them time but lacked a set of standards governing inspection selection; motor carriers were concerned with the cost-effectiveness of the technology.(March 2002)

An evaluation of CVISN technologies found that electronic screening techniques that promote compliance with commercial vehicle safety inspections could prevent thousands of truck accidents each year.(March 2002)

CVO inspectors participating in CVISN focus groups felt that CVISN technology saved time, and improved the speed and accuracy of data reporting. (March 2002)

In 2000, a survey of Maryland motor carriers asked them if electronic screening at mainline speeds would decrease unsafe and illegal carriers; approximately 32 percent agreed, 25 percent disagreed, and 42 percent were neutral; 24 percent were willing to participate despite the possibility of incurring more costs.(14 November 2000)

In the mid-continent transportation corridor, a study of electronic screening technologies found that benefit-to-cost ratios for motor carriers and state agencies range from 6.0:1 to 11.9:1.(8-12 November 1999)

An evaluation of the Maryland Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks program indicated the program would have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.17 to 4.83 over a 10 year lifecycle.(November 1998)

Advanced weigh stations with preclearance systems have benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 8.9:1 to 12.8:1.(03/30/2015)

Smart Roadside Inspection Stations can reduce emissions annually by 6.57 metric tonnes by not performing needless commercial vehicle inspections; compliant carriers saved $89,425 annually.(February 2013)

Adding an Automated License Plate Reader system to supplement an electronic credentialing system produces an estimated benefit cost ratio of 26.2:1.(21-25 September 2009)

Improvements in commercial vehicle travel times, fuel savings and emission reductions are five times greater when using an Automated License Plate Recognition system to determine inspection pull overs in conjunction with an electronic credentialling system.(21-25 September 2009)

Nearly all respondents (98 percent) to a nationwide motor carrier survey reported that CVISN electronic screening improved shipping times and reduced turnaround time delays.(03/02/2009)

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can save motor carriers more than $600,000 per year in fuel costs and increase annual freight transport by more than two million miles.

The Oregon DOT estimated that weigh-in-motion and electronic screening systems at 21 weigh stations can reduce emissions of harmful particulate matter by 0.5 tons per year.

In 2000, a survey of Maryland motor carriers asked them if electronic screening at mainline speeds would decrease unsafe and illegal carriers; approximately 32 percent agreed, 25 percent disagreed, and 42 percent were neutral; 24 percent were willing to participate despite the possibility of incurring more costs.(14 November 2000)

A simulation study of an Indiana weigh station found that implementing weigh-in-motion technology and equipping 40 to 50 percent of trucks with electronic screening transponders would significantly reduce queue overflows.(8-12 November 1999)

In the mid-continent transportation corridor, a study of electronic screening technologies found that benefit-to-cost ratios for motor carriers and state agencies range from 6.0:1 to 11.9:1.(8-12 November 1999)

A prototype CVO electronic screening and credentialing system deployed on two interstate corridors was projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 3.6 over 20 years as a result of improved safety and productivity for agencies and commercial carriers.(1996)

In 1994, the HELP/Crescent project evaluated the potential benefits of implementing automatic vehicle identification, weigh-in-motion, electronic screening, credentialing, automatic vehicle classification, and integrated communications and databases, and projected that these systems would yield a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 4.8:1 to 12:1 for state governments.(February 1994)

Institutional Issues Affecting the Implementation of IVHS Technologies to Commercial Vehicle Operations in the State of Indiana(1993)

Electronic screening produced operating cost savings per bypass of $8.68 for interstate motor carriers.(2 October 2007)

In Maryland, electronic screening and credentialing systems deployed as part of the CVISN program had an overall estimated benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.28 to 4.68.(November 1998)

ITS CVO applications for electronic screening were projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 1.9:1 to 6.5:1.(1996)

Smart Infrared Brake Inspection Systems identify trucks with faulty systems. Of the vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 86 percent were found to have a violation and 83 percent of those vehicles were placed out-of-service.(06/01/2011)

CVISN technologies that improve carrier compliance can increase safety and carrier efficiency; benefit-to-cost ratios approach 7.5 for electronic screening and 2.6 for electronic credentialing.(03/02/2009)

Using Inspection Selection Systems (ISS) and out-of-service (OOS) history information provided by safety information exchange programs can lead to significant reductions in crashes injuries and fatalities due to heavy vehicles.(03/02/2009)

An Integrated Safety and Security Enforcement System (ISSES) for identifying high-risk heavy trucks was estimated to contribute to crash reductions between 63 and 629, personal injuries between 16 and163, and 7 fatalities per year.(31 January 2008)

An infrared detection system deployed in a mobile van correctly identified vehicles that need to be taken off the road 44 percent of the time; an improvement over using random selection alone.(4/11/2006)

An evaluation of infrared brake screening systems at weigh stations indicated the technology increased the percentage of vehicles placed out of service because of brake problems by 250 percent.(December 2000)

A series of interviews with commercial vehicle operators across the U.S. indicated that truck and motorcoach drivers are in strong agreement in favor of some ITS applications, but have mixed opinions about other applications. (1997)

Smart Roadside Inspection Stations can reduce emissions annually by 6.57 metric tonnes by not performing needless commercial vehicle inspections; compliant carriers saved $89,425 annually.(February 2013)

For the industry data sample provided in this analysis, RSC technology is more effective than ESC technology at preventing rollover, jackknife, and tow/stuck crashes, thus providing greater benefit to society and carriers with markedly lower installation costs.(August 2012)

CVISN technologies that improve carrier compliance can increase safety and carrier efficiency; benefit-to-cost ratios approach 7.5 for electronic screening and 2.6 for electronic credentialing.(03/02/2009)

Using Inspection Selection Systems (ISS) and out-of-service (OOS) history information provided by safety information exchange programs can lead to significant reductions in crashes injuries and fatalities due to heavy vehicles.(03/02/2009)

Most truck drivers who participated in an evaluation of CVISN technology felt that electronic screening saved them time but lacked a set of standards governing inspection selection; motor carriers were concerned with the cost-effectiveness of the technology.(March 2002)

An evaluation of CVISN technologies found that electronic screening techniques that promote compliance with commercial vehicle safety inspections could prevent thousands of truck accidents each year.(March 2002)

CVO inspectors participating in CVISN focus groups felt that CVISN technology saved time, and improved the speed and accuracy of data reporting. (March 2002)

In 2000, a survey of Maryland motor carriers asked them if electronic screening at mainline speeds would decrease unsafe and illegal carriers; approximately 32 percent agreed, 25 percent disagreed, and 42 percent were neutral; 24 percent were willing to participate despite the possibility of incurring more costs.(14 November 2000)

An evaluation of the Maryland Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks program indicated the program would have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.17 to 4.83 over a 10 year lifecycle.(November 1998)

A prototype CVO electronic screening and credentialing system deployed on two interstate corridors was projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 3.6 over 20 years as a result of improved safety and productivity for agencies and commercial carriers.(1996)

Commercial trucks without speed limiters had a significantly higher crash rate (approximately 200 percent) compared to trucks equipped with speed limiters.(November 1, 2012)

In Maryland, electronic screening and credentialing systems deployed as part of the CVISN program had an overall estimated benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 3.28 to 4.68.(November 1998)

ITS CVO applications for automated roadside safety inspections were projected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio ranging from 1.3:1 to 1.4:1.(1996)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can have tremendous societal cost savings well beyond the break even point for benefits and costs.(11 November 2004)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can reduce the potential for terrorist consequences by approximately 36 percent.(11 November 2004)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can have tremendous societal cost savings well beyond the break even point for benefits and costs.(11 November 2004)

HAZMAT safety and security technologies can reduce the potential for terrorist consequences by approximately 36 percent.(11 November 2004)

Study finds that by 2035, a 50 percent penetration of electric drayage trucks for near-dock and off-dock service in the LA-area would reduce GHG emissions by 30 percent.(08/01/2015)

Commercially available, off-the-shelf technology that enhances the safety and security of hazmat transportation operations ranges in cost from $250 to $3,500 per vehicle.(31 August 2004)

Cost of remote asset tracking device begins at approximately $800 per trailer.(22 June 2000)

Commercially available, off-the-shelf technology that enhances the safety and security of hazmat transportation operations ranges in cost from $250 to $3,500 per vehicle.(31 August 2004)

A seaport technology program planned for the Port of Oakland was projected to cost $30.6 million.(01/29/2018)

The Colorado Truck Parking Information Management System (TPIMS) has a total estimated capital cost of $9 million.(04/14/2016)

The cost to deploy a real-time truck parking information system was estimated at $391,000 per rest area.(06/02/2015)

An intelligent truck parking management system using cameras to detect parking availability and automatically notify drivers via a website, in-cab messaging, and roadside dynamic message sign costs $70,000 to $120,000.(September 2014)

Implementation of electronic logging devices in commercial vehicles with onboard communications devices to cost $5 to $10 per vehicle.(11/25/2014)

Average per state start-up costs for electronic credentialing (EC) was estimated at $1.35 million; average annual O&M was estimated at $250,000 per state.(03/02/2009)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Total project cost for electronic credentialing system in New York state was $577,910.(September 2001)

Average per state start-up costs for electronic credentialing (EC) was estimated at $1.35 million; average annual O&M was estimated at $250,000 per state.(03/02/2009)

Startup costs were $275 and annual recurring costs were $125 for 38 companies enrolled in electronic credentialing.(2 October 2007)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Based on data from Maryland and Kentucky, the costs to deploy a CVISN electronic credentialing system ranges from $464,802 to $935,906.(March 2002)

Total project cost for electronic credentialing system in New York state was $577,910.(September 2001)

Cost of a province-wide, supplemental automated license plate reading system is $1,060,200 (CAN).(21-25 September 2009)

Start-up costs for electronic screening ranged from $1 million to $2.8 million per state; average O&M costs were about $160,000 per year.(03/02/2009)

Truck driver credentialing system at three Virginia terminals cost $7.5 million.(March 9, 2006)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Using data from Kentucky and Connecticut, the initial deployment of full CVISN electronic screening at a static scale site is $522,252. The cost of upgrading each additional site to full CVISN electronic screening is $303,540.(March 2002)

Start-up costs for electronic screening ranged from $1 million to $2.8 million per state; average O&M costs were about $160,000 per year.(03/02/2009)

An Integrated Safety and Security Enforcement System (ISSES) was installed on I-75 near London, Kentucky at a cost of $350,000. Subsequent installations in the State of Kentucky were $500,000.(31 January 2008)

Recurrent costs for electronic screening ranged from $7 to $14 per transponder per month.(2 October 2007)

A seaport technology program planned for the Port of Oakland was projected to cost $30.6 million.(01/29/2018)

The cost to deploy an advanced weigh station with a preclearance system was estimated at $3.3 million.(03/30/2015)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

Cost of a province-wide, supplemental automated license plate reading system is $1,060,200 (CAN).(21-25 September 2009)

Start-up costs for electronic screening ranged from $1 million to $2.8 million per state; average O&M costs were about $160,000 per year.(03/02/2009)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

ITS deployment set to improve safety, efficiency, air quality, and traveler information to cost $11,250,000 across Colorado.(12/29/2004)

Using data from Kentucky and Connecticut, the initial deployment of full CVISN electronic screening at a static scale site is $522,252. The cost of upgrading each additional site to full CVISN electronic screening is $303,540.(March 2002)

Weigh station electronic screening systems can be deployed with basic ($150,000) or advanced functions ($780,000).(8-12 November 1999)

An Integrated Safety and Security Enforcement System (ISSES) was installed on I-75 near London, Kentucky at a cost of $350,000. Subsequent installations in the State of Kentucky were $500,000.(31 January 2008)

"Thermal Eye" van and equipment for screening of commercial vehicles cost $500,000.(4/11/2006)

ITS deployment set to improve safety, efficiency, air quality, and traveler information to cost $11,250,000 across Colorado.(12/29/2004)

Average per state start-up costs for CVISN safety information exchange (SIE) was estimated at $680,000; average annual O&M was $74,000 per state.(03/02/2009)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

Using data from Kentucky and Connecticut, statewide deployment of the safety information exchange system cost approximately $650,000. (March 2002)

Commercially available, off-the-shelf technology that enhances the safety and security of hazmat transportation operations ranges in cost from $250 to $3,500 per vehicle.(31 August 2004)

Cost of remote asset tracking device begins at approximately $800 per trailer.(22 June 2000)

Commercially available, off-the-shelf technology that enhances the safety and security of hazmat transportation operations ranges in cost from $250 to $3,500 per vehicle.(31 August 2004)

Fleet Center Hardware - Capital cost/unit - $12000 - O&M cost/unit - $240(July 2005)

Fleet Center Hardware - Capital cost/unit - $9000 - O&M cost/unit - $180(July 2005)

Fiber Optic Cable - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information Systems Integration - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information System Operational Support - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Static Signage - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

CCTV Camera - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information System Software Maintenance/Licensing - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Fiber Optics Communications Network (Wide Area) - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Fiber Optic Network Equipment - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Vehicle Detector - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Utilities Connection - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Transponder Reader - Capital cost/unit - $9000(August 2009)

Commercial Vehicle Admin Labor - O&M cost/unit - $56295(7/17/2003)

CVO - Software Upgrade for Safety Administration - O&M cost/unit - $500000(5 August 2004)

CVO - CVA Software / Integration - O&M cost/unit - $1000000(5 August 2004)

CVO - Software Upgrade for Electronic Credentials Purchasing / Management - O&M cost/unit - $1000000(5 August 2004)

CVO - Software Upgrade for Interagency Information Exchange - O&M cost/unit - $1500000(5 August 2004)

CVO - Software Upgrade for Electronic Credentials Purchasing / Management - O&M cost/unit - $500000(5 August 2004)

CVO - Software Upgrade for Interagency Information Exchange - O&M cost/unit - $300000(5 August 2004)

Weigh station - Capital cost/unit - $4461633.33(2/4/2013)

Transponder - Capital cost/unit - $38(12/2/2005)

Weigh station - Capital cost/unit - $4461633.33(2/4/2013)

Electrical Conduit - Capital cost/unit - $10(05/26/2016)

Electrical Pull Box - Capital cost/unit - $10(05/26/2016)

Loop Detector Wire - Capital cost/unit - $10(05/26/2016)

Weigh-in-motion sensor - Capital cost/unit - $62425(2/4/2013)

Weigh station - Capital cost/unit - $62425(2/4/2013)

Weigh station - scale - Capital cost/unit - $62425(2/4/2013)

Weigh-in-motion system - Capital cost/unit - $62425(2/4/2013)

Weigh In Motion (WIM) - Capital cost/unit - $497000 - O&M cost/unit - $6240 - Lifetime - 10 years(2007)

Weigh-In-Motion Station - Capital cost/unit - $10

Piezoelectric sensor - Capital cost/unit - $10

Weigh In Motion System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(2013)

Weigh In Motion System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(2013)

WIM Roadway Devices - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Site - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Site - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Truck Weight Monitoring System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Site - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Roadway Devices - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Truck Weight Monitoring System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Fiber Optic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Fiber Optic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Truck Weight Monitoring System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Site - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Roadway Devices - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Site - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Roadway Devices - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Fiber Optic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Truck Weight Monitoring System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Fiber Optic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

WIM Roadway Devices - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Truck Weight Monitoring System - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Fiber Optic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $21420(01/01/2012)

Commercial Vehicle Check Station – Integration of PrePass with FDOT System - O&M cost/unit - $500000(5 August 2004)