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Freeway Management


There are six major ITS functions that make up freeway management systems: Traffic surveillance systems use detectors and video equipment to support the most advanced freeway management applications. Traffic control measures on freeway entrance ramps, such as ramp meters, can use sensor data to optimize freeway travel speeds and ramp meter wait times. Lane management applications can address the effective capacity of freeways and promote the use of high-occupancy commute modes. Special event transportation management systems can help control the impact of congestion at stadiums or convention centers. In areas with frequent events, large changeable destination signs or other lane control equipment can be installed. In areas with occasional or one-time events, portable equipment can help smooth traffic flow. Advanced communications have improved the dissemination of information to the traveling public. Motorists are now able to receive relevant information on location specific traffic conditions in a number of ways, including dynamic message signs, highway advisory radio, in-vehicle signing, or specialized information transmitted only to a specific set of vehicles.


Transit improvements, carpooling campaign, and HOV to HOT conversion demonstration project cost $70,460,779 for capital and $55,896,725 for ongoing maintenance.(03/21/2014)

Between 2003 and 2007, annual operating costs and revenues at 15 tolling agencies averaged $85.825 million and $265.753 million, respectively.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

The installation and operational costs for 599 speed cameras (mobile and fixed) deployed during a two-year pilot study in the United Kingdom totaled approximately £21 million.( 11 February 2003)

Study reports automated speed enforcement system costs 5.9 million euros in Denmark and 178,000 euros in Finland.(2000)

ADOT installs first-of-its-kind wrong-way driver thermal detection system in Phoenix for $3.7 million (8/8/2018)

System costs for roadside traveler information systems were projected for upstate California; installation of changeable message signs (CMS) and mounting structures were estimated at $140K to $300K per site.(06/14/2019)

Indiana initiated a $34 million ITS project to offer advanced incident messaging, traffic flow monitoring, and detection of wrong-way motorists at toll roads.

Statewide annual O&M for 410 CCTV cameras and 139 DMS units was estimated at $525,685 and $233,037, respectively.(10/23/2014)

A Bluetooth travel time detection system with seven detectors was integrated into a DMS roadside traveler information system for $90,000.(04/01/2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

Six replacement dynamic message signs with remote activation capability cost $321,000 to procure and install in Idaho.(February 7, 2013)

The cost to install six dynamic message signs on two freeways in North Carolina was estimated at $1,980,000.(12/17/2010)

Costs to deploy an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) system in Minneapolis for ten years is estimated at $3.96 million.(November 2010)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on I-10 and I-19 within the City of Tucson for approximately $3.1 million (2009).(02/01/2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on an 7.5-mile section of Loop 101 in the area of Scottsdale/Phoenix for approximately $1.6 million (2009).(01/27/2010)

In Washington state, the Mount St. Helens traveler information system was installed at a cost of $499,526.(June 2009)

In central Washington state, the cost of deploying two variable message signs (VMS) on westbound Interstate 90 was $660,000.(June 2009)

In central Washington state, the cost of deploying two variable message signs (VMS) on westbound Interstate 90 was $660,000.(June 2009)

In Washington State, the implementation of the SR 14 Traveler Information System cost $511,300(June 2009)

In Yakima, Washington, the deployment of a Traveler Information System cost $333,000.(June 2009)

In Washington State, a traveler information system was installed between the Washington-Oregon border at a cost of $358,000.(June 2009)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

Florida DOT District IV 2006 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(January 2007)

Florida DOT District IV 2005 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(31 January 2006)

The cost of O&M at the Arizona TMC was estimated at $2 million per year.(January 2006)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

The $106 million capital cost for CommuterLink - the Salt Lake City, Utah advanced transportation management system - includes numerous components such as a signal system, ramp metering, traveler information dissemination, traffic surveillance and monitoring, and fiber optic network.(March 2004)

In Lake County, Illinois, TMC physical components cost $1.8 million.(September 2003)

Life cycle cost of four options for a communications network connecting ITS field devices to the Illinois DOT District 8 Traffic Operations Center range from $43 million to $52.5 million.(May 2003)

The integrated freeway/incident management system covering 28.9 miles in San Antonio was deployed for approximately $26.6 million.(May 2000)

The costs of the Integrated Corridor Management Project (ICTM), deployed on an 8-mile section of the I-494 transportation corridor south of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, was $9 million.(April 2000)

System costs for roadside traveler information systems were projected for upstate California; installation of changeable message signs (CMS) and mounting structures were estimated at $140K to $300K per site.(06/14/2019)

Average cost to install a highway advisory radio station ranged from $40,000 to $50,000 as reported by agencies that continue to use this technology.(2017)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

In Washington state, the Mount St. Helens traveler information system was installed at a cost of $499,526.(June 2009)

In Wenatchee, Washington, the construction of a Transportation Management Center (TMC) and the installation of the associated ITS field equipment cost $460,000.(June 2009)

In Yakima, Washington, the deployment of a Traveler Information System cost $333,000.(June 2009)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

In Lake County, Illinois, TMC physical components cost $1.8 million.(September 2003)

Life cycle cost of four options for a communications network connecting ITS field devices to the Illinois DOT District 8 Traffic Operations Center range from $43 million to $52.5 million.(May 2003)

The highway advisory radio (HAR) system deployed at Blewett/Stevens pass in Washington State included a portable HAR unit ($30,000), and two fixed HAR stations ($15,000 each).(July 2001)

The average cost to upgrade backhaul telecommunications to support a DSRC roadside unit for V2I applications is estimated to vary from $3,000, if the site has sufficient backhaul and will only need an upgrade, to $40,000, if the site requires a completely new backhaul system.(09/01/2015)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

The proposed cost to program, configure, and integrate CMS devices and CCTV cameras into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $45,000 to $52,000.(04/04/2016)

The proposed cost to test the function of a CMS and CCTV camera system integrated into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $18,000 to $21,000.(04/04/2016)

Transit improvements, carpooling campaign, and HOV to HOT conversion demonstration project cost $70,460,779 for capital and $55,896,725 for ongoing maintenance.(03/21/2014)

Capital costs of HOV conversion to HOT lanes total $8,716,000 with annual operating costs beginning at $1,294,922.(02/01/2012)

Between 2003 and 2007, annual operating costs and revenues at 15 tolling agencies averaged $85.825 million and $265.753 million, respectively.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

The cost to convert two reversible high-occupancy vehicle lanes on an eight-mile stretch of the Interstate-15 in San Diego to high-occupancy toll lanes was $1.85 million. Evidence also suggests that costs to build new high-occupancy toll lanes are substantially higher, but financially feasible.(Spring 2000)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

Costs to deploy an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) system in Minneapolis for ten years is estimated at $3.96 million.(November 2010)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

Cost of constructing new managed lane facilities ranged from $6 million to $23 million per mile in the Minneapolis area.(November 2006)

Transit improvements, carpooling campaign, and HOV to HOT conversion demonstration project cost $70,460,779 for capital and $55,896,725 for ongoing maintenance.(03/21/2014)

Capital costs of HOV conversion to HOT lanes total $8,716,000 with annual operating costs beginning at $1,294,922.(02/01/2012)

Between 2003 and 2007, annual operating costs and revenues at 15 tolling agencies averaged $85.825 million and $265.753 million, respectively.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

Economies of scale reduced projections for MnPass managed lanes operations & maintenance costs to $50,000 per mile.(September 2010)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

Capital cost estimates to implement MnPASS dynamic pricing on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from $6 million to $23 million per mile.(September 2010)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

Cost estimates of operational concepts for converting HOV lanes to managed lanes on I-75/I-575 in Georgia range from $20.9 million to $23.7 million.(April 2006)

In San Diego County, the cost to implement ETC with managed lanes on a 26 mile section of I-5 was estimated at $1.7 million.(April 2006)

Value pricing is proposed to cost $32,625,000 over 3-years on a congested North Texas freeway(June 2005)

The cost to convert two reversible high-occupancy vehicle lanes on an eight-mile stretch of the Interstate-15 in San Diego to high-occupancy toll lanes was $1.85 million. Evidence also suggests that costs to build new high-occupancy toll lanes are substantially higher, but financially feasible.(Spring 2000)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

Minnesota's Smart Lanes using intelligent lane control signals (ILCS) and real-time transit and traffic DMS cost $22.6 million to install and $300K annually to operate.(January 4, 2013)

Initial deployment of 47 variable speed limit signs to cost $12.5 million (CAD)(December 3, 2015)

Capital costs to install temporary Variable Speed Limit (VSL) systems in Texas ranged from $91K to $180K.(06/01/2015)

A variable speed limit system consisting of multiple ITS components and covering 40 miles over the Snoqualmie Pass in Washington was designed and implemented for $5 million.(November 2001)

More than $224 million will be invested in Ohio’s 33 Smart Mobility Corridor by 2020.(03/15/2018)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on I-10 and I-19 within the City of Tucson for approximately $3.1 million (2009).(02/01/2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on an 7.5-mile section of Loop 101 in the area of Scottsdale/Phoenix for approximately $1.6 million (2009).(01/27/2010)

In Edmonds, Washington, connecting six arterial traffic signals and five CCTV cameras to a central signal system cost $90,000.(June 2009)

In Snohomish County, Washington, interconnecting five traffic signals and three CCTV cameras to a central signal system cost $91,000.(June 2009)

In Kent, Washington, the cost of connecting five arterial traffic signals and five CCTV cameras to a central signal system and another traffic management center was $92,000.(June 2009)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

The cost of O&M at the Arizona TMC was estimated at $2 million per year.(January 2006)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

The $106 million capital cost for CommuterLink - the Salt Lake City, Utah advanced transportation management system - includes numerous components such as a signal system, ramp metering, traveler information dissemination, traffic surveillance and monitoring, and fiber optic network.(March 2004)

The cost of a freeway ramp metering system in Denver, Colorado was estimated at $50,000 plus the cost of communications.(November 2001)

Minnesota DOT estimated ramp metering operations for FY 2000 were $210,000.(May 2001)

The costs of the Integrated Corridor Management Project (ICTM), deployed on an 8-mile section of the I-494 transportation corridor south of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, was $9 million.(April 2000)

Traditional and third-party data service cost comparisons show that estimated 10 year probe based costs average $7,650(06/27/2014)

System costs for TMC construction and integration of communication systems were projected for upstate California; capital costs were estimated at $1.2 million per facility.(06/14/2019)

A fiber optic communications network supporting traffic operations on a 17 mile section of US-24 in Colorado was estimated to cost $2.5 million.(2019)

The proposed cost to program, configure, and integrate CMS devices and CCTV cameras into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $45,000 to $52,000.(04/04/2016)

The proposed cost to test the function of a CMS and CCTV camera system integrated into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $18,000 to $21,000.(04/04/2016)

Statewide annual O&M for 410 CCTV cameras and 139 DMS units was estimated at $525,685 and $233,037, respectively.(10/23/2014)

Expanded traffic monitoring camera system cost estimated at $4.3M in Monroe County, PA.(April 1, 2013)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on I-10 and I-19 within the City of Tucson for approximately $3.1 million (2009).(02/01/2010)

The Arizona DOT installed a freeway management system to control and monitor traffic on an 7.5-mile section of Loop 101 in the area of Scottsdale/Phoenix for approximately $1.6 million (2009).(01/27/2010)

In Washington state, the Mount St. Helens traveler information system was installed at a cost of $499,526.(June 2009)

In Wenatchee, Washington, the construction of a Transportation Management Center (TMC) and the installation of the associated ITS field equipment cost $460,000.(June 2009)

In Washington State, a traveler information system was installed between the Washington-Oregon border at a cost of $358,000.(June 2009)

Total cost of Phoenix, Arizona-based testbed facility used to identify top vehicle detection technologies estimated to be $566,000.(October 2007)

Florida DOT District IV 2006 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(January 2007)

In Finland, the average implementation cost for a weather responsive roadside VSL system on a dual carriageway was estimated at 80,000€; average maintenance costs (including replacement costs) were estimated at 3,500 €/km/year. (25 March 2006)

Florida DOT District IV 2005 budget supports a variety of SMART SunGuide transportation management center programs.(31 January 2006)

The cost of O&M at the Arizona TMC was estimated at $2 million per year.(January 2006)

The $106 million capital cost for CommuterLink - the Salt Lake City, Utah advanced transportation management system - includes numerous components such as a signal system, ramp metering, traveler information dissemination, traffic surveillance and monitoring, and fiber optic network.(March 2004)

Based on data from Florida DOT, the initial costs of a CCTV video camera site ranges from $16,550 to $27,550. Pole height, site spacing, and other design and maintenance issues factor into the life cycle costs.(25 November 2003)

In Lake County, Illinois, TMC physical components cost $1.8 million.(September 2003)

Life cycle cost of four options for a communications network connecting ITS field devices to the Illinois DOT District 8 Traffic Operations Center range from $43 million to $52.5 million.(May 2003)

The costs of the Integrated Corridor Management Project (ICTM), deployed on an 8-mile section of the I-494 transportation corridor south of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, was $9 million.(April 2000)

The capital cost of the TRANSMIT traffic surveillance and incident detection system was estimated at $975,200.(November 1999)

System costs for traffic surveillance and road weather information systems were projected for upstate California.(06/14/2019)

CCTV Camera System(06/14/2019)

CCTV Camera System(06/14/2019)

Indiana initiated a $34 million ITS project to offer advanced incident messaging, traffic flow monitoring, and detection of wrong-way motorists at toll roads.

ADOT installs first-of-its-kind wrong-way driver thermal detection system in Phoenix for $3.7 million (8/8/2018)

In Nisqually Valley, Washington, an Ice Warning System consisting of a road weather information system (RWIS) station and closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera cost $165,000.(June 2009)

Speed Radar Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $750(05/30/2013)

Speed Radar Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $750(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $94088.5(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $93297(2013)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $40000 - O&M cost/unit - $5000(06/14/2019)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $40000 - O&M cost/unit - $5000(06/14/2019)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Sign - Capital cost/unit - $40000 - O&M cost/unit - $5000(06/14/2019)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Sign - Capital cost/unit - $40000 - O&M cost/unit - $5000(06/14/2019)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

DMS Communications and Power Connection - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $108500(07/01/2018)

Service Meter Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Electrical Conduit - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Fiber Optic Termination Panel - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Electrical Pull Box - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Service Meter Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Cellular Modem - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

Electrical Conduit - Capital cost/unit - $35(10/19/2017)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $120065(10/25/2016)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $135983.4(10/25/2016)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $125729(10/25/2016)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $118944.4(10/25/2016)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Installation Work - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Maintenance Parts - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) O&M - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) O&M Training - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Electrical Service - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Maintenance Parts - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Installation Work - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) O&M Training - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) O&M - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Electrical Service - Capital cost/unit - $2(05/06/2014)

Maintain DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Remove and Reinstall DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Maintain DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Remove and Reinstall DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Remove and Reinstall DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Remove and Reinstall DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Maintain DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Maintain DMS - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - O&M cost/unit - $750(10/29/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

DMS Electrical Work - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $175000(April 1, 2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $53500(February 7, 2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications wireless - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - shelter - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

DMS support structure - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Communications equipment - cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic message sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(2/4/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Wireless Communciations Link - Capital cost/unit - $564.39(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $16513.52(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

LED Traffic Sign - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $16513.52(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

DMS - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Electrical Power Service - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Assembly - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $92080(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Electrical Power Service - Capital cost/unit - $202943.95(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign Tower - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $115000(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $136159.18(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $83247(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $579.6(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $16513.52(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Wireless Communications Link - Capital cost/unit - $3130(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $84076(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $350000(01/01/2012)

DMS Communciations Uprade - Capital cost/unit - $4850(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

DMS Support Structure Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $9500(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $9500(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $115000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $115000(01/01/2012)

DMS Communciations Uprade - Capital cost/unit - $4850(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $115000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $350000(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $115000(01/01/2012)

DMS Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $9500(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

DMS Support Structure Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $9500(01/01/2012)

Install Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $28837(01/01/2012)

Smarter Highways gantry (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $650000(November 19, 2010)

Smarter Highways gantry (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $650000(November 19, 2010)

Variable Message Signs (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $650000(November 19, 2010)

Variable Message Signs (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $650000(November 19, 2010)

Changeable Message Sign (CMS) - Capital cost/unit - $145872 - Lifetime - 25 years(2007)

Changeable Message Sign (CMS) Tower - Capital cost/unit - $145872 - Lifetime - 25 years(2007)

Extinguishable Message Sign (EMS) - Capital cost/unit - $145872 - Lifetime - 25 years(2007)

Dynamic Message Sign and Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $162000(April 2010)

Dynamic Message Sign and Support Structure - Capital cost/unit - $223000(April 2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Spare Parts - Capital cost/unit - $74000(02/25/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $108400(2/12/2013)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Electrical Supply Load Center Cabinet - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $4000(02/01/2010)

Variable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000(02/01/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $700(01/27/2010)

Control Cabinet Foundation - Capital cost/unit - $783(01/27/2010)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2009)

FIBER TRANSCEIVER SIGN - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

FIBER TRANSCEIVER SIGN - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

FIBER TRANSCEIVER SIGN - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

FIBER TRANSCEIVER SIGN - Capital cost/unit - $98000(03/21/2008)

Conduit - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

Junction Box - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $98209.29(2008)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $18.25(January 2008)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC - Capital cost/unit - $15000(8/24/2007)

Fiber Optic Cable - Capital cost/unit - $15000(8/24/2007)

Fiber Optic Cable - Capital cost/unit - $15000(8/24/2007)

VARIABLE MESSAGE SIGN-DYNAMIC SIDE MOUNT - Capital cost/unit - $15000(8/24/2007)

CONDUIT-2 INCH - Capital cost/unit - $15000(8/24/2007)

Violations fell from 20 percent to 9 percent with implementation of transponder-based electronic tolling(November 2006)

Modeling effort shows Active Transportation Management systems can reduce average morning travel time by 21 percent on the I-270 corridor.(08/01/2018)

Increase in automatic speed enforcement camera coverage in Finland resulted in a benefit-cost ratia of 3.91 and over $15 million in annual safety benefits.(May/June 2010)

A speed enforcement camera demonstration program on Loop 101 Freeway in Scottsdale, Arizona reduced the average speed by about 9 mph, reduced the speed distribution, and reduced the number of speeding drivers by at least a 67.5 percent decrease in the proportion of the number of faster drivers.(November, 2007)

In Scottsdale, Arizona, a speed enforcement camera demonstration program on a freeway decreased the number of target crashes by 44 to 54 percent, injury crashes by 28 to 48 percent, and Proptery Damage Only crashes by 46 to 56 percent.(November, 2007)

Seventy (70) percent of survey respondents in Great Britain thought that automated speed and red-light enforcement cameras were a useful way to reduce accidents and save lives. ( 11 February 2003)

Automated speed and red-light enforcement reduced the percentage of vehicles exceeding the speed limit by 58 percent, the number of persons killed or seriously injured by 4 to 65 percent, and the personal injury accident rate by 6 percent.( 11 February 2003)

Evaluation studies showed that roadways equipped with automated speed enforcement can reduce the number of speeding vehicles by 27 to 78 percent.(13-17 January 2002)

In Texas, police who used remote camera/radar systems to enforce work zone speed limits noted improved safety to officers, but expressed some concern over effectiveness in identifying speeding vehicles.(13-17 January 2002)

Automated speed and red light enforcement lowered crash frequency by 14 percent, decreased crash injuries by 19 to 98 percent, and fatalities 7 to 83 percent.(2001)

Automated speed enforcement in England has increased capacity by 5 to 10 percent. (August 1999)

An automated speed enforcement system deployed in Korea reduced crash frequency by 28 percent and decreased crash fatalities by 60 percent. (12-16 October 1998)

A survey of travelers in the Washington, DC region indicated that 86 percent favored the use of video technology to enforce aggressive driving laws.(11 September 1998)

In England, a variable speed limit system on the M25 freeway increases average travel times, but promotes proper following distances between vehicles and creates smoother traffic flow.(14 March 1997)

Automated speed enforcement systems decreased injury accidents by 5 to 26 percent.(1997)

Increase of Traffic Safety by Surveillance of Speed Limits with Automatic Radar-Devices on a Dangerous Section of a German Autobahn: A Long-Term Investigation(1984)

An implementation of proactive variable speed limits (VSL) was simulated to reduce critical traffic conditions by 39 percent.(February 2018)

Expanding permanent DMS operations to include information on I-70 work zones has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 6.9:1.(December 2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

When link travel times posted on DMS are twice as long as typical travel times, drivers begin to favor alternate routes.(09/27/2012)

Decision Support System scenarios modeled on the ICM Corridor in Dallas Texas show travel time savings of 9 percent on arterials when vehicles divert from the freeway.(August 1, 2012)

Ninety-four percent of travelers took the action indicated by the DMSs in rural Missouri and drivers were very satisfied by the accuracy of the information provided.(December 2011)

Rural DMSs providing detour information for a full, 3 day bridge closure provided over $21,000 in benefits to motorists in Missouri.(December 2011)

Vehicle speeds decreased significantly in work zones where DMSs were used to inform drivers upstream.(December 2011)

In St. Louis County, Missouri, full closure of portions of I-64 for two years allowed for an accelerated construction schedule, saving taxpayers between $93 million and $187 million.(November 2011)

Benefit-to-cost ratios for six dynamic message signs on two freeways ranged from 1.38:1 to 16.95:1 based on total crashes; however, hazard warnings posted during incidents were ineffective at reducing secondary crashes.(12/17/2010)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

Changeable Message Signs in the Bay Area that displayed highway and transit trip times and departure times for the next train influenced 1.6 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was less than 15 minutes, and 7.9 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was greater than 20 minutes.(September 2009)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Houston, a survey of motorists found that 85 percent of respondents changed their route after viewing real-time travel time information on freeway dynamic message signs.(May 2005)

Deployment experiences document the importance of traveler information and list top sources of traveler information.(2005)

In Southeast Pennsylvania, survey results indicated that users of the SmarTraveler website were more likely to use the service again compared to users of the SmarTraveler telephone service.(19-22 May 2003)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, travel times and alternative route information posted on dynamic message signs prompted 12 to 14 percent of drivers to divert onto less congested alternative routes.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

During the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, a survey about the CommuterLink Web site showed that 98 percent of visitors and 97 percent of residents who used the Web site said it worked well for them(April 2003)

Evaluation of Variable Message Signs in Wisconsin: Driver Survey(May 2002)

Simulations indicated that using a decision support tool to select alternative traffic control plans during non-recurring congestion in the Disney Land area of Anaheim, California could reduce travel time by 2 to 29 percent and decrease stop time by 15 to 56 percent. (December 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

A model indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced crash fatalities by 3.2 percent during peak periods.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced delay by 0.2 minutes per trip during AM peak periods and by 0.6 minutes during PM peak periods. (4-7 June 2001)

Modeling found emissions reductions of 3.7 to 4.6 percent due to an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.(4-7 June 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

Simulation revealed that a freeway management system in Fargo, North Dakota could reduce network travel times by 8 percent and increase speeds by 8 percent when DMS are used to warn drivers of incidents.(6-10 August 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

An evaluation of traffic information used by travelers in the Detroit area, in 2000, found that most drivers perceived commercial radio as "more reliable" than television or dynamic message sign information. (May 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 40 percent changed route due to DMS recommendations.(January 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

In Japan, real-time alternative-route travel time information posted on dynamic message signs contributed to a 3.7 percent divergence rate during periods of congestion, saving detoured motorists an average of 9.8 minutes per vehicle.(12-16 October 1998)

Evaluation Report for ITS for Voluntary Emission Reduction: An ITS Operational Test for Real-Time Vehicle Emissions Detection(May 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) can provide route diversion information during periods of congestion when phone and internet travel advisory systems are not available; benefit-to-cost ratios can range from 4:1 to 16:1 assuming a 5 to 20 percent compliance rate.(2017)

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

During the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, a survey about the CommuterLink Web site showed that 98 percent of visitors and 97 percent of residents who used the Web site said it worked well for them(April 2003)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Simulated use of dynamic eco-driving speed guidance strategy in vehicles shows an emissions reduction of 25 percent.(12/21/2017)

Rapid deployment of DSRC for connected vehicles can save thousands of lives, regardless of whether a later transition to C-V2X proves advantageous.(12/12/2017)

Evaluation of an In-Vehicle Active Traffic and Demand Management System finds that 73 percent of participants favor the technology(04/04/2016)

Presence of pedestrian countdown signals in Michigan reduces crashes involving pedestrians age 65 years and older by 65 percent.(11/15/2015)

Intelligent speed control applications that smooth traffic flow during congested conditions can reduce fuel consumption by 10 to 20 percent without drastically affecting overall travel times.(2009)

ICM improves center-to-center communications, traveler information, and traffic management(October 2010)

Iowa DOT estimates that AV adoption could increase freeway lane capacity up to 26 percent on I-80.(January 2018)

Low Emissions Zones concept can potentially reduce emissions by 15-18 percent.(January 2015)

Speed harmonization reduced delay by 7.6 percent as an eco-lanes application.(January 2014)

Eco-lanes system with eco-cruise control reduced fuel consumption by 4.5 percent, in addition to reducing HC, CO, and CO2 emissions.(January 2014)

Speed harmonization reduced fuel consumption by 6.3 percent in addition to reducing HC, CO, NOx, and CO2 emissions.(January 2014)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

The cost to evaluate ICM using AMS tools was estimated at five percent of the deployment budget.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

In San Diego, ICM improves mobility for most commuters on I-15 saving them more than 1,400 person hours each day during peak commute periods.(12/01/2016)

Gross toll revenue of the I-10 ExpressLanes was $8,918,985 and I-110 ExpressLanes was $18,704,961 in the first 16 months of HOT lane operation.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes on I-10 and I-110 in Los Angeles was projected to provide transit riders a travel time benefit of $9,186,074 over a 10-year period.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

HOT lane conversion improved travel times during peak periods and influenced 49 percent of new I-85 Xpress bus riders to start using transit.(03/21/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Benefits from an initial HOT lanes deployment in Minneapolis St. Paul were maintained in the long term, while a system expansion resulted in fewer benefits, but at a much cheaper cost.(April 2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Simulation shows an optimized CAV control framework can increase the effective capacity of high-volume corridors.(3/18/19)

Simulation shows V2I applications that use real-time traffic data to recommend merge maneuvers can increase throughput 18 to 22 percent compared to existing systems that use message displays on overhead gantries.(01/13/2019)

Part-time shoulder simulated to decrease travel time by up to 1.86 minutes per kilometer along congested segments of Philadelphia interstate.(11/21/18)

An Active Traffic Management System (ATM) on I-66 in Northern Virginia reduced total (all severity), multiple-vehicle (all severity), and rear-end (all severity) crashes, 6 percent, 10 percent, and 11 percent, respectively.(10/01/2018)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

During an incident, motorists can see up to a 50 percent savings in travel time with MDOT’s Flex Route lane control system.(11/13/2017)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

The cost to evaluate ICM using AMS tools was estimated at five percent of the deployment budget.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

In San Diego, ICM improves mobility for most commuters on I-15 saving them more than 1,400 person hours each day during peak commute periods.(12/01/2016)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

Deployment of variable rate, all-electronic, open road tolling on SR-520 Bridge near Seattle yielded $55 million of revenue in 2012.(12/02/2014)

Data indicates that total saved value of travel time on variable tolling lanes can reach 11 percent of the total value of time spent travelling compared to uniform tolling rates.(03/02/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Conversion of an HOV lane to a HOT lane in Washington State allowed for a 3 to 19 percent increase in speeds in general purpose lanes despite a 2 to 3 percent increase in volumes in the general lanes.(November 19, 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Benefit-to-cost estimates for dynamic pricing applications on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from 1.1 to 8.2.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Traffic volumes doubled from 10,000 trips per week to 20,000 trips per week in HOT lanes without negative effects on speeds.(November 2006)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

Value pricing has been shown to increase revenue, reduce congestion by maximizing lane capacity and reduce travel time of highway transportation.(27 February 2003)

End-of-Queue Warning system installed along I-35 in Texas estimated to have reduced crashes by 44 percent, resulting in $1.36 million in reduced crash costs (over a one year period).(01/10/2016)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Simulation shows an optimized CAV control framework can increase the effective capacity of high-volume corridors.(3/18/19)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can improve throughput by 21 percent with 10 percent market penetration.(June 4-7, 2018)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can reduce fuel consumption by more than 16 percent.(June 4-7, 2018)

Track testing suggests stop-and-go freeway traffic flow can be controlled to increase throughput by 15 percent with as few as 5 percent autonomous vehicles in the traffic stream.(05/04/2017)

Track testing suggests stop-and-go freeway traffic can be controlled to reduce fuel consumption by 40 percent with as few as 5 percent autonomous vehicles in the traffic stream.(05/04/2017)

Simulation models show that an optimal control speed harmonization strategy can reduce per-vehicle travel time by 28 to 32 percent.(January 8, 2017)

Simulation models show that an optimal control speed harmonization strategy can reduce per-vehicle fuel consumption by 12 to 17 percent.(January 8, 2017)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Eco-Speed Harmonization and Eco-Connected Adaptive Cruise Control applications show results of up to a 22 percent reduction in energy and a 33 percent reduction in travel time.

Tractor-trailer platooning enabled by V2V communications demonstrates fuel savings up to 9.7 percent.(September 2014)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

Variable Speed Limits (VSL) cut crash rates by more than half during low visibility on I-77 in Virginia.(09/01/2018)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

An implementation of proactive variable speed limits (VSL) was simulated to reduce critical traffic conditions by 39 percent.(February 2018)

Ramp metering and dynamic speed limits shown to reduce congestion and shorten average travel times by about 2.5 minutes on a 7.8 km stretch of the A25 motorway in France.(September 4-6, 2017)

Dynamic Speed Limit Systems in Belgium found to have decreased the number of injury crashes by 18 percent.(July 4, 2017)

When combined, ramp metering and variable speed limits may reduce conflicts by 16.5 percent and crash odds by 6.0 percent in weaving segments.(January 2017)

Variable speed limit pilot found to be effective reducing the number of overall crashes. (08/09/2015)

Variable speed limit systems reduced the number and severity of crashes at three pilot sites in Texas. Benefit-to-Cost ratios ranged from 7:1 to 14:1.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Advisory Variable Speed Limit System in Portland, Oregon reduces speed variation and the number of crashes in the area.(May 18, 2015)

In Smart Zone work zones, 71 percent of local resident survey respondents found variable speed limit signs useful.(January 28, 2015)

Variable speed limits have safety benefits and a homogenizing effect, but a German study found no increase in freeway capacity.(January 13, 2013)

Variable Speed Limit model yields up to 42.4 percent reduction on number of vehicle stops and 17.6 percent reduction on the average travel time.(01/01/2013)

Implementing variable mandatory speed limits on four lanes with the optional use of the hard shoulder as a running lane resulted in a 55.7 percent decrease in the number of personal injury accidents on a major motorway in England.(January 2011)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

A Variable Speed Limit (VSL) system on the I-270/I-255 loop around St. Louis reduced the crash rate by 4.5 to 8 percent, due to more homogenous traffic speed in congested areas and slower traffic speed upstream.(October 2010)

17 percent reduction in NOx on "Ozone Action Days" with Variable Speed Limits.(September, 2006)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, variable speed limits reduced vehicle speeds by up to 5 km/h and contributed to smoother traffic flow during peak periods.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

Dedicated CAV lanes provide increased corridor capacity and a 25 percent reduction in vehicle travel times.(05/08/2019)

Connected automated vehicles may increase freeway capacity in Germany by 30 percent by 2070, while more conservative driving automated vehicles may have a slight negative impact in the interim period.(October 29 - November 2)

Cooperative V2V alert system can reduce overall travel times by 20 percent.

Simulation models show that roadside information used to gap-meter mainline traffic near freeway on-ramps can reduce delays related to merging traffic by 17 to 27 percent.(November 16, 2016)

Active Traffic Management system installed along I-66 reduces travel times by up to 11 percent and reduces vehicle delay by up to 68 percent(April 7, 2016)

Controlled motorways offer improved travel time reliability and less stress for drivers, but in some cases costs can outweigh benefits.(November 2004)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

Modeling effort shows Active Transportation Management systems can reduce average morning travel time by 21 percent on the I-270 corridor.(08/01/2018)

Ramp metering and dynamic speed limits shown to reduce congestion and shorten average travel times by about 2.5 minutes on a 7.8 km stretch of the A25 motorway in France.(September 4-6, 2017)

When combined, ramp metering and variable speed limits may reduce conflicts by 16.5 percent and crash odds by 6.0 percent in weaving segments.(January 2017)

Simulation models show that roadside information used to gap-meter mainline traffic near freeway on-ramps can reduce delays related to merging traffic by 17 to 27 percent.(November 16, 2016)

Dynamic ramp metering strategies designed to actively counter developing bottlenecks can reduce vehicle delay up to 48 percent.(06/01/2015)

Ramp metering system improved delay by 25 percent and reduced crashes by 22 percent per ramp meter in Auckland, New Zealand.(10/8/2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to increase person throughput 14 to 38 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce average travel times 48 to 58 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has projected benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 4:1 to 6:1.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM solution for the I-95/I-395 corridor would cost approximately $7.45 Million per year.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce fuel consumption 33 to 34 percent.(June 2014)

The implementation of ramp metering in Kansas City increased corridor throughput by as much as 20 percent and improved incident clearance by an average of four minutes, with these benefits remaining consistent in the long term.(April 2013)

The Kansas City Scout program used ramp meters to improve safety on a seven mile section of I-435; before and after data indicated that ramp meters decreased crashes by 64 percent.(2012)

The Kansas City Scout program used ramp meters to improve traffic flow and reduce overall peak period travel times on a seven mile section of I-435 by 1 to 4 percent.(2012)

Active ramp metering on critical freeway segments can reduce travel time variability 24 to 37 percent.(11/03/2011 12:00:00 AM)

Initial findings from a ramp meter evaluation in Kansas City were consistent with findings in other cities that show ramp metering can reduce crashes by 26 to 50 percent.(January 2011)

Initial findings from a ramp meter evaluation in Kansas City show that ramp meters make it easier for drivers to merge and reduce overall travel times.(January 2011)

Customers increased travel speeds by 180 to 220 percent during peak times on Miami-Dade I-95 HOT lanes with significant improvements in travel time reliability.(January 21, 2011)

ICM improves center-to-center communications, traveler information, and traffic management(October 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Full ITS deployment in the Seattle area projected to reduce recurrent congestion delays by 3.2 percent and incident related delays by 50 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects personal travel time reductions of 3.7 percent for drivers and 24 percent for transit users.(May 2005)

Full deployment of comprehensive ITS strategies in Seattle are projected to reduce CO, HC, and NOx emissions by 16 percent, 17 percent and 21 percent, respectively and reduce fuel consumption by 19 percent.(May 2005)

Full ITS deployment in Seattle projects vehicle speeds to increase by as much as 12 percent on major roadways.(May 2005)

In Salt Lake Valley, Utah a ramp metering study showed that with an 8 second metering cycle, mainline peak period delay decreased by 36 percent, or 54 seconds per vehicle.(March 2004)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that the number of commuters who supported a complete ramp meter shutdown declined significantly from 21 percent in 2000 to about 14 percent in 2001.(10 May 2002)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that freeway travel speeds decreased 5 to 10 percent and freeway travel times increased 5 to 10 percent between 2000 and 2001.(10 May 2002)

In Minneapolis-St.Paul, an evaluation of the effectiveness of ramp meters on four test corridors showed that the number of crashes recorded for the interim period with reduced ramp metering capacity was 15 percent higher that the average number of crashes measured for the previous fully metered periods. (10 May 2002)

The CORSIM simulation model has been used to estimate ramp metering speed improvements at the merge influence area under different ramp and mainline volumes, acceleration lane lengths, and number of lanes conditions, and the simulated outputs show that the average speeds at the merge influence areas increase when on-ramp junctions are metered, and that the increase is most prevalent under high traffic volumes, short acceleration lane, and low number of mainline lanes. (13-18 January 2002)

A simulation study in Minneapolis-St. Paul estimated that ramp metering decreased total system travel time by 6 to16 percent and increased average mainline speeds by 13 to 26 percent.( 13-17 January 2002)

A simulation study in Minneapolis-St. Paul estimated that ramp metering saved 2 to 55 percent of the fuel expended at each ramp.( 13-17 January 2002)

Simulations indicated that using a decision support tool to select alternative traffic control plans during non-recurring congestion in the Disney Land area of Anaheim, California could reduce travel time by 2 to 29 percent and decrease stop time by 15 to 56 percent. (December 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies can increase average vehicle speed, decreased average trip time, and reduce commuter delay by as much as 22 percent.(July 2001)

A simulation study of existing ITS (traveler information, ramp metering, and DMS) on a Detroit freeway demonstrated how these technologies were beneficial to corridor capacity.(July 2001)

Most drivers believed that traffic conditions worsened when the Minneapolis-St. Paul ramp metering system was shut down and 80 percent supported reactivation.(February 2001)

When the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was shut down, speeds fell by seven percent. (February 2001)

When the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was deactivated, crash frequency increased by 26 percent.(February 2001)

Net annual vehicle emissions increased by 1,160 tons and fuel consumption decreased by 5.5 million gallons when the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was shut down.(February 2001)

Volume decreased by 9 percent and peak period throughput was reduced by 14 percent when the ramp metering system on Minneapolis-St. Paul freeways was deactivated.(February 2001)

A study found that the benefit-to-cost ratio of the Minneapolis-St. Paul ramp metering system was 15:1.(February 2001)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland increased vehicle throughput 20 percent on arterials and 6 percent on freeways.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 59 percent of respondents thought that ramp metering was very helpful or fairly helpful.(January 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland improved network travel times by 10 percent.(January 2000)

A six year evaluation of freeway ramp metering in Arizona found that that the system reduced sideswipe accidents on the mainline by smoothing traffic flow, but increased rear-end accidents on entrance ramps where vehicles were required to slow down or stop unexpectedly.(August 1999)

In Glasgow, Scotland a freeway ramp metering system installed at an entrance ramp to the M8 motorway reduced the frequency of early merging by 29 percent.(12-16 October 1998)

In the St. Paul, Minnesota region ramp metering has increased throughput by 30 percent and increased peak period speeds by 60 percent.(November 1997)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

A 1995 North American survey of traffic management centers using ramp metering, identified reductions of 15 to 50 percent in freeway crashes.(June 1995)

In Glasglow, Scotland, ITS evaluation reports show that ramp metering can improve freeway capacity by 5 to 13 percent.(1994-1998)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Compared to using connected vehicle data alone, algorithms developed to estimate the positions of unequipped vehicles can result in up to an 8 percent reduction in delay.(12/01/2013)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

Simulation of an ATM monitoring system successfully demonstrates ability to avoid the severe consequences of cyberattacks, indicating significant potential in improving freeway operations.(03/01/2018)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to increase person throughput 14 to 38 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce average travel times 48 to 58 percent.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has projected benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 4:1 to 6:1.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM solution for the I-95/I-395 corridor would cost approximately $7.45 Million per year.(June 2014)

A multi-modal ICM strategy designed for the I-95/I-395 corridor has potential to reduce fuel consumption 33 to 34 percent.(June 2014)

ICM diversion route strategies can reduce average delay up to 26 percent, reduce average number of stops up to 42 percent, and increase average speeds up to 9 percent on arterials with traffic signal control.(07/01/2013)

A Bluetooth travel time detection system with seven detectors was integrated into a DMS roadside traveler information system for $90,000.(04/01/2013)

Bluetooth readers used to provide non-route specific travel time information on DMS were found useful by 76 percent of travelers surveyed.(04/01/2013)

The use of vehicle probes allowed North Carolina and South Carolina to monitor traffic at a quarter of the cost of microwave or radar detectors.(August 12, 2010)

New Jersey Department of Transportation enhanced incident management efficiency by using I-95 Corridor Coalition’s Vehicle Probe Project data, experiencing an estimated savings of $100,000 per incident in user delay costs.(August 12, 2010)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

In Finland, a benefit-cost analysis supported the deployment of weather information controlled variable speed limits on highly trafficked road segments.(25 March 2006)

A model indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced crash fatalities by 3.2 percent during peak periods.(4-7 June 2001)

Modeling indicated that an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati reduced delay by 0.2 minutes per trip during AM peak periods and by 0.6 minutes during PM peak periods. (4-7 June 2001)

Modeling found emissions reductions of 3.7 to 4.6 percent due to an advanced transportation management and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.(4-7 June 2001)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

More than 99 percent of surveyed users said they benefited from information provided by an advanced transportation management system and traveler information system serving northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. (June 1999)

Evaluation Report for ITS for Voluntary Emission Reduction: An ITS Operational Test for Real-Time Vehicle Emissions Detection(May 1997)

In Toronto, the COMPASS traffic monitoring and incident information dissemination system on Highway 401 decreased the average incident duration from 86 to 30 minutes per incident.(1997)

In Long Island, New York, ramp metering and traveler information increased freeway speeds by 13 percent despite an 5 percent increase in vehicle-miles traveled during PM peak periods.(January 1992)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 corridor in Dallas, Texas produced an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 20.4:1.(September 2010)

Continue to promote carpooling and transit services during an incremental deployment of Express Toll lanes.(03/21/2014)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Avoid using blank messages on dynamic message signs (DMS) including dashes for travel time applications as drivers may not understand these signs or assume they are broken.(December 2012)

Consider implementing interim traffic management systems (ITMS) for long-term construction projects.(July 31, 2011)

Using Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to Determine if Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) can Improve Corridor Operations(September 2010)

Enhance traffic flow in a regional, multi-state corridor by using vehicle probes to monitor real-time traffic conditions. (August 12, 2010)

Use vehicle probes to monitor traffic cost-effectively, manage incidents and queue ups proactively, reduce delays, and increase traveler satisfaction along a multi-state transportation corridor.(August 12, 2010)

Ensure proper placement of variable speed limit (VSL) signs in a work zone and operate the VSL system consistently on a long term basis.(03/01/2010)

In developing software for automated posting of messages on dynamic message signs, focus on the types of messages that are used often and changed frequently, and also include manual methods for posting.(01/30/2009)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Prepare in advance for severe weather by staffing enough snow plow operators and ensuring that public information systems will be updated with current weather and road conditions.(March 27, 2007 )

Draw on the strengths of complementary relationships between the public and private sectors for successful implementation of ITS projects.(August 2006)

Build a strong partnership between transportation and public safety agencies, and establish clear operational rules from the start.(July 2006)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Consult with traffic engineers early in the process of no-notice evacuations to secure the use of traffic management resources and to identify routes for evacuation and re-entry.(February 2006)

Develop a user-oriented system for displaying travel time messages on dynamic messages signs. (May, 2005)

Optimize travel time messaging operations by improving the way in which data is collected, analyzed, and displayed. (May, 2005)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Provide drivers with sufficient managed lane information that can be easily disseminated and understood. (2005)

Consider changeable message sign (CMS) positioning, data archive requirements, and traffic demand when considering deployment of a dynamic late merge system.(28 December 2004)

Follow accepted guidelines to create concise, effective messages to communicate to the public using Dynamic Message Signs (DMS).(August 2004)

Use recommended practices to provide accurate travel time messages to the public using Dynamic Message Signs (DMS).(7/16/2004)

Limit CMS message length to allow for adequate reading time at high speeds.(5/27/2004)

Strike a balance between CMS content and the driver's ability to read at 65 mph when posting AMBER alerts.(5/27/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Adopt adequate and thorough procurement processes which cover purchases of both standardized commodity type equipment and highly complex integrated ITS components.(9/23/2003)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Define your agency's expectations of a new system and a robust set of system requirements and then choose the software that meets your requirements.(4/1/2003)

Deploy ITS systems strategically to achieve benefits.(6/1/2001)

Integrate freeway and alternate route operations to achieve greater benefits.(6/1/2001)

Use ITS Standards to achieve interchangeability and interoperability for Dynamic Message Signs.(Spring 2001)

Consider reconfiguring and integrating existing roadway management IT systems whenever possible to save costs associated with implementing new systems.(10/1/2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Provide consistent and high-quality information to influence traveler behavior.(6/1/1998)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Provide drivers with sufficient managed lane information that can be easily disseminated and understood. (2005)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Provide consistent and high-quality information to influence traveler behavior.(6/1/1998)

Industry Experts Offer Recommendations for Enterprise-wide Security Controls for the Connected Vehicle Environment.(05/01/2017)

Keep technical solutions open-ended in the early stages of an ITS research project, and follow a research oriented contract vehicle.(May 16, 2007)

Recognize staffing and communication needs for Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) projects.(April 2006)

Recognize integration issues in Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) Projects, and follow the systems engineering approach to establish a project's foundation.(April 2006)

Assess needs and communication infrastructure capabilities for the design of an Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS).(April 2006)

Use non-proprietary software for ITS projects to ensure compatibility with other ITS components(2001)

Develop a regional ITS architecture with a common data server to facilitate ITS integration in a region(2001)

Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Identify innovative solutions for deploying Information Stations that report real-time data for weather and traffic monitoring in the event of a hurricane.(11/1/2003)

Develop partnerships for a cost-effective approach to deploy remote traffic count stations that will provide real-time traffic data during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Requiring HOT lane users to be subject to visual inspection systems can help quantify and limit the number of occupancy violators in managed lanes.(07/14/2015)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Continue to promote carpooling and transit services during an incremental deployment of Express Toll lanes.(03/21/2014)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Consider the appropriateness of different lane management strategies.(November, 2004)

Engage in comprehensive planning and coordination of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in active management of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Ensure that privatization agreements for the management of toll lanes retain the right for the public agency to improve upon or build transportation facilities that may potentially compete with the privatized toll lanes.(December 2000)

Strengthen public acceptance of congestion-based pricing of express lanes by preserving the option to use free lanes, maintaining good levels of service, and prioritizing safety.(December 2000)

A Federal report highlights best practices for ITS programs that plan to implement connected vehicle (CV) technology.(07/01/2018)

Consider various toll methods to push traffic demand away from peak hours.(September, 2006)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Cast a broad net in evaluating traveler behavior: Managed Lanes analysis finds evidence of "theory blindness" that can impact model accuracy.(January 2018)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Continue to promote carpooling and transit services during an incremental deployment of Express Toll lanes.(03/21/2014)

Engage political champions to keep controversial High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lane projects on track.(15 December 2011)

For successful implementation of a road pricing program, strive for simplicity in policy goals and strong championing of the program by the executive and legislative leaders.(12/01/2010)

Consider stakeholder outreach and education, transport modes that offer an alternative to driving, performance measurement, and area geography with high importance in the planning phase for road pricing programs.(12/01/2010)

Be prepared to face the opportunities and challenges posed by political timetables, project deadlines, as well as pricing-equity issues for road pricing procurement and implementation.(12/01/2010)

Define clear goals and pay attention to key institutional and technical factors for successful implementation of road pricing programs.(12/01/2010)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Address toll enforcement issues during the initial phase of planning process; with particular attention paid to the legal structure and potential enforcement technologies. (September, 2006)

Ensure electronic toll collection systems are interoperable with neighboring toll facilities.(September, 2006)

Evaluate pros and cons of different methods for electronic toll collection.(September, 2006)

Avoid privacy concerns by ensuring that protecting legislation is in place prior to implementing tolling technologies.(September, 2006)

Optimize back office tolling operations.(September, 2006)

Consider various toll methods to push traffic demand away from peak hours.(September, 2006)

Consider tolling as a tool for managing travel demand and increasing efficiency, as well as for generating revenue.(2006)

Consider the appropriateness of different lane management strategies.(November, 2004)

Utilize public education and outreach in managed lane projects.(November, 2004)

Consider operational issues of electronic toll collection and enforcement with value pricing projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in comprehensive planning and coordination of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in active management of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Ensure effective public and stakeholder outreach in order to garner support for HOT lanes. (March 2003)

Utilize standard highway project management procedures and tools to successfully implement HOT lane projects.(March 2003)

Set toll prices and vehicle occupancy requirements to maintain favorable travel conditions on HOT lanes. (March 2003)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Ensure that privatization agreements for the management of toll lanes retain the right for the public agency to improve upon or build transportation facilities that may potentially compete with the privatized toll lanes.(December 2000)

Strengthen public acceptance of congestion-based pricing of express lanes by preserving the option to use free lanes, maintaining good levels of service, and prioritizing safety.(December 2000)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Pavement friction sensors should target travel lanes instead of shoulder areas where wet pavement can persist causing VSL systems to reduce traffic speeds without need.(08/09/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Deploy a variable speed limit system only after the software systems required to support it are mature and reliable. (01/30/2009)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

USDOT identifies ten characteristics that support an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) approach to improving throughput and reducing congestion.(11/01/2018)

Best practices to support the arrival of smart mobility for non-urban communities.(03/15/2018)

Develop a Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) to achieve quality in project development and ultimately produce a successful ICMS. (February 2012)

Develop a Concept of Operations to define the system that will be built.(February 2012)

Plan for success of an ICM project by developing a knowledgeable and committed project team that can provide oversight, direction, and necessary reviews.(February 2012)

Coordinate among stakeholders and schedule periodic team meetings to make sure that the correct and necessary information is provided for all development and implementation activities.(February 2012)

Analyze individual design possibilities to determine which are feasible, which provide the best performance, and which would be the most cost effective methods of system implementation.(February 2012)

Develop a list of factors and metrics to analyze system performance to determine when system replacement or retirement may become necessary.(February 2012)

Adequately train all operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel and conduct regularly scheduled team meetings to continually improve processes and procedures as the ICM system operations matures.(February 2012)

Foster Champions and Organize Stakeholders when initiating an effort to consider ICM for a regional corridor. (February 2012)

Develop a logical architecture as one key resource for describing what the Integrated Corridor Management System (ICMS) will do.(February 2012)

Write well-formed requirements from the perspective of the system and not the system user that are concise and include data elements that are uniquely identifiable.(February 2012)

Grow regional road pricing policies from individual projects and develop modeling tools that reflect a wide range of impacts.(09/13/2010)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

USDOT identifies ten characteristics that support an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) approach to improving throughput and reducing congestion.(11/01/2018)

Enhance traffic flow in a regional, multi-state corridor by using vehicle probes to monitor real-time traffic conditions. (August 12, 2010)

Use vehicle probes to monitor traffic cost-effectively, manage incidents and queue ups proactively, reduce delays, and increase traveler satisfaction along a multi-state transportation corridor.(August 12, 2010)

Develop an effective evacuation plan for special event that gathers a large audience and consider co-locating the responding agencies in a joint command center.(01/30/2009)

Strengthen the ability to coordinate and manage operations for planned special events by co-locating a traffic management center with a public safety center with representatives from police, fire and 9-1-1.(November 2008)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Define your agency's expectations of a new system and a robust set of system requirements and then choose the software that meets your requirements.(4/1/2003)

Employ a proactive approach for building public awareness of the project requiring a work zone and deliver accurate information to the public. (November 2002)

Identify innovative solutions for deploying Information Stations that report real-time data for weather and traffic monitoring in the event of a hurricane.(11/1/2003)

Implement travel demand management and ITS strategies to successfully reduce congestion and delay during special events.(2003)

Develop partnerships for a cost-effective approach to deploy remote traffic count stations that will provide real-time traffic data during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Plan your system to accommodate future expansion.(October, 2008)

Develop a project champion succession plan within participating organizations to avoid orphaning a project.( 2 March 2007)

Anticipate and plan for delays in deployment related to weather and the physical environment.(12/1/2003)

Consider potential system enhancements to meet heavy demand.(4/1/2003)

Define your agency's expectations of a new system and a robust set of system requirements and then choose the software that meets your requirements.(4/1/2003)

A Federal report highlights best practices for ITS programs that plan to implement connected vehicle (CV) technology.(07/01/2018)

Perform early real-world testing of connected vehicle technology with actual infrastructure in place to verify end-to-end system/application performance (10/02/2017)

Collect traffic and travel time data from all traffic lanes because travel times can vary substantially between lanes.(02/01/2016)

Enhance traffic flow in a regional, multi-state corridor by using vehicle probes to monitor real-time traffic conditions. (August 12, 2010)

Use vehicle probes to monitor traffic cost-effectively, manage incidents and queue ups proactively, reduce delays, and increase traveler satisfaction along a multi-state transportation corridor.(August 12, 2010)

Beware of costs, utility, reliability, and maintenance issues in deploying a statewide transportation network monitoring system. (01/30/2009)

Design traffic video transmission systems around the constraints of bandwidth limitations and provide provisions for remote configuration of video compression hardware.(01/30/2009)

Beware of challenges involved in developing an integrated statewide operations system for traffic monitoring, incident data capture, weather information, and traveler information—all seamlessly controlled by a central software system. (01/30/2009)

To support statewide traveler information services, design and implement reliable interface software processes to capture incident data from the local and highway patrol police’s computer aided dispatch systems.(01/30/2009)

Beware that modeling may not be a suitable substitute for before-after studies of ITS integration projects.(14 May 2008)

Recognize that deployment delays can lead to a ripple effect of challenges that affect project deployment progress.( 2 March 2007)

Develop a project champion succession plan within participating organizations to avoid orphaning a project.( 2 March 2007)

Beware that inter-agency funding arrangements can lead to delays in awarding and executing project contracts.( 2 March 2007)

Build a strong partnership between transportation and public safety agencies, and establish clear operational rules from the start.(July 2006)

Promote local use of archived data for performance monitoring as a means of improving the interpretation of system performance at the national level. (10/1/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Integrate freeway and alternate route operations to achieve greater benefits.(6/1/2001)

Forge a partnership among the local public sector agencies managing transportation operations along a multi-jurisdictional corridor and the private sector for deployment and integration of ITS.(April 2000)

Follow a modular approach when deploying complex projects in locations with a shortened construction season.(April 2000)

Use tested and effective traffic management systems for Transportation Management Centers (TMCs). (10/1/1999)

Beware of accuracy and privacy issues in using truck transponder data for developing real-time traveler information applications.(August 2009)