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Freeway Management > Lane Management


Lane management applications can promote the most effective use of available capacity on freeways to encourage the use of high-occupancy commute modes.


Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Identify innovative solutions for deploying Information Stations that report real-time data for weather and traffic monitoring in the event of a hurricane.(11/1/2003)

Develop partnerships for a cost-effective approach to deploy remote traffic count stations that will provide real-time traffic data during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Requiring HOT lane users to be subject to visual inspection systems can help quantify and limit the number of occupancy violators in managed lanes.(07/14/2015)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Continue to promote carpooling and transit services during an incremental deployment of Express Toll lanes.(03/21/2014)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Consider the appropriateness of different lane management strategies.(November, 2004)

Engage in comprehensive planning and coordination of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in active management of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Ensure that privatization agreements for the management of toll lanes retain the right for the public agency to improve upon or build transportation facilities that may potentially compete with the privatized toll lanes.(December 2000)

Strengthen public acceptance of congestion-based pricing of express lanes by preserving the option to use free lanes, maintaining good levels of service, and prioritizing safety.(December 2000)

A Federal report highlights best practices for ITS programs that plan to implement connected vehicle (CV) technology.(07/01/2018)

Consider various toll methods to push traffic demand away from peak hours.(September, 2006)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Cast a broad net in evaluating traveler behavior: Managed Lanes analysis finds evidence of "theory blindness" that can impact model accuracy.(January 2018)

Future ICM systems will require new technical skill sets. Involve management across multiple levels to help agencies understand each other’s needs, capabilities, and priorities.(06/30/2015)

Continue to promote carpooling and transit services during an incremental deployment of Express Toll lanes.(03/21/2014)

Engage political champions to keep controversial High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lane projects on track.(15 December 2011)

For successful implementation of a road pricing program, strive for simplicity in policy goals and strong championing of the program by the executive and legislative leaders.(12/01/2010)

Consider stakeholder outreach and education, transport modes that offer an alternative to driving, performance measurement, and area geography with high importance in the planning phase for road pricing programs.(12/01/2010)

Be prepared to face the opportunities and challenges posed by political timetables, project deadlines, as well as pricing-equity issues for road pricing procurement and implementation.(12/01/2010)

Define clear goals and pay attention to key institutional and technical factors for successful implementation of road pricing programs.(12/01/2010)

Use Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) to identify gaps, determine constraints, and invest in the best combination of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies.(September 2008)

Address toll enforcement issues during the initial phase of planning process; with particular attention paid to the legal structure and potential enforcement technologies. (September, 2006)

Ensure electronic toll collection systems are interoperable with neighboring toll facilities.(September, 2006)

Evaluate pros and cons of different methods for electronic toll collection.(September, 2006)

Avoid privacy concerns by ensuring that protecting legislation is in place prior to implementing tolling technologies.(September, 2006)

Optimize back office tolling operations.(September, 2006)

Consider various toll methods to push traffic demand away from peak hours.(September, 2006)

Consider tolling as a tool for managing travel demand and increasing efficiency, as well as for generating revenue.(2006)

Consider the appropriateness of different lane management strategies.(November, 2004)

Utilize public education and outreach in managed lane projects.(November, 2004)

Consider operational issues of electronic toll collection and enforcement with value pricing projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in comprehensive planning and coordination of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Engage in active management of managed lanes projects.(November, 2004)

Ensure effective public and stakeholder outreach in order to garner support for HOT lanes. (March 2003)

Utilize standard highway project management procedures and tools to successfully implement HOT lane projects.(March 2003)

Set toll prices and vehicle occupancy requirements to maintain favorable travel conditions on HOT lanes. (March 2003)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

Ensure that privatization agreements for the management of toll lanes retain the right for the public agency to improve upon or build transportation facilities that may potentially compete with the privatized toll lanes.(December 2000)

Strengthen public acceptance of congestion-based pricing of express lanes by preserving the option to use free lanes, maintaining good levels of service, and prioritizing safety.(December 2000)

Effectively communicate plans for implementing contraflow lanes during a hurricane evacuation.(11/1/2003)

Pavement friction sensors should target travel lanes instead of shoulder areas where wet pavement can persist causing VSL systems to reduce traffic speeds without need.(08/09/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Deploy a variable speed limit system only after the software systems required to support it are mature and reliable. (01/30/2009)

Enable and enforce managed lane facilities using various ITS tools.(January 2003)

USDOT identifies ten characteristics that support an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) approach to improving throughput and reducing congestion.(11/01/2018)

Best practices to support the arrival of smart mobility for non-urban communities.(03/15/2018)

Develop a Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) to achieve quality in project development and ultimately produce a successful ICMS. (February 2012)

Develop a Concept of Operations to define the system that will be built.(February 2012)

Plan for success of an ICM project by developing a knowledgeable and committed project team that can provide oversight, direction, and necessary reviews.(February 2012)

Coordinate among stakeholders and schedule periodic team meetings to make sure that the correct and necessary information is provided for all development and implementation activities.(February 2012)

Analyze individual design possibilities to determine which are feasible, which provide the best performance, and which would be the most cost effective methods of system implementation.(February 2012)

Develop a list of factors and metrics to analyze system performance to determine when system replacement or retirement may become necessary.(February 2012)

Adequately train all operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel and conduct regularly scheduled team meetings to continually improve processes and procedures as the ICM system operations matures.(February 2012)

Foster Champions and Organize Stakeholders when initiating an effort to consider ICM for a regional corridor. (February 2012)

Develop a logical architecture as one key resource for describing what the Integrated Corridor Management System (ICMS) will do.(February 2012)

Write well-formed requirements from the perspective of the system and not the system user that are concise and include data elements that are uniquely identifiable.(February 2012)

Grow regional road pricing policies from individual projects and develop modeling tools that reflect a wide range of impacts.(09/13/2010)

Iowa DOT estimates that AV adoption could increase freeway lane capacity up to 26 percent on I-80.(January 2018)

Low Emissions Zones concept can potentially reduce emissions by 15-18 percent.(January 2015)

Speed harmonization reduced delay by 7.6 percent as an eco-lanes application.(January 2014)

Eco-lanes system with eco-cruise control reduced fuel consumption by 4.5 percent, in addition to reducing HC, CO, and CO2 emissions.(January 2014)

Speed harmonization reduced fuel consumption by 6.3 percent in addition to reducing HC, CO, NOx, and CO2 emissions.(January 2014)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

The cost to evaluate ICM using AMS tools was estimated at five percent of the deployment budget.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

In San Diego, ICM improves mobility for most commuters on I-15 saving them more than 1,400 person hours each day during peak commute periods.(12/01/2016)

Gross toll revenue of the I-10 ExpressLanes was $8,918,985 and I-110 ExpressLanes was $18,704,961 in the first 16 months of HOT lane operation.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes on I-10 and I-110 in Los Angeles was projected to provide transit riders a travel time benefit of $9,186,074 over a 10-year period.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

HOT lane conversion improved travel times during peak periods and influenced 49 percent of new I-85 Xpress bus riders to start using transit.(03/21/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Benefits from an initial HOT lanes deployment in Minneapolis St. Paul were maintained in the long term, while a system expansion resulted in fewer benefits, but at a much cheaper cost.(April 2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

In Minneapolis, converting HOV to HOT lanes with dynamic pricing increased peak period throughput by 9 to 33 percent.(August 2008)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Simulation shows an optimized CAV control framework can increase the effective capacity of high-volume corridors.(3/18/19)

Simulation shows V2I applications that use real-time traffic data to recommend merge maneuvers can increase throughput 18 to 22 percent compared to existing systems that use message displays on overhead gantries.(01/13/2019)

Part-time shoulder simulated to decrease travel time by up to 1.86 minutes per kilometer along congested segments of Philadelphia interstate.(11/21/18)

An Active Traffic Management System (ATM) on I-66 in Northern Virginia reduced total (all severity), multiple-vehicle (all severity), and rear-end (all severity) crashes, 6 percent, 10 percent, and 11 percent, respectively.(10/01/2018)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

During an incident, motorists can see up to a 50 percent savings in travel time with MDOT’s Flex Route lane control system.(11/13/2017)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

The cost to evaluate ICM using AMS tools was estimated at five percent of the deployment budget.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

Agencies that manage multimodal transportation corridors can use AMS methodology with ICM decision support systems to facilitate predictive, real-time, and scenario-based decision-making.(12/01/2016)

In San Diego, ICM improves mobility for most commuters on I-15 saving them more than 1,400 person hours each day during peak commute periods.(12/01/2016)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, fuel consumption increased at an estimated cost of $104,566,154 with increased VMT.(08/31/2015)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes in Los Angeles increased vehicle throughput on I-10 and I-110, however, net emissions increased by 26 to 82 percent and by 6 to 21 percent, respectively as VMT increased.(08/31/2015)

Survey of HOT lane toll transponder holders found deployment of HOT lanes did not change carpooling habits of 66 percent of respondents; 65 percent of respondents who drove alone continued to do so.(08/31/2015)

Deployment of HOT lanes reduced travel times by 10 minutes during A.M. peak and 19 minutes during P.M. peak.(07/14/2015)

HOV to HOT lane conversions can improve travel times and travel time reliability in Express Lanes although impacts on general purpose lanes are mixed.(05/01/2015)

Deployment of variable rate, all-electronic, open road tolling on SR-520 Bridge near Seattle yielded $55 million of revenue in 2012.(12/02/2014)

Data indicates that total saved value of travel time on variable tolling lanes can reach 11 percent of the total value of time spent travelling compared to uniform tolling rates.(03/02/2014)

HOV to HOT Lane conversion results in 22 percent reduction in annual vehicle hours of delay.(06/01/2013)

Conversion of HOV facilities to HOT facilities finds a benefit-cost ratio of 2.19, with benefits primarily derived from improved safety.(02/01/2012)

The conversion of HOV to HOT lanes on I-394 reduced mainline crashes by 5.3 percent.(23-27 January 2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Conversion of an HOV lane to a HOT lane in Washington State allowed for a 3 to 19 percent increase in speeds in general purpose lanes despite a 2 to 3 percent increase in volumes in the general lanes.(November 19, 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego yielded an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 9.7:1.(September 2010)

Benefit-to-cost estimates for dynamic pricing applications on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from 1.1 to 8.2.(September 2010)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

Traffic volumes doubled from 10,000 trips per week to 20,000 trips per week in HOT lanes without negative effects on speeds.(November 2006)

Speeds in general purpose lanes slightly increased with the implementation of HOT lanes.(November 2006)

Value pricing has been shown to increase revenue, reduce congestion by maximizing lane capacity and reduce travel time of highway transportation.(27 February 2003)

End-of-Queue Warning system installed along I-35 in Texas estimated to have reduced crashes by 44 percent, resulting in $1.36 million in reduced crash costs (over a one year period).(01/10/2016)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Simulation shows an optimized CAV control framework can increase the effective capacity of high-volume corridors.(3/18/19)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can improve throughput by 21 percent with 10 percent market penetration.(June 4-7, 2018)

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and Dynamic Speed Harmonization (DSH) applications that share dedicated lanes with HOVs can reduce fuel consumption by more than 16 percent.(June 4-7, 2018)

Track testing suggests stop-and-go freeway traffic flow can be controlled to increase throughput by 15 percent with as few as 5 percent autonomous vehicles in the traffic stream.(05/04/2017)

Track testing suggests stop-and-go freeway traffic can be controlled to reduce fuel consumption by 40 percent with as few as 5 percent autonomous vehicles in the traffic stream.(05/04/2017)

Simulation models show that an optimal control speed harmonization strategy can reduce per-vehicle travel time by 28 to 32 percent.(January 8, 2017)

Simulation models show that an optimal control speed harmonization strategy can reduce per-vehicle fuel consumption by 12 to 17 percent.(January 8, 2017)

Volunteer drivers equipped with CV technologies saw immediate value in queue warning applications.(06/19/2015)

Speed Harmonization and Queue Warning may reduce extreme, unsafe speed drops with average speeds reduced by up to 20 percent.(June 1, 2015)

Eco-Speed Harmonization and Eco-Connected Adaptive Cruise Control applications show results of up to a 22 percent reduction in energy and a 33 percent reduction in travel time.

Tractor-trailer platooning enabled by V2V communications demonstrates fuel savings up to 9.7 percent.(September 2014)

Eco-Lane and Speed Harmonization simulation results in up to 6.3 percent reduction in fuel consumption and 4.6 percent reduction in CO2 emissions.(August 1, 2013)

Variable Speed Limits (VSL) cut crash rates by more than half during low visibility on I-77 in Virginia.(09/01/2018)

In a recurring congestion scenario, ramp metering, variable speed limits, and hard shoulder running found to improve corridor travel time and network performance by 5 to 16 percent. (09/01/2018)

An implementation of proactive variable speed limits (VSL) was simulated to reduce critical traffic conditions by 39 percent.(February 2018)

Ramp metering and dynamic speed limits shown to reduce congestion and shorten average travel times by about 2.5 minutes on a 7.8 km stretch of the A25 motorway in France.(September 4-6, 2017)

Dynamic Speed Limit Systems in Belgium found to have decreased the number of injury crashes by 18 percent.(July 4, 2017)

When combined, ramp metering and variable speed limits may reduce conflicts by 16.5 percent and crash odds by 6.0 percent in weaving segments.(January 2017)

Variable speed limit pilot found to be effective reducing the number of overall crashes. (08/09/2015)

Variable speed limit systems reduced the number and severity of crashes at three pilot sites in Texas. Benefit-to-Cost ratios ranged from 7:1 to 14:1.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Variable speed limit system site selection should be rigorous and incorporate analysis of existing speed profiles and roadway ingress/egress characteristics to assure proper spacing of VSL systems and sensor inputs.(06/01/2015)

Advisory Variable Speed Limit System in Portland, Oregon reduces speed variation and the number of crashes in the area.(May 18, 2015)

In Smart Zone work zones, 71 percent of local resident survey respondents found variable speed limit signs useful.(January 28, 2015)

Variable speed limits have safety benefits and a homogenizing effect, but a German study found no increase in freeway capacity.(January 13, 2013)

Variable Speed Limit model yields up to 42.4 percent reduction on number of vehicle stops and 17.6 percent reduction on the average travel time.(01/01/2013)

Implementing variable mandatory speed limits on four lanes with the optional use of the hard shoulder as a running lane resulted in a 55.7 percent decrease in the number of personal injury accidents on a major motorway in England.(January 2011)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

A Variable Speed Limit (VSL) system on the I-270/I-255 loop around St. Louis reduced the crash rate by 4.5 to 8 percent, due to more homogenous traffic speed in congested areas and slower traffic speed upstream.(October 2010)

17 percent reduction in NOx on "Ozone Action Days" with Variable Speed Limits.(September, 2006)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, variable speed limits reduced vehicle speeds by up to 5 km/h and contributed to smoother traffic flow during peak periods.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

A study of travelers on Snoqualmie Pass, WA found that DMS can decrease mean driving speeds and reduce accident severity.(December 2001)

It was estimated that variable speed limit signs and lane control signals installed on the autobahn in Germany would generate cost savings due to crash reductions that would be equal to the cost of the system within two to three years of deployment. (August 1999)

Advanced traffic management systems in the Netherlands and Germany reduced crash rates by 20 to 23 percent.(August 1999)

Dedicated CAV lanes provide increased corridor capacity and a 25 percent reduction in vehicle travel times.(05/08/2019)

Connected automated vehicles may increase freeway capacity in Germany by 30 percent by 2070, while more conservative driving automated vehicles may have a slight negative impact in the interim period.(October 29 - November 2)

Cooperative V2V alert system can reduce overall travel times by 20 percent.

Simulation models show that roadside information used to gap-meter mainline traffic near freeway on-ramps can reduce delays related to merging traffic by 17 to 27 percent.(November 16, 2016)

Active Traffic Management system installed along I-66 reduces travel times by up to 11 percent and reduces vehicle delay by up to 68 percent(April 7, 2016)

Controlled motorways offer improved travel time reliability and less stress for drivers, but in some cases costs can outweigh benefits.(November 2004)

The proposed cost to program, configure, and integrate CMS devices and CCTV cameras into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $45,000 to $52,000.(04/04/2016)

The proposed cost to test the function of a CMS and CCTV camera system integrated into a TOC communications network in California ranged from $18,000 to $21,000.(04/04/2016)

Transit improvements, carpooling campaign, and HOV to HOT conversion demonstration project cost $70,460,779 for capital and $55,896,725 for ongoing maintenance.(03/21/2014)

Capital costs of HOV conversion to HOT lanes total $8,716,000 with annual operating costs beginning at $1,294,922.(02/01/2012)

Between 2003 and 2007, annual operating costs and revenues at 15 tolling agencies averaged $85.825 million and $265.753 million, respectively.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

The cost to convert two reversible high-occupancy vehicle lanes on an eight-mile stretch of the Interstate-15 in San Diego to high-occupancy toll lanes was $1.85 million. Evidence also suggests that costs to build new high-occupancy toll lanes are substantially higher, but financially feasible.(Spring 2000)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

Costs to deploy an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) system in Minneapolis for ten years is estimated at $3.96 million.(November 2010)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

Cost of constructing new managed lane facilities ranged from $6 million to $23 million per mile in the Minneapolis area.(November 2006)

Transit improvements, carpooling campaign, and HOV to HOT conversion demonstration project cost $70,460,779 for capital and $55,896,725 for ongoing maintenance.(03/21/2014)

Capital costs of HOV conversion to HOT lanes total $8,716,000 with annual operating costs beginning at $1,294,922.(02/01/2012)

Between 2003 and 2007, annual operating costs and revenues at 15 tolling agencies averaged $85.825 million and $265.753 million, respectively.(2011)

Operating costs of Mileage-based user fee programs can be as low as 7 percent of total system revenue and are more cost-effective than many other types of variable pricing systems.(2011)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the I-15 Corridor in San Diego, California is estimated to cost $1.42 million annualized and a total 10-year life-cycle cost of $12 million.(September 2010)

Economies of scale reduced projections for MnPass managed lanes operations & maintenance costs to $50,000 per mile.(September 2010)

The total 10-year project cost of implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 Corridor in Dallas, Texas is estimated at $13.6 million with annualized costs of $1.62 million per year.(September 2010)

Capital cost estimates to implement MnPASS dynamic pricing on freeway shoulder lanes ranged from $6 million to $23 million per mile.(September 2010)

Planning-level studies indicate that an effective combination of ICM strategies can be implemented for $7.5 Million per year (annualized capital and O&M).(September 2008)

Cost estimates of operational concepts for converting HOV lanes to managed lanes on I-75/I-575 in Georgia range from $20.9 million to $23.7 million.(April 2006)

In San Diego County, the cost to implement ETC with managed lanes on a 26 mile section of I-5 was estimated at $1.7 million.(April 2006)

Value pricing is proposed to cost $32,625,000 over 3-years on a congested North Texas freeway(June 2005)

The cost to convert two reversible high-occupancy vehicle lanes on an eight-mile stretch of the Interstate-15 in San Diego to high-occupancy toll lanes was $1.85 million. Evidence also suggests that costs to build new high-occupancy toll lanes are substantially higher, but financially feasible.(Spring 2000)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

An Active Traffic Management (ATM) system covering 12.4 miles of I-66 in Northern Virginia cost $39 million.(09/01/2016)

Minnesota's Smart Lanes using intelligent lane control signals (ILCS) and real-time transit and traffic DMS cost $22.6 million to install and $300K annually to operate.(January 4, 2013)

Initial deployment of 47 variable speed limit signs to cost $12.5 million (CAD)(December 3, 2015)

Capital costs to install temporary Variable Speed Limit (VSL) systems in Texas ranged from $91K to $180K.(06/01/2015)

A variable speed limit system consisting of multiple ITS components and covering 40 miles over the Snoqualmie Pass in Washington was designed and implemented for $5 million.(November 2001)

More than $224 million will be invested in Ohio’s 33 Smart Mobility Corridor by 2020.(03/15/2018)

Omnidirectional Antenna - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Wireless Repeater - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Fiber Optic Splice - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

GBIC Transceiver - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Wireless Transceiver - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Ethernet Switch - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Ethernet Switch - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Network Switch - Capital cost/unit - $5917.79(2013)

Smarter Highways gantry (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Smarter Highways gantry (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Lane control gates - Capital cost/unit - $125000 - O&M cost/unit - $6500(February 2009)

Lane control gates - Capital cost/unit - $125000 - O&M cost/unit - $6500(February 2009)

Software for Lane Control - Capital cost/unit - $300000 - O&M cost/unit - $15000(5 August 2004)

Lane Control Gates - Capital cost/unit - $300000 - O&M cost/unit - $15000(5 August 2004)

Lane Control Signal System - Capital cost/unit - $45743.9078947368(May 2000)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

High-Occupancy Toll Lane (HOT lane) - Capital cost/unit - $9500000 - O&M cost/unit - $50000 - Lifetime - 20 years(September 2010)

Reversible Lane System - Capital cost/unit - $1931000 - O&M cost/unit - $132000 - Lifetime - 15 years(2007)

Smarter Highways gantry (high estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Smarter Highways gantry (low estimate) - Capital cost/unit - $900000(November 19, 2010)

Variable Speed Display - Capital cost/unit - $108000(April 2010)

Variable Speed Limit System - Capital cost/unit - $691000 - Lifetime - 30 years(6/21/2004)

Variable Speed Display Sign - Capital cost/unit - $16000 - Lifetime - 15 years(6/21/2004)