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Roadway Operations & Maintenance


ITS applications in operations and maintenance focus on integrated management of maintenance fleets, specialized service vehicles, hazardous road conditions remediation, and work zone mobility and safety. These applications monitor, analyze, and disseminate roadway and infrastructure data for operational, maintenance, and managerial uses. ITS can help secure the safety of workers and travelers in a work zone while facilitating traffic flow through and around the construction area. This is often achieved through the temporary deployment of other ITS services, such as elements of traffic management and incident management programs.


Adopt best practices for integrating emergency information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to improve performance and increase public mobility, safety and security.(2/28/2006)

Invest in research and development for emergency integration.(2/28/2006)

Extend the application of emergency integration best practices to further improve emergency operations.(2/28/2006)

Integrate weather information into Transportation Management Center (TMC) operations to enhance the ability of operators to manage traffic in a more responsive and effective way during weather events.(2/28/2006)

Design the system to withstand the demands of the physical environment in which it will be deployed.(4/1/2002)

Design and tailor system technology to deliver information of useful quality and quantity, that the user can reasonably absorb.(4/1/2002)

State of the practice assessment identifies emerging trends in the procurement of CV technology; concludes that different procurement approaches have been and can be successfully used for purchasing CV equipment, systems, and services.(1/24/2019)

Infrastructure integrating the next generation internet standard (IPV6) is crucial to support the future growth of connected vehicle networks.(12/13/2018)

"Smart City" Planners are encouraged to emphasize the interconnectedness of mobility solutions with community goals, whether or not those solutions are perceived of as being high-tech.(11/12/2018)

Study finds that certain confined spaces prohibit the use of large aerial drones to inspect bridges; areas for improvement remain to reduce the training and skill required to operate these devices.(08/04/2018)

Probe vehicle data provide a "flexible and robust" basis for identifying inefficient arterial corridors.(08/01/2018)

Tampa (THEA) Connected Vehicle Pilot investigates roadside unit transient surge immunity and learns the importance of proper grounding.(11/01/2017)

Labor costs required to collect and prepare highway inventory datasets can range from $72 to $1,075 per mile.(2014)

LiDAR scanning systems collect huge amounts of geospatial data in a very short time; plan for major data reduction efforts that require intensive computing, software development, and technical expertise.(2014)

Integrate Road Weather Information Systems program and Transportation Management Centers to improve internal operations practices.(November 2009)

Follow a rigorous financial approach for estimating the true costs & savings from outsourcing highway maintenance services.(7 January 2004)

Outreach efforts identify near-term action items to promote connected vehicle deployment in rural areas.(08/25/2017)

In work zone areas, dynamic message signs are most effective at night and when alerting drivers of the presence of workers.(June 3, 2017)

Use text-only messages instead of graphic-aided messages on dynamic message signs during traffic slow-downs.(02/29/2016)

Avoid unnecessarily restrictive requirements and ambiguous terms in bid documents.(04/01/2013)

Strengthen the ability to coordinate and manage operations for planned special events by co-locating a traffic management center with a public safety center with representatives from police, fire and 9-1-1.(November 2008)

Use portable ITS equipment to monitor and control traffic flow at major signalized intersections located at entrance and exit points near planned special events.(November 2008)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Consider changeable message sign (CMS) positioning, data archive requirements, and traffic demand when considering deployment of a dynamic late merge system.(28 December 2004)

Coordinate extensively with other stakeholder agencies.(1/1/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Treat maintenance staff as customers and beneficiaries of ATIS information.(5/1/2005)

Treat system operators as the client and consider their perspectives during ATIS project development.(5/1/2005)

Consider how implementing an ATIS system will impact staffing and training requirements.(5/1/2005)

Consider that ATIS deployment in rural and/or remote areas presents special challenges.(5/1/2005)

Coordinate extensively with other stakeholder agencies.(1/1/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Provide traveler information in rural areas to allow for good travel decisions in inclement weather and construction season.(November 2001)

Texas DOT offers recommendations and best practices for agencies looking to anticipate widescale implementation of connected and automated vehicles.(10/1/16)

Use truck-mounted radar speed signs to help reduce vehicle speeds through continuously moving and intermittent mobile work operations.(01/01/2016)

Integrate Road Weather Information Systems program and Transportation Management Centers to improve internal operations practices.(November 2009)

Clearly define information sharing procedures among agencies in an integrated Transportation Management Center-Computer Aided Dispatch system.(July 2006)

Recognize staffing and communication needs for Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) projects.(April 2006)

Recognize integration issues in Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) Projects, and follow the systems engineering approach to establish a project's foundation.(April 2006)

Assess needs and communication infrastructure capabilities for the design of an Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS).(April 2006)

Build public awareness of large-scale construction projects and keep the public informed of work zone schedules to help minimize the associated travel impacts.(1/1/2004)

Develop a regional ITS architecture with a common data server to facilitate ITS integration in a region(2001)

Plan adequate time to calibrate Bluetooth readers to maximize accuracy and reliability.(01/01/2014)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Use either a late lane merge system or an early lane merge system, but not both, based on agency goals and objectives for improving work zone operations. (September 2007)

Coordinate extensively with other stakeholder agencies.(1/1/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Place portable changeable message signs (CMS) on the shoulder or median nearest the discontinuous lane when implementing a dynamic late merge system (DLMS) to manage a work zone.(10/1/2003)

Plan adequate time to calibrate Bluetooth readers to maximize accuracy and reliability.(01/01/2014)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Focus on the integration of business processes at the institutional or programmatic level rather than at the operations level.(2011)

Consider changeable message sign (CMS) positioning, data archive requirements, and traffic demand when considering deployment of a dynamic late merge system.(28 December 2004)

Employ a proactive approach for building public awareness of the project requiring a work zone and deliver accurate information to the public. (November 2002)

During system testing, CV Pilot sites discover the importance of having expertise in detecting and mitigating interferences with radio frequency and GPS signals(12/13/2018)

Refine institutional arrangements when deploying connected vehicle technology to outline the expectations of partners in terms of service, outcomes and reporting.(12/13/2018)

Refine proper antenna placement on connected vehicles (particularly commercial vehicles) to reduce DSRC ‘shadow’ areas where DSRC signal is degraded.(12/13/2018)

Connected vehicle deployers are encouraged to utilize multi-vendor outsourcing and to source suppliers early to create a collaborative environment that enables as much parallel work as possible.(12/13/2018)

Connected vehicle deployers should assess field equipment and organizational capabilities that will be needed to support core CV components.(12/13/2018)

Deploy automated speed enforcement with dynamic "your speed" signs in work zones to heighten visual attention from drivers.(01/01/2016)

Coordinate extensively with other stakeholder agencies.(1/1/2004)

Use ITS to implement a reliable communications system in work zones.(1/1/2004)

Ensure initial and ongoing success of ITS deployments by providing sufficient start-up time, maintaining flexibility, and performing maintenance needs in-house.(1/1/2004)

Verify that proposed innovations and technologies will operate as advertised.(01/01/2014)

Plan to recalibrate traffic sensors to accommodate lane shifts and other changes near work zones.(01/01/2014)

Plan adequate time to calibrate Bluetooth readers to maximize accuracy and reliability.(01/01/2014)

Ensure machine vision cameras are aligned to properly detect the onset of a queue.(01/01/2011)

Maintain ownership of the work zone ITS system and monitor vendor's work diligently to assure proper system operation.(October 2008)

Place portable changeable message signs (CMS) on the shoulder or median nearest the discontinuous lane when implementing a dynamic late merge system (DLMS) to manage a work zone.(10/1/2003)

Provide traveler information in rural areas to allow for good travel decisions in inclement weather and construction season.(November 2001)

Beware that work zone construction equipment operating at low speed can block and interfere with portable traffic detection systems used to control variable speed limit systems in active work zones.(January 7 - 11, 2018)

Variable advisory speed limit (VASL) systems encourage drivers to slow down gradually as they approach rural work zones.(08/01/2013)

Ensure proper placement of variable speed limit (VSL) signs in a work zone and operate the VSL system consistently on a long term basis.(03/01/2010)

In-vehicle work zone messages prove to be more effective than portable roadside dynamic message signs.(June 2017)

Use Bluetooth sensors to improve detection of traffic stoppages in work zones where other non-intrusive portable traffic speed sensors may only report average speeds.(2013)

Consider deploying ITS in a work zone to improve traffic safety and mobility during construction.(October 2008)

Coordinate the schedules for ITS deployment and roadway construction to maximize use and benefits of the system.(October 2008)

Use dynamic lane merge systems to improve operations in long term construction zones.(October 2004)

Consider using real time traffic control system to overcome mobility and safety obstacles in a work zone.(October 2004)

Build public awareness of large-scale construction projects and keep the public informed of work zone schedules to help minimize the associated travel impacts.(1/1/2004)

Address critical issues early in the ITS work zone management system development and deployment processes, and allow sufficient start-up time.(November 2002)

Sixty-three (63) percent of city officials surveyed agreed that autonomous vehicles can improve the quality of life in U.S. cities.(05/24/2019)

A survey of State and local transportation agencies found that AVL applications for highway maintenance can have benefit-to-cost ratios ranging from 2.6:1 to 24:1 or higher.(January 2004)

Device that mitigates wind induced vibration of mast arms results in a 27 percent overall cost reduction of traffic signal structures.(12/01/2018)

The use of drones for bridge inspections can create an overall average cost savings of 40 percent without a reduction in inspection quality.(08/04/2018)

Integrating Hydrogen fueling with DC fast charging stations can reduce Hydrogen costs by about 30 percent.(December 2016)

Michigan DOT estimated that significant time and cost savings can be reaped from utilizing drones to perform bridge inspections.

Labor costs required to collect and prepare highway inventory datasets can range from $72 to $1,075 per mile.(2014)

Mobile LiDAR infrastructure inventory survey techniques are preferred by state DOTs where data quality and completeness are top priority.(2014)

LiDAR scanning systems collect huge amounts of geospatial data in a very short time; plan for major data reduction efforts that require intensive computing, software development, and technical expertise.(2014)

A GIS based transportation asset management system implemented in St. John's County, Florida increased productivity of maintenance operations by 13.3 percent saving more than $650,000.(January 2012)

In rural areas, communication networks that provide immediate access to remote data controls on field data can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations and maintenance activities.(5/1/2005)

In Montana, mainline weigh-in-motion scales can improve pavement fatigue estimates and save $4.1 million per year in construction costs.(11 August 2003)

Portland's e-scooter pilot reduced VMT by 300,000 over 120 days.(02/07/2019)

Portable field mapping systems reduce delivery time for post-landslide maintenance and have potential annual net savings in labor costs of $208,000.(10 February 2005 )

In Minneapolis, implementation of a queue warning system resulted in 54 percent decrease in near-crashes and 22 percent decrease in crashes along segment of interstate.(June 13, 2017)

In work zone areas, dynamic message signs are most effective at night and when alerting drivers of the presence of workers.(June 3, 2017)

In work zone areas, dynamic message signs are most effective at night and when alerting drivers of the presence of workers.(June 3, 2017)

Truck-mounted radar speed signs were effective in reducing traffic speeds by 5 to 23 percent versus reductions of 4 to 8 percent in work zones without them.(01/01/2016)

A traveler information system for informing visitors to the Grand Canyon National Park of the availability of a shuttle for car-free travel to the Canyon View Information Plaza added 368 shuttle riders per day, an increase of transit mode share by 45.7 percent.(March 2009)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) greatly reduced traffic demand through a highway work zone in California resulting reducing maximum average peak delay 50 percent more than expected.(22-26 January 2006)

In North Carolina, work zone construction staff observed a dramatic reduction in queue frequency and length when using a smart work zone traveler information system.(May 2005)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) deployed near Los Angeles, California, reduced freeway delay by 46 percent.(9-13 January 2005)

Modeling data indicated that an automated work zone information system deployed on I-5 near Los Angeles contributed to a 4.3 percent increase in diversions and an 81 percent increase in average network speed.(9-13 January 2005)

In North Carolina, a survey of motorists who experienced a smart work zone information system on I-95 found that 85 percent of respondents changed routes at least once in response to the delay and alternate route information posted.(9-13 January 2005)

An automated work zone information system deployed near Los Angeles effectively diverted traffic to alternate routes during periods of congestion.(2005)

In Los Angeles, a survey of motorists who experienced an automated work zone information system found that 78 percent of respondents changed their route based on the information provided.(2005)

During lane closures in the Minneapolis/St. Paul region a dynamic late merge system reduced confusion and aggressive driving, decreased queue lengths, and reduced congestion.(28 December 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed at a work zone outside Detroit reduced aggressive driving maneuvers.(October 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed in a work zone outside Detroit increased PM peak travel speeds by 15 percent, no change in AM peak speeds.(October 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed outside Detroit was found to be cost-effective based on an analysis of system cost and motorist time and fuel savings.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT enhanced work zone safety on I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system that posted traffic information and enforcement updates (number of citations issued) on dynamic message signs located upstream of the work zone.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT staff reported a high level of satisfaction with the automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of Interstate 55.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT reduced operating costs during the reconstruction of I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system and eliminating the need for constant traffic monitoring.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT indicated that an automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of I-55 improved mobility by preventing severe congestion in the work zone. (October 2004)

In North Carolina, Smart Work Zone systems increased alternate route usage by 10 to 15 percent when specific delay and alternate route information was posted on roadside dynamic message signs.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, a modeling study indicated that work zone delay messages reduced maximum traffic backups by 56 percent and contributed to 55 percent reduction in traveler delay.(11-15 January 2004.)

An I-40 work zone in Arkansas equipped with an automated work zone information system had fewer fatal crashes compared to similar sites without the technology.(12-16 January 2003)

Ninety-seven (97) percent of the motoring public found that predicted travel time information was useful when posted at a work zone on I-75 near Dayton, Ohio. (January 2002)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a motorist survey found 61% of drivers who experienced a portable traffic management system at a work zone felt more informed about traffic conditions than at other work zones.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, traffic speed data collected at two interstate work zones showed that when portable traffic management systems were deployed, work zone traffic volumes increased 4 to 7 percent during peak periods.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a portable traffic management system (PTMS) installed at two interstate work zones improved safety by slowing approaching vehicles by 9 mi/hr and reducing speed variability by 70 percent. (May 1997)

Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) can provide route diversion information during periods of congestion when phone and internet travel advisory systems are not available; benefit-to-cost ratios can range from 4:1 to 16:1 assuming a 5 to 20 percent compliance rate.(2017)

A traveler information system for informing visitors to the Grand Canyon National Park of the availability of a shuttle for car-free travel to the Canyon View Information Plaza added 368 shuttle riders per day, an increase of transit mode share by 45.7 percent.(March 2009)

In North Carolina, a survey of local residents near the Smart Work Zone systems found that over 95 percent of motorists surveyed would support use of these systems in the future.(September 2004)

An I-40 work zone in Arkansas equipped with an automated work zone information system had fewer fatal crashes compared to similar sites without the technology.(12-16 January 2003)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

Rapid deployment of DSRC for connected vehicles can save thousands of lives, regardless of whether a later transition to C-V2X proves advantageous.(12/12/2017)

Audible "slow traffic ahead" alerts can improve drivers' situational awareness and increase safety on freeways.(June 2011)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) greatly reduced traffic demand through a highway work zone in California resulting reducing maximum average peak delay 50 percent more than expected.(22-26 January 2006)

An evaluation of the Arizona 511 telephone traveler information system found that more than 70 percent of users surveyed were satisfied with the enhanced content provided.(30 September 2005)

Dynamic outreach efforts in a construction workzone in Southern California reduce traffic volume by 20 percent and peak hour delay by 50 percent.(31 July 2005)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

The Illinois DOT enhanced work zone safety on I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system that posted traffic information and enforcement updates (number of citations issued) on dynamic message signs located upstream of the work zone.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT indicated that an automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of I-55 improved mobility by preventing severe congestion in the work zone. (October 2004)

In North Carolina, a survey of local residents near the Smart Work Zone systems found that over 95 percent of motorists surveyed would support use of these systems in the future.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, a modeling study indicated that work zone delay messages reduced maximum traffic backups by 56 percent and contributed to 55 percent reduction in traveler delay.(11-15 January 2004.)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, traffic speed data collected at two interstate work zones showed that when portable traffic management systems were deployed, work zone traffic volumes increased 4 to 7 percent during peak periods.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a portable traffic management system (PTMS) installed at two interstate work zones improved safety by slowing approaching vehicles by 9 mi/hr and reducing speed variability by 70 percent. (May 1997)

With Advanced Traveler Information Systems additional travel time through work zones decreased from 14 percent to 3 percent.(January 2009)

In Kalamazoo Michigan, the activation of the Dynamic Lane Merge System in a work zone reduced the number of forced merges seven fold and reduced the number of dangerous merges three fold.(October 2008)

A dynamic late lane merge system reduced vehicle emissions by 15.7 percent at a highway work zone in southern Michigan.(September 2007)

A dynamic late lane merge system decreased vehicle stops by 47 percent at a highway work zone in southern Michigan.(September 2007)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) greatly reduced traffic demand through a highway work zone in California resulting reducing maximum average peak delay 50 percent more than expected.(22-26 January 2006)

During lane closures in the Minneapolis/St. Paul region a dynamic late merge system reduced confusion and aggressive driving, decreased queue lengths, and reduced congestion.(28 December 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed at a work zone outside Detroit reduced aggressive driving maneuvers.(October 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed in a work zone outside Detroit increased PM peak travel speeds by 15 percent, no change in AM peak speeds.(October 2004)

A dynamic lane merge system deployed outside Detroit was found to be cost-effective based on an analysis of system cost and motorist time and fuel savings.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT enhanced work zone safety on I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system that posted traffic information and enforcement updates (number of citations issued) on dynamic message signs located upstream of the work zone.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT staff reported a high level of satisfaction with the automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of Interstate 55.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT reduced operating costs during the reconstruction of I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system and eliminating the need for constant traffic monitoring.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT indicated that an automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of I-55 improved mobility by preventing severe congestion in the work zone. (October 2004)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

A simulation model used to manage work zone mobility reduced delay; saved travelers more than $1.63 million per day during reconstruction at the I-75/I-96 interchange in Detroit.(2011)

Augmented speed enforcement system in work zone significantly reduced the number of vehicles traveling in excess of 65 mph(01/01/2013)

A photo-radar enforcement van reduced the number of speeding vehicles in a work zone by 24 percent.(April 2010)

Speed photo-radar enforcement decreased average car speeds in work zones up to 7.9 mi/hr in median lanes and 7.7 mi/hr in shoulder lanes at highway work zones, being equally as effective as the presence of police patrols with emergency lights off.(January 2010)

In Texas, police who used remote camera/radar systems to enforce work zone speed limits noted improved safety to officers, but expressed some concern over effectiveness in identifying speeding vehicles.(13-17 January 2002)

Speed display trailers can reduce average vehicle speeds by 5 mi/hr and decrease the number of vehicles traveling at excessive speeds in rural work zones. (2000)

In Nebraska, a portable speed detection and warning system placed upstream from an I-80 work zone decreased the highest 15 percent of vehicle speeds by about 5 mi/hr as vehicles approached the work zone lane merge area.(May 2000)

Speed-activated dynamic message signs with warning messages reduced vehicle speeds by 8 to 9 mi/hr; sustained effects for long-term work zones.(December 1998)

At a work zone in South Dakota, a speed monitoring and display system reduced the number of speeding passenger vehicles and trucks by as much as 25 and 40 percent respectively.(1995)

Speed activated dynamic message signs (DMS) with warning messages reduced speeding vehicles by 50 percent or more in Virginia work zones. (August 1994)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, work zone surveillance and response at the "Big I" Interchange reduced average clearance time by 44 percent.(4-7 June 2001)

During the first year of operations at the "Big I" work zone in Albuquerque, temporary traffic management and motorist assistance patrols reduced the average incident response time to less than eight minutes, and no fatalities were reported.(4-7 June 2001)

Smart Work Zone (SWZ) systems can detect congestion, display travel times, and recommend alternate routes. Benefit-to-cost ratios range from 10:1 to 12:1.(06/01/2019)

A work zone queue warning system at the I-70/I-57 interchange reduced queuing crashes by 14 percent and injury crashes by 11 percent.(01/01/2014)

A freeway work zone queue warning system was installed for approximately $1.545 million.(01/01/2014)

Expanding permanent DMS operations to include information on I-70 work zones has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 6.9:1.(December 2013)

In North Carolina, Portable Traffic-Monitoring Devices found to provide a cost-effective and safe means of recording speed and traffic counts in work zones.(June 11, 2010)

In Little Rock Arkansas, 82 percent of the drivers surveyed agreed that the Automated Work Zone Information System improved their ability to react to slow or stopped traffic.(October 2008)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) greatly reduced traffic demand through a highway work zone in California resulting reducing maximum average peak delay 50 percent more than expected.(22-26 January 2006)

In North Carolina, work zone construction staff observed a dramatic reduction in queue frequency and length when using a smart work zone traveler information system.(May 2005)

In North Carolina, a work zone equipped with smart work zone traveler information systems observed fewer crashes compared to other work zones without the technology.(May 2005)

An automated work zone information system (AWIS) deployed near Los Angeles, California, reduced freeway delay by 46 percent.(9-13 January 2005)

Modeling data indicated that an automated work zone information system deployed on I-5 near Los Angeles contributed to a 4.3 percent increase in diversions and an 81 percent increase in average network speed.(9-13 January 2005)

In North Carolina, a survey of motorists who experienced a smart work zone information system on I-95 found that 85 percent of respondents changed routes at least once in response to the delay and alternate route information posted.(9-13 January 2005)

An automated work zone information system deployed near Los Angeles effectively diverted traffic to alternate routes during periods of congestion.(2005)

In Los Angeles, a survey of motorists who experienced an automated work zone information system found that 78 percent of respondents changed their route based on the information provided.(2005)

The Illinois DOT enhanced work zone safety on I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system that posted traffic information and enforcement updates (number of citations issued) on dynamic message signs located upstream of the work zone.(October 2004)

License plate recognition system successful in monitoring travel times, leading to reduced congestion in work zone.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT staff reported a high level of satisfaction with the automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of Interstate 55.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT reduced operating costs during the reconstruction of I-55 by deploying an automated traffic control system and eliminating the need for constant traffic monitoring.(October 2004)

The Illinois DOT indicated that an automated traffic control system deployed during the reconstruction of I-55 improved mobility by preventing severe congestion in the work zone. (October 2004)

In North Carolina, a survey of local residents near the Smart Work Zone systems found that over 95 percent of motorists surveyed would support use of these systems in the future.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, Smart Work Zone systems increased alternate route usage by 10 to 15 percent when specific delay and alternate route information was posted on roadside dynamic message signs.(September 2004)

In North Carolina, a modeling study indicated that work zone delay messages reduced maximum traffic backups by 56 percent and contributed to 55 percent reduction in traveler delay.(11-15 January 2004.)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, travel times and alternative route information posted on dynamic message signs prompted 12 to 14 percent of drivers to divert onto less congested alternative routes.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

Ninety-seven (97) percent of the motoring public found that predicted travel time information was useful when posted at a work zone on I-75 near Dayton, Ohio. (January 2002)

A work zone management system with real-time traffic information on I-496 in Lansing, Michigan had a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2:1.(14 March 2001)

In Nebraska, a portable speed detection and warning system placed upstream from an I-80 work zone decreased the highest 15 percent of vehicle speeds by about 5 mi/hr as vehicles approached the work zone lane merge area.(May 2000)

In Greenwood, Nebraska a portable traffic management system designed to caution drivers of work zone activity and encourage use of alternative routes during periods of congestion increased traffic diversion by 4 percent.(May 2000)

In Greenwood, Nebraska a survey of travelers indicated that 29 percent of drivers who remembered DMS messages at a work zone on I-80 thought the alternate route information provided was not useful; 23 percent thought the caution messages were not useful.(May 2000)

Speed-activated dynamic message signs with warning messages reduced vehicle speeds by 8 to 9 mi/hr; sustained effects for long-term work zones.(December 1998)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a motorist survey found 61% of drivers who experienced a portable traffic management system at a work zone felt more informed about traffic conditions than at other work zones.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, traffic speed data collected at two interstate work zones showed that when portable traffic management systems were deployed, work zone traffic volumes increased 4 to 7 percent during peak periods.(May 1997)

In the Minneapolis/St. Paul, a portable traffic management system (PTMS) installed at two interstate work zones improved safety by slowing approaching vehicles by 9 mi/hr and reducing speed variability by 70 percent. (May 1997)

In Minnesota, a survey of travelers indicated that Smart Work Zone warning signs were accurate, useful, and gave travelers the information they needed.(January 1997)

In Philadelphia, the Traffic and Incident Management System (TIMS) on I-95 contributed to a 40 percent decrease in freeway incidents and reduced the incident-severity rate by 8 percent.(January 1997)

At a work zone in South Dakota, a speed monitoring and display system reduced the number of speeding passenger vehicles and trucks by as much as 25 and 40 percent respectively.(1995)

Speed activated dynamic message signs (DMS) with warning messages reduced speeding vehicles by 50 percent or more in Virginia work zones. (August 1994)

Portable variable speed limit system in Utah successfully reduces speed limit by 15 to 25 mi/hr near work zones.(January 7 - 11, 2018)

As a result of a Portable Variable Speed Limit System installed along a construction zone in Alaska, the percentage of vehicles speeding decreased by 57 percent.(10/06/2017)

In Smart Zone work zones, 71 percent of local resident survey respondents found variable speed limit signs useful.(January 28, 2015)

Variable advisory speed limit systems reduce variability in speeds and improve safety at congested work zones.(08/01/2013)

A variable speed limit system used to regulate traffic flow through work zones on a 7.5 mile section of I-495 saved motorists approximately 267 vehicle-hours of delay each day.(03/01/2010)

Field data collected over the last two decades show variable speed limit (VSL) systems can reduce crash potential by 8 to 30 percent. (03/01/2010)

A variable speed limit system deployed at a work zone on I-96 in Lansing, Michigan contributed to a decrease in the number of high-speed vehicles in the work zone.(September 2003)

A variable speed limit system deployed at a work zone on I-96 in Lansing, Michigan contributed to a decrease in travel times and an increase in average speeds.(September 2003)

On the Køge Bugt Motorway in Copenhagen, Denmark, variable speed limits reduced vehicle speeds by up to 5 km/h and contributed to smoother traffic flow during peak periods.(8 April 2003)

A survey of motorists in Copenhagen, Denmark, found that 80 percent of respondents were satisfied with variable speed limits and the traveler information posted on dynamic message signs.(8 April 2003)

Truck-mounted radar speed signs were effective in reducing traffic speeds by 5 to 23 percent versus reductions of 4 to 8 percent in work zones without them.(01/01/2016)

In Washington DC, an ITS work zone program implemented on I-295 decreased delay up to 90 percent with an average decrease in delay of 52 percent when drivers were advised to take alternate routes.(October 2008)

In Texas, during major incidents or high construction impact periods, the work zone traffic management system diverted an average of 10 percent of mainline traffic to alternate routes, with the highest diversion of traffic at 28 percent.(October 2008)

In Iowa, a CB radio alert system designed to warn truckers of slow moving maintenance vehicles on freeways effectively warned 39 of 59 truckers interviewed that remembered seeing the maintenance work in-progress.(May 2000)

System costs for maintenance vehicle AVL systems were projected for upstate California; capital costs for on-board equipment were estimated at $5,000 to $15,000 per vehicle.(06/14/2019)

Costs data available for several advanced winter maintenance technologies: automatic vehicle location (AVL) range from $1,250 to $5,800 per vehicle; fixed automated spray technology (FAST) range from $22,000 to $4 million; and a large-scale multi-agency, 400-vehicle winter weather management system costs $8.2 million.(September 2006)

The Southeast Michigan Snow and Ice Management AVL/GPS system cost approximately $1.862 million.(June 2002)

A Minnesota integrated communications system project to share application of ITS across transportation, public safety, and transit agencies cost just over $1.5 million.(November 2001)

In Detroit, the design and construction of traffic signal interconnection upgrades, DSRC field infrastructure, and communication systems designed to support CV applications cost $1.33 million on a 6-mile corridor and $1.42 million on a 12-mile corridor.(3/25/2019)

An agency owned mobile automated roadway mapping system can cost $10,000 to $40,000.(06/01/2015)

Statewide Implementation of a Maintenance Decision Suport System (MDSS) in Indiana for FY09 cost $529,000(2009)

TMC central hardware costs can exceed $200,000 if regional communications and system integration are required.(5 August 2004)

The initial capital costs for software development and systems integration at the Chicago TMC were estimated at $4 million.(May 2003)

Leased fiber optic services that include favorable maintenance agreements can be more cost effective than owned services that have high maintenance costs.(December 2002)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) spent a total of $287,282 on a 2018 shared dockless e-scooter pilot program, with $212,077 of the costs recovered by program and permit fees.(02/07/2019)

A traveler information system with two highway advisory radios and a portable dynamic message sign was deployed in a 3-month pilot test at the Grand Canyon National Park at a cost of $19,600.(March 2009)

Minnesota DOT deployed a dynamic late merge system for $900 per day per direction.(September 12, 2005)

Illinois DOT implements work zone ITS on the I-64 Add-lane Construction project at a cost of $435,000.(12 September 2005)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

ITS deployment set to improve safety, efficiency, air quality, and traveler information to cost $11,250,000 across Colorado.(12/29/2004)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

North Carolina DOT leased its first smart work zone system along I-95 near Fayetteville at a cost of $235,000.(3 June 2003)

In Arkansas, the contract bid costs for two different automated work zone information system ranged from $390 to $750 per day.(12-16 January 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Average cost to install a highway advisory radio station ranged from $40,000 to $50,000 as reported by agencies that continue to use this technology.(2017)

A traveler information system with two highway advisory radios and a portable dynamic message sign was deployed in a 3-month pilot test at the Grand Canyon National Park at a cost of $19,600.(March 2009)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

In Arkansas, the contract bid costs for two different automated work zone information system ranged from $390 to $750 per day.(12-16 January 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

The highway advisory radio (HAR) system deployed at Blewett/Stevens pass in Washington State included a portable HAR unit ($30,000), and two fixed HAR stations ($15,000 each).(July 2001)

The average cost to upgrade backhaul telecommunications to support a DSRC roadside unit for V2I applications is estimated to vary from $3,000, if the site has sufficient backhaul and will only need an upgrade, to $40,000, if the site requires a completely new backhaul system.(09/01/2015)

From the 511 Deployment Coalition case study: total costs (to design, implement, and operate for one year) averaged $2.5 million among six statewide systems and $1.8 million among three metropolitan systems.(November 2006)

Illinois DOT implements work zone ITS on the I-64 Add-lane Construction project at a cost of $435,000.(12 September 2005)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

Detailed costs of road weather information systems deployed at several sites north of Spokane, WA.(8 January 2004)

North Carolina DOT leased its first smart work zone system along I-95 near Fayetteville at a cost of $235,000.(3 June 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Cost estimates for rural ITS in Arizona (ITS maintenance, weather information systems, highway advisory radio, motorist assistance patrols, and training applications) totaled $3.78 million per year for five years.(September 2007)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

The cost to implement and operate a dynamic lane merge system for 11 weeks was estimated at $57,108.(September 2007)

Minnesota DOT deployed a dynamic late merge system for $900 per day per direction.(September 12, 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

Michigan DOT leased a dynamic lane merge system for I-94 reconstruction project at a cost of $120,000.(October 2004)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Illinois DOT implements work zone ITS on the I-64 Add-lane Construction project at a cost of $435,000.(12 September 2005)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

In Arkansas, the contract bid costs for two different automated work zone information system ranged from $390 to $750 per day.(12-16 January 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

In San Diego, the cost to furnish, install, operate, and maintain an Automated Work Zone Information System (AWIS) for 750 working days was estimated at $53,000.(09/26/2016)

Utah DOT installed 10 Bluetooth readers for $40,000 to monitor work zone traffic conditions during a nine month project. O&M was estimated at $33,000.(01/01/2014)

I-70 Corridor ITS Study identifies system costs for several technology applications.(June 2010)

Minnesota DOT deployed a dynamic late merge system for $900 per day per direction.(September 12, 2005)

Illinois DOT implements work zone ITS on the I-64 Add-lane Construction project at a cost of $435,000.(12 September 2005)

Based on a study of 17 states, the majority of work zone ITS cost between $150,000 and $500,000.(12 September 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Tucson were estimated at $72.1 million. (May 2005)

A modeling study evaluated the potential deployment of full ITS capabilities in Cincinnati. The annualized life-cycle cost was estimated at $98.2 million.(May 2005)

The annualized life-cycle costs for full ITS deployment and operations in Seattle were estimated at $132.1 million.(May 2005)

A real-time work zone traffic control system leased by the Illinois Department of Transportation cost $785,000.(October 2004)

Michigan DOT leased a dynamic lane merge system for I-94 reconstruction project at a cost of $120,000.(October 2004)

North Carolina DOT leased its first smart work zone system along I-95 near Fayetteville at a cost of $235,000.(3 June 2003)

In Arkansas, the contract bid costs for two different automated work zone information system ranged from $390 to $750 per day.(12-16 January 2003)

The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) leased an automated work zone information system in West Memphis for $495,000 which was less than 4% of the total recontruction project cost. West Memphis is one of four locations highlighted in a cross cutting study.(November 2002)

Ohio DOT installed eight Web cameras, at a cost of $17,000, as a temporary solution to traffic surveillance in work zones.(July 2001)

The use of ITS for a temporary construction zone management in Michigan yields a positive benefit-to-cost ratio.(14 March 2001)

Utah DOT rented equipment for a portable variable speed limit system for an average daily cost of between $173 and $329.(January 7 - 11, 2018)

The Virginia DOT implemented and operated a variable speed limit (VSL) system for two years on a 7.5 mile section of I-495 for $3.2 million (2008).(03/01/2010)

The Michigan DOT leased seven variable speed limit trailers for six months at a cost of approximately $400,900.(December 2002)

Pedestrian light emitting diode (LED) crosswalk control treatments in British Columbia range from $10,000 to $125,000.(12/01/2018)

On-board Maintenance Vehicle AVL - Capital cost/unit - $5000 - O&M cost/unit - $1000(06/14/2019)

On-board Maintenance Vehicle AVL - Capital cost/unit - $5000 - O&M cost/unit - $1000(06/14/2019)

Transportation Management/Operations Fleet Data Collection Equipment Installation Labor - Capital cost/unit - $1000(06/27/2014)

Transportation Management/Operations Fleet Video Data Collection System - Capital cost/unit - $1000(06/27/2014)

Transportation Management/Operations Fleet Data Collection Equipment - Capital cost/unit - $1000(06/27/2014)

Transportation Management/Operations Fleet Collection Equipment Cabling/Installation Kit - Capital cost/unit - $1000(06/27/2014)

ITS Training - O&M cost/unit - $2000(01/01/2012)

ITS Training - O&M cost/unit - $2000(01/01/2012)

In-vehicle Mobile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

In-vehicle Moblile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

In-vehicle Moblile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Wireless Communications, Low Usage - O&M cost/unit - $276(1 August 2004)

DSRC Roadside Unit - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(11/13/2017)

DSRC Roadside Unit - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(11/13/2017)

Roadside Equipment for DSRC - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(09/01/2015)

Fiber Optic Cable - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information Systems Integration - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information System Operational Support - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Static Signage - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

CCTV Camera - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Truck Parking Information System Software Maintenance/Licensing - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Fiber Optics Communications Network (Wide Area) - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Fiber Optic Network Equipment - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Vehicle Detector - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Utilities Connection - Capital cost/unit - $50000(06/02/2015)

Mobile GNSS roadway mapping system - Capital cost/unit - $10000(06/01/2015)

Mobile GNSS roadway mapping system - Capital cost/unit - $10000(06/01/2015)

Highway infrastructure inventory - O&M cost/unit - $107(2014)

Highway infrastructure inventory - O&M cost/unit - $107(2014)

Highway infrastructure inventory - O&M cost/unit - $107(2014)

Highway infrastructure inventory - O&M cost/unit - $107(2014)

Highway infrastructure inventory - O&M cost/unit - $107(2014)

In-vehicle Mobile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

In-vehicle Moblile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

In-vehicle Moblile Data Collection (MDC) hardware - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS) Traning - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

MDSS Software and Operations - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Moblie Data Collection (MDC) Communications - Capital cost/unit - $2000 - O&M cost/unit - $200 - Lifetime - 5 years(May 12, 2009)

Automatic Passenger Counter (APC) system - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(June 2003)

Automatic Passenger Counter (APC) system - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(June 2003)

Automated Passenger Counter (APC) system - Capital cost/unit - $7450 - Lifetime - 5 years(June 2003)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Changeable Message Sign (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

DMS - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $824(5/1/2017)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $870(10/25/2016)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $787.5(10/25/2016)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(10/25/2016)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $824(10/25/2016)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(05/12/2015)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/06/2014)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/06/2014)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Rental - Capital cost/unit - $958.05(05/06/2014)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/06/2014)

Dynamic Message Sign (DMS) Rental - Capital cost/unit - $958.05(05/06/2014)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $100(05/30/2013)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $100(05/30/2013)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $60.51(05/30/2013)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Communications Network - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Ethernet Switch - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Portable Dynamic Message - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Modem - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Ethernet Switch - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Modem - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $12581.25(2013)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $4400(2013)

Ethernet Switch - Capital cost/unit - $1280.16(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $20000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $20000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $20000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign Controller - Capital cost/unit - $10800(01/01/2012)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(03/10/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable DMS (Rental) - Capital cost/unit - $16(02/25/2010)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Portable Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $44.84(2008)

Variable Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18300 - O&M cost/unit - $600 - Lifetime - 7 years(06/30/2006)

Portable Changeable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000

Portable Changeable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000

Portable Changeable Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $10000

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

Highway advisory radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2/4/2013)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $82270(2013)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $82270(2013)

Highway Advisory Radio - Capital cost/unit - $12670(2007)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Automated Work Zone Information System - Capital cost/unit - $53000(09/26/2016)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $12600(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $8643.5(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $3609.96(10/29/2013)

Trailer Mounted Portable CCTV - Capital cost/unit - $4900(10/29/2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Dynamic Message Sign - Portable - Capital cost/unit - $18816.25(2013)

Smart Work Zone - Wireless Connection for license plate reader system - O&M cost/unit - $200(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Remobilization - Capital cost/unit - $10000(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Mobilization - Capital cost/unit - $75000(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - T1 Communication for license plate reader system - O&M cost/unit - $700(3 June 2003)

Smart Work Zone - Monthly Equipment Rental - Capital cost/unit - $15000(3 June 2003)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)

Dynamic Message Sign - Capital cost/unit - $5000(01/01/2012)