Integration Link (18 unique benefit summaries found)

Link 2: Arterial Management to Freeway Management


In St. Louis County, Missouri, full closure of portions of I-64 for two years allowed for an accelerated construction schedule, saving taxpayers between $93 million and $187 million.(November 2011)

Implementing Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies on the U.S. 75 corridor in Dallas, Texas produced an estimated benefit-to-cost ratio of 20.4:1.(September 2010)

An Arterial Service Patrol deployed during the re-construction of I-64 in St. Louis had a benefit-cost ratio of 8.3:1, lowered secondary crashes by 183 per year, and reduced annual congestion costs by $1,034,000.(December, 2009)

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.(30 May 2000)

Simulation results indicated that vehicle emissions could be reduced by two percent if arterial traffic flow data were included in the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington.(30 May 2000)

A model determined that incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington could decrease the number of stops by 5.6 percent.(30 May 2000)

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.(30 May 2000)

Deploying advanced technologies and an integrated corridor management approach decreased congestion and improved traffic flow within an 8-mile corridor south of Twin Cities, Minneapolis encouraging 58% of motorists surveyed to use arterial streets for short trips rather than Interstate-494.(April 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland increased vehicle throughput 20 percent on arterials and 6 percent on freeways.(January 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland improved network travel times by 10 percent.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 40 percent changed route due to DMS recommendations.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 59 percent of respondents thought that ramp metering was very helpful or fairly helpful.(January 2000)

Evaluations of the QUARTET PLUS and TABASCO Projects in Europe found that transit signal priority reduced travel time for transit vehicles by 5 to 15 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS evaluation reports show that electronic toll collection can decrease traffic volumes by up to 17 percent.(1994-1998)

In Glasglow, Scotland, ITS evaluation reports show that ramp metering can improve freeway capacity by 5 to 13 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, a centralized and coordinated paratransit system resulted in a 2 to 3 percent annual decrease in the cost to provide paratransit services.(1994-1998)

In Paris, France, incident management resulted in a nine-minute reduction in response time(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS studies found customer satisfaction with traveler information delivered via portable electronic devices, public access terminals, Internet web sites, and in-vehicle navigation devices ranged from 50 to 95 percent. (1994-1998)